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MALAYSIA AND BORNEO – SABAH – PART FIVE

January 29, 2016

 

MALAYSIA ND BORNEO – BORNEO – PART FIVE

FROM JULY 9 -27, 2015 LEONARD EPSTEIN  AND JANELLE BURGESS TRAVELED THROUGH MALAYSIA AND BORNEO

SABAH, BORNEO

Borneo  is the third-largest island in the world and the largest island in Asia. At the geographic center of Maritime Southeast Asia, in relation to major Indonesian islands, it is located north of Java, west of Sulawesi, and east of Sumatra.

The island is divided among three countries: Malaysia and Brunei in the north, and Indonesia to the south. Approximately 73% of the island is Indonesian territory. In the north, the East Malaysian states of Sabah and Sarawak make up about 26% of the island. Additionally, the Malaysian federal territory of Labuan is situated on a small island just off the coast of Borneo. The sovereign state of Brunei, located on the north coast, comprises about 1% of Borneo’s land area. Antipodal to an area of Amazon rainforest, Borneo is itself home to one of the oldest rainforests in the world.

East Malaysia also known as Sabah, Sarawak and Labuan (Sabah, Sarawak dan Labuan) or Malaysian Borneo, is the part of Malaysia located on the island of Borneo. It consists of the Malaysian states of Sabah, Sarawak, and Federal Territory of Labuan. It lies to the east of Peninsular Malaysia (West Malaysia), which is located on the Malay Peninsula. The two are separated by the South China Sea. While East Malaysia is less populated and less developed than West Malaysia, its land mass is larger and it has notably more natural resources, chiefly oil and gas reserves.

Sabah  is Malaysia’s easternmost state, one of two Malaysian states on the island of Borneo. It is also one of the founding members of the Malaysian federation alongside Sarawak, Singapore (expelled in 1965) and the Federation of Malaya. Like Sarawak, this territory has an autonomous law especially in immigration which differentiates it from the rest of the Malaysian Peninsula states. It is located on the northern portion of the island of Borneo and known as the second largest state in the country after Sarawak, which it borders on its southwest. It shares a maritime border with the Federal Territory of Labuan on the west and with the Philippines to the north and northeast. The state’s only international border is with the province of North Kalimantan of Indonesia in the south. The capital of Sabah is Kota Kinabalu, formerly known as Jesselton. Sabah is often referred to as the “Land Below The Wind”, a phrase used by seafarers in the past to describe lands south of the typhoon belt.

 

KOTA KINABALU

Kota Kinabalu

Formerly known as Jesselton, is the capital of the state of Sabah, Malaysia. It is also the capital of the West Coast Division of Sabah. The city is located on the northwest coast of Borneo facing the South China Sea. The Tunku Abdul Rahman National Park lies to its west and Mount Kinabalu, which gave the city its name, is located to its east. Kota Kinabalu has a population of 452,058 and, including the adjacent Penampang and Putatan districts, the metro area has an estimated population of 628,725.

Kota Kinabalu is often known as KK both in Malaysia and internationally. It is a major fishing destination and a popular gateway for travellers visiting Sabah and Borneo. Kinabalu Park is located about 90 kilometres from the city and there are many other tourist attractions in and around the city. Kota Kinabalu is also one of the major industrial and commercial centers of East Malaysia. These two factors combine to make Kota Kinabalu one of the fastest growing cities in Malaysia.

Since the 15th century, the area of Jesselton was under the influence of the Bruneian Empire.In the late 1800s, the British North Borneo Company (BNBC) began to establish colonies throughout North Borneo. In 1882, BNBC founded a small settlement in the area known as Gaya Bay, which was already inhabited by Bajau people. The first settlement was on Gaya Island. In 1897, this first settlement was burned and destroyed by the indigenous Bajau-Suluk freedom fighter Mat Salleh.

After the destruction, BNBC decided to relocate the settlement to the more easily defended mainland at Gantian Bay (now Sepanggar Bay) in 1898. However that location was found to be unsuitable and in July 1899, Mr. Henry Walker, a Land Commissioner, identified a 30 acres (12 ha) site opposite Gaya Island as a replacement for Gantian. This fishing village named Api-Api (see Original names below) was chosen due to its proximity to the North Borneo Railway and its natural port that provided good anchorage, which was up to 24 feet deep.[By the end of 1899, construction had started on shoplots, a pier and government buildings. This new administrative centre was renamed Jesselton after Sir Charles Jessel, who was the then Vice-Chairman of BNBC.

The North Borneo War Monument was erected in Jesselton on 1923 to remembered those fallen British soldiers during the World War I.

Jesselton suffered  large destruction when it was razed by the British as they retreated from the Japanese, and suffered more destruction when the Allies bombed it in 1945. After the Japanese takeover of Borneo, it was again renamed Api. Several rebellions against the Japanese military administration took place in Api. One major rebellion occurred on 10 October 1943 by a group called Kinabalu Guerrillas, consisting of local inhabitants. Japanese forces quelled the rebellion after its leader, Albert Kwok, was arrested and executed in 1944. In the later stages of the war, what remained of the town was destroyed again by  Allied  bombings day and night for over six months as part of the Borneo Campaign in 1945, leaving only three buildings standing. The war in North Borneo ended with the official surrender of the Japanese 37th Army by Lieutenant General Baba Masao in Labuan on 10 September 1945.

After the war, and on the edge of bankruptcy, the British North Borneo Company returned to administer Jesselton but was unable to finance the huge costs of reconstruction. They gave control of North Borneo to the British Crown on 18 July 1946. The new colonial government elected to rebuild Jesselton as the capital of North Borneo instead of Sandakan, which had also been destroyed by the war. The Crown Colony administration designed a plan, later known as the “Colonial Office Reconstruction and Development Plan for North Borneo: 1948–1955”, to rebuild North Borneo. This plan provided £6,051,939 for the rebuilding of infrastructure in North Borneo.

When the Crown Colony of North Borneo together with Sarawak, Singapore and the Federation of Malaya formed the Federation of Malaysia in 1963, it became known as Sabah, and Jesselton remained its capital.  On 22 December 1967, the State Legislative Assembly under Chief Minister Tun Mustapha bin Datu Harun passed a bill renaming Jesselton as Kota Kinabalu. The city was upgraded to city status on 2 February 2000.

 

PHOTOS  OF KOTA KINABALU

 

 

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KOTA KINABALU – CITY HALL

 

 

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KOTA KINABALU – RETAIL STORES

 

 

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KOTA KINABALU – RETAIL STORES

 

 

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KOTA KINABALU – RETAIL STORES

 

 

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KOTA KINABALU – RETAIL STORES

 

 

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KOTA KINABALU – RETAIL STORES

 

 

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KOTA KINABALU – STREET VENDOR

 

 

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KOTA KINABALU – LARGE BILLBOARD

 

 

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KOTA KIBABALU – PHOTO STUDIO ADVERTISEMENT

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KOTA KINABALU  WATER VILLAGE

 

Water Village in Kota Kinabalu

 A settlement of the Bajaus,  the descendants of pirates who set foot on this land in the early 19th Century. At present, the Bajaus have become fishermen and reside at this water village, which is built on stilts above the surface of the water – houses standing on stilts, connected by narrow wooden planks.
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AN  ARTICLE FROM THE STRAITS TIMES

Sabah’s water villages: Living on the fringe

PUBLISHED FEB 23, 2015, 12:06 AM SGT

Carolyn Hong

 

Visitors to Kota Kinabalu are usually warned not to venture to the water villages off Pulau Gaya.

The four or five villages are home to several thousand people, some of whom do not hold proper documentation to stay legally in Malaysia.

Many of them are Malaysians or have documentation but some are citizens elsewhere. In the worst case, they are stateless.

Their homes are, thus, regarded as a bit dodgy, and a bit of a water slum. But I had always wondered about their homes which I can see from Kota Kinabalu’s swish waterfront bars, and it turned out that a friend knows a resident there.

Being with a local helps assuage the villagers’ suspicion of outsiders.

The villages are not idyllic, mostly because of the vast amount of garbage that washes in every day. It’s amazing what people throw away into the sea. I saw large suitcases and office chairs washed up on the beach, along with tonnes of plastic and disposable items such as hotel bedroom slippers.

It’s no point cleaning them up, the people say, because more will simply wash in with the next tide.

The houses range from sizeable well-built abodes to small shacks, all crammed close together. In Kampung Pondo, in particular, some houses are so makeshift that people called them “box houses”. This apparently refers to a time when these were made of cardboard boxes although I’m not sure if there’s any truth to this.

Getting around the village can be confusing as the walkways branch off here and there, ending up as a maze for outsiders. Some of the walkways are mere single slippery planks that are tied together.

People tend to hang around outside to avoid the over-heated interior of their zinc-roofed homes. Some of them, especially in Kampong Pondo, are wary of outsiders.

But in the bigger villages with a mostly Malaysian population, the people were friendly enough to tell stories about their daily lives, stories about how they came to live here, and their hopes for the future. Some have fairly comfortable lives while others struggle with poverty so deep that they can’t afford to buy daily goods like soy sauce in packs that cost more than 50 sen.

These water villages stand in stark contrast to the rest of Kota Kinabalu. In fact, they stand in stark contrast to the other side of Gaya island itself where luxury resorts peddle rooms that cost a night more than what the villagers earned in a month.

Sometimes, the locals cynically joke that the water villages are the staff quarters of the resorts. There is a nugget of truth in this as some of the people provide services such as cargo transport for the resorts.

And this neatly tells their story. These people provide services and labour for the city’s industries, yet they live on its fringes. They are often blamed for crime and other social problems that afflict any big city.

Sabahans hold mixed feelings about them. They acknowledge that their vital role in the economy, yet do not want them in their neighbourhood.

The spate of security incursions in Sabah has made their lives a bit more difficult. The people feel insecure about their future, naturally. They have heard that they will be relocated but they do not know where. It could be far from the sea.

It might take a long time, though. This is not the first time the government had planned relocation, and besides, there’s still the headache of dealing with those without legitimate papers.

But as Sabah continues to be plagued by security issues, it’s harder to let sleeping dogs lie, so to speak.

 

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KOTA KINABALU WATER VILLAGE

 

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KOTA KINABALU WATER VILLAGE

 

 

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KOTA KINABALU WATER VILLAGE

 

 

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KOTA KINABALU WATER VILLAGE

 

 

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KOTA KINABALU WATER VILLAGE

 

 

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KOTA KINABALU WATER VILLAGE

 

 

 

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KOTA KINABALU WATER VILLAGE

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KOTA KINABALU WATER VILLAGE

 

 

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KOTA KINABALU WATER VILLAGE

—-

 

 

KINABALU PARK

Kinabalu Park established as one of the first national parks of Malaysia in 1964, is Malaysia’s first World Heritage Site designated by UNESCO in December 2000 for its “outstanding universal values” and the role as one of the most important biological sites in the world with more than 4,500 species of flora and fauna, including 326 bird and around 100 mammal species, and over 110 land snail species.

The region was designated as a national park in 1964. British colonial administrator and naturalist Hugh Low led an expedition from Tuaran to the region in 1895. He also became the first recorded man to reach the peak of Mount Kinabalu. The highest peak of the mountain was later named after him—Low’s Peak.

The park is dominated by Mount Kinabalu, one of the highest peaks in Southeast Asia at 4,095 metres. The slopes of Mount Kinabalu are home to an incredible variety of plants and animal species. Different elevations of the park and their micro climates support distinct habitats. The lower slopes are covered in lowland dipterocarp forest; above 1,200 m there is lower montane forest and at elevations above 2,600 m the cloud forest is characterized by a diversity of flowering plants. Above 3,300 m there is a sub-alpine meadow zone with stunted trees and shrubs. Above 3,700 m the strong winds and rain make it hard for plants to survive. Owing to its unique and varied ecology the park was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2000. The park has a number of trails and offers a range of activities and experiences, including the summit climb. The main entry point for the park is located 90 km from Kota Kinabalu at an elevation of 1,520 m above sea level.

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MT. KINABALU SEEN FROM A NEARBY REST STOP

 

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MT. KINABALU SEEN FROM A NEARBY TEA PLANTATION

 

 

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THE GUIDE DESCRIBES THE  CLIMBING PATH OF MT. KINABALU

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REST STOP WITH A VIEW OF MT. KINABALU

 

PORING

Poring is a small tourist resort in Sabah, Malaysia. Located 40 km south-east of the Kinabalu National Park Headquarters, in the district of Ranau, Poring is situated in lowland rainforest, contrasting with the montane and submontane rainforest of Kinabalu National Park. The name Poring comes from a Kadazandusun word for a bamboo species found in the area.

Poring is known for its hot springs and the popular recreation and tourist complex is known as Poring Hot Springs. The springs are known for their therapeutic properties and the waters with their sulphuric minerals are reputed to ease aching muscles. The baths are favoured by returned climbers of Mount Kinabalu.

 

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PORING HOT SPRINGS ENTRANCE

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PORING HOT SPRINGS

 

 

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PORING SPRINGS TREETOP CANOPY WALK WITH VIEWS OF MT. KINABALU

 

 

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PORING SPRINGS SHOPS SELLING SWIM TUBES

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SABAH TEA HOUSE

We stayed at the Sabah Tea house, which has a traditional Rungus Long house.

The Rungus are an ethnic group of Borneo, residing primarily in northern Sabah in the area surrounding Kudat. A sub-group of the Kadazan-Dusun, they have a distinctive language, dress, architecture, customs, and oral literature.

As with most indigenous ethnic groups in Borneo, culture revolves around rice; however, coconut and banana groves provide cash income. Women weave cloth on backstrap looms, and make containers from vine or beadwork. Many Rungus now work in town, and have abandoned the communal life of the longhouse for modern Malaysian society. Traditionally animist, with female shamans, most Rungus are now Christian.

Considered one of the most traditional ethnic groups in Sabah, many Rungus live in longhouses, with each family having its own separate quarters off a common hall. At the edge of the communal hall, a well-ventilated platform of split bamboo with outward sloping walls provides a place for socialising and communal work. The Rungus longhouse is quite different from the Murut longhouse. The houses are not perched on high stilts, but are usually only three to five feet above ground. The roof is low, and the walls are outward sloped. In olden times, longhouses of over 75 doors are said to have been common. Now, they rarely exceed 10 doors. Usually single story, more modern two-story versions of the longhouse also exist. Single-family houses are sometimes built near the longhouse – these take the same form, but are curiously short, looking like a slice from a cake.

 

 

 

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SABAH TEA HOUSE LONGHOUSE

 

 

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SABAH TEA HOUSE LONGHOUSE (DETAIL)

 

SABAH TEA HOUSE COTTAGES ARE NAMED AFTER WORD WAR II HEROES

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LOFTY HODGES COTTAGES

 

 

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LOFTY HODGES COTTAGES

 

SABAH TEA PLANTATION

It is  interesting  to see how tea is cultivated and prepared for sale to the public.

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SABAH TEA PLANTATION

 

 

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SABAH TEA FACTORY

 

 

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SABAH TEA FACTORY

 

 

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SABAH TEA FACTORY

 

 

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SABAH TEA FACTORY

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QUAILEY’S HILL MEMORIAL

Quailey’s Hill Memorial is a memorial located in the district of Ranau in the Malaysian state of Sabah. It commemorates an Australian POW, Allan Quailey who was killed on 16 February 1945 during the first Sandakan Death Marches by the Japanese soldiers

.Allan Quailey was born on 8 November 1920 in Lismore, New South Wales, Australia. On 5 August 1941, he joined as a volunteer in the Australian Imperial Force and was assigned to the 2/30th Australian Infantry Battalion. With the 8th Division he then sailed to Malaya but later was captured by the Japanese along with another 15,000 Australians during the fall of Singapore on 15 February 1942, and brought to Changi Prison. In July 1942, he was among the 1,500 Australians who were transferred aboard the SS Yubi Maru to Sandakan. On 31 January 1945, he was sent with other prisoners of war as “Group 3” on the first of the three death marches.

On 16 February his friends in the group noticed that Quailey would be unlikely to survive as when they arrived on a hill, he refused to go on and the Japanese guards would kill anyone who could not keep up . Shortly after, he was killed by the Japanese. His remains were kept and, after the war,  together with other corpses, buried in the military cemetary in Labuan as an “unknown soldier”. Only in 1999 was his identity discovered and the plate with the inscription “Known unto God”  replaced by a personal grave stone.

In 2005, an Australian historian Lynette Silver tracked down the original route of the Sandakan Death Marches, together with a Malaysian local trekking expert Tham Yau Kong. They discovered that some of the old-route led through an area today where the Sabah Tea Plantation is managed. Based on World War II documents, they could identify the place where the soldier Allan Quailey had been killed in February 1945 and proposed to rename the place as “Quailey’s Hill”. The management of the plantation approved the proposal and also agreed to set up a monument with a granite slab, which explained the circumstances of Quailey’s death.

On 14 July 2007, the monument was inaugurated during a ceremony by Masidi Manjun (Minister of Tourism, Culture and Environment of Sabah), Senator Anne McEwen (Senator for South Australia), Lynette Silver and Goh Mung Chwee (Managing Director of Sabah Tea).

The Quailey’s Hill Memorial is one of the stations on the “POW Route”. The route begins in Sandakan and ends at a camp in Ranau. Every station on the route is marked with a sign such as in the  image below.

 

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QUAILEY’S MEMORIAL HILL

 

 

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QUAILLEY’S MEMORIAL HILL

 

 

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QUAILLEY’S MEMORIAL HILL

 

 

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QUAILLEY’S MEMORIAL HILL

 

 

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QUAILLEY’S MEMORIAL HILL

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QUAILLEY’S MEMORIAL HILL

———————–

 

AGRO BAZAAR

Agro Bazaar market and restaurant is on the way to the Kinabatangan River

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AGRO BAZAAR

 

 

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AGRO BAZAAR

 

 

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AGRO BAZAAR

 

 

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AGRO BAZAAR

 

 

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AGRO BAZAAR

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AGRO BAZAAR

 

 

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AGRO BAZAAR RESTAURANT

 

 

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AGRO BAZAAR RESTAURANT

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KINABATANGAN RIVER

The Kinabatangan River is a river in Sabah, Malaysia, on the island of Borneo. It is the second longest river in Malaysia, with a length of 560 kilometres from its headwaters in the mountains of southwest Sabah, to its outlet at the Sulu Sea, east of Sandakan.

Kinabatangan is known for its remarkable wildlife and fascinating habitats such as limestone caves at Gomantong hill, dryland dipterocarp forests, riverine forest, freshwater swamp forest, oxbow lakesand salty mangrove swamps near the coast.

The ecology of the upper reaches of the river has been severely disrupted by excessive logging and clearing of land for plantations. However, the original lowland forests and mangrove swamps near the coast have largely survived, provide sanctuary for a population of saltwater crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus), and contain some of Borneo’s highest concentrations of wildlife. Of special note are Borneo’s indigenous proboscis monkeys, Bornean orangutan and Asian elephants. The area is also known for its great variety of birdlife.

Each year, the lashing rains of the northeast monsoon cause the river to swell rapidly. Unable to disgorge into the sea quickly enough, the river frequently overflows its banks and spreads across the flat land of its lower reaches, creating a huge floodplain. The lower Kinabatangan teems with animal and plant life, making it the best area for viewing wildlife, not just in Sabah but all of Southeast Asia.

In 1997, 270 square kilometres of the lower Kinabatangan floodplain was declared a protected area, and in 2001 this designation was upgraded to that of “bird sanctuary”, largely through the efforts of NGOs. Further efforts to have the area declared a “wildlife refuge” or even “national park” had been opposed by oil palm plantation owners seeking to expand their cultivated land.

By August 2006, following media attention after a decapitated elephant’s head was found floating down the river, the area was gazetted under the State’s Wildlife Conservation Enactment of 1997 as the Kinabatangan Wildlife Sanctuary. It is now under the purview of the Sabah Wildlife Department.

Currently, most nature tourism is concentrated around Sukau, accessible by road and offering comfortable accommodation to visitors prepared to pay for well-managed tours. The most populated area and also the Central Administration for Kinabatangan is Kinabatangan Town, along the Sandakan-Lahad Datu highway and about 90 kilometres from Sandakan Town. The largest cave system in Sabah, Gomantong Caves, can be found in this region.

These photos were taken on the Kinabatangan River

 

 

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KINABATANGAN RIVER – ELEPHANTS

 

 

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KINABATANGAN RIVER – ELEPHANTS

 

 

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KINABATANGAN RIVER – ELEPHANTS

 

 

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KINABATANGAN RIVER – ELEPHANTS

 

 

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KINABATANGAN RIVER – ELEPHANTS

 

 

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KINABATANGAN RIVER – ELEPHANTS

 

 

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KINABATANGAN RIVER – ELEPHANTS

 

 

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KINABATANGAN RIVER – ELEPHANTS

 

 

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KINABATANGAN RIVER – PROBOSCIS MONKEYS

 

 

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KINABATANGAN RIVER – PROBOSCIS MONKEYS

 

 

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KINABATANGAN RIVER – PROBOSCIS MONKEYS

 

 

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KINABATANGAN RIVER – PROBOSCIS MONKEYS

 

 

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KINABATANGAN RIVER – MONITOR LIZARD

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SANDAKAN

Sandakan, the former capital of Sabah, is a busy port town located at the entrance of a picturesque bay on the East Coast of Sabah. The town serves as the jumping off point for a range of nature-based attractions and wildlife adventures including Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre, Selingan Turtle Islands, the Kinabatangan River and Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey Sanctuary.

 

 

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SANDAKAN

 

 

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SANDAKAN – BILLBOARD

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SANDAKAN DEATH MARCH

Australian prisoners were sent to Sandakan in 1942 to build an airstrip. At first they were treated reasonably well. Gradually, however, rations were reduced and bashings increased.

By late 1944, with Allied forces advancing toward Borneo, the Japanese decided to send about 2,000 Australian and British prisoners westward to Ranau, in Borneo’s rugged interior. Weak and sick prisoners staggered for about 260 kilometres along jungle tracks. Many died on the way, their bodies never recovered. Those unable to continue were killed; those too weak to march had been left behind in Sandakan, where all died or were killed. Only six – all Australians – out of about a thousand sent to Ranau survived the war.

The Sandakan “death march” remains the greatest single atrocity committed against Australians in war.

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KUNDASANG WAR MEMORIAL

The Kundasang War Memorial  is a memorial located in Kundasang in the Malaysian state of Sabah, which is dedicated to the British and Australian soldiers who died in the Sandakan POW camp during their death marches to Ranau. Besides that, it also recognises the suffering and sacrifice of the native population of Sabah.

 

 

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KUNDASANG WAR MEMORIAL

 

 

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KUNDASANG WAR MEMORIAL

 

 

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KUNDASANG WAR MEMORIAL

 

 

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KUNDASANG WAR MEMORIAL

 

 

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KUNDASANG WAR MEMORIAL

 

 

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KUNDASANG WAR MEMORIAL

 

 

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KUNDASANG WAR MEMORIAL

 

 

 

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KUNDASANG WAR MEMORIAL

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KUNDASANG WAR MEMORIAL

 

 

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KUNDASANG WAR MEMORIAL

 

 

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KUNDASANG WAR MEMORIAL – A LIST OF BRITISH SOLDIERS WHO LOST THEIR LIVES AT SANDAKAN

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KUNDASANG WAR MEMORIAL

 

 

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A VIEW LOOKING FROM THE KUNDASANG WAR MEMORIAL———

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SANDAKAN MEMORIAL PARK

The Sandakan Memorial Park is a memorial site built in the grounds of the former Sandakan camp in the Malaysian state of Sabah. The site is dedicated to the memory of all prisoners in the camp who died during the Sandakan Death Marches. It also recognises the suffering and sacrifice of the native population.

The memorial park is located about 1.5 kilometres southwest of present-day Sandakan Airport, which occupies part of the former camp of the Australian B Force.

 

 

 

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SANDAKAN MEMORIAL PARK

 

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SANDAKAN MEMORIAL PARK

 

 

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SANDAKAN MEMORIAL PARK

 

 

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SANDAKAN MEMORIAL PARK

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SANDAKAN MEMORIAL PARK

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SANDAKAN MEMORIAL PARK

 

 

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SANDAKAN MEMORIAL PARK

 

 

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SANDAKAN MEMORIAL PARK

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SANDAKAN MEMORIAL PARK

 

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SEPILOK ORANG UTAN REHABILITATION CENTER

Set up in 1964, Sepilok is the best known of the four orang utan rehabilitation centres in the world. The centre covers 43 square kilometers within the 4,500 hectare Kabili-Sepilok Forest Reserve and is located approximately 25 km form Sandakan. Sepilok is a sanctuary for injured, orphaned or rescued orang utans who are trained how to survive in the forest; a learning process that can take years. Upon graduation rehabilitated orang utan are released into the surrounding forest. Many of the orang utan living in the forest return to the centre at the twice daily feeding times, giving visitors a unique chance to get close to orang utan. Since it was open Sepilok has successfully released over one hundred orang utan into their natural forest habitat.

 

 

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SEPILOK REHABILITATION ORANG UTAN CENTER

 

 

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SEPILOK REHABILITATION ORANG UTAN CENTER

 

 

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SEPILOK REHABILITATION ORANG UTAN CENTER

 

 

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SEPILOK REHABILITATION ORANG UTAN CENTER

 

 

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SEPILOK REHABILITATION ORANG UTAN CENTER

 

 

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SEPILOK REHABILITATION ORANG UTAN CENTER

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SEPILOK REHABILITATION ORANG UTAN CENTER

 

 

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SEPILOK REHABILITATION ORANG UTAN CENTER

 

 

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SEPILOK REHABILITATION ORANG UTAN CENTER

 

 

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SEPILOK REHABILITATION ORANG UTAN CENTER – HANDLERS

 

 

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SEPILOK REHABILITATION ORANG UTAN CENTER

 

 

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SEPILOK REHABILITATION ORANG UTAN CENTER – BABOON

 

 

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SEPILOK REHABILITATION ORANG UTAN CENTER – BABOON

 

 

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SEPILOK REHABILITATION ORANG UTAN CENTER – BABOON

 

 

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SEPILOK REHABILITATION ORANG UTAN CENTER – BABOON

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Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey Sanctuary

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Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey Sanctuary

A local palm-plantation owner has created a private proboscis monkey sanctuary, attracting the floppy-conked locals with sugar-free pancakes at 9.30am and 2.30pm feedings at Platform A, and 11.30am and 4.30pm at Platform B, a kilometre away. An estimated 300 wild monkeys live in the 6-sq-km reserve. The proboscis monkeys are enticed onto the main viewing platform so tourists can get better pictures, which may put you off if you’re looking for a more ecologically minded experience. Also keep an eye out for the delicately featured silver leaf monkeys.

Proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) are found only on Borneo, although if you take a close look at them, you’d swear you’ve spotted one in the corner of a dodgy bar. Named for their long bulbous noses, proboscis monkeys are potbellied and red-faced, and males are constantly, unmistakably…aroused. With the arrival of Europeans, Malays nicknamed the proboscis monyet belanda (Dutch monkey).

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Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey Sanctuary

 

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Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey Sanctuary

 

 

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Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey Sanctuary

 

 

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Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey Sanctuary

 

 

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Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey Sanctuary

 

 

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Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey Sanctuary

 

 

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Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey Sanctuary

 

 

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Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey Sanctuary

 

 

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Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey Sanctuary – HORNBILLS

 

 

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Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey Sanctuary – HORNBILL

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Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey Sanctuary

 

 

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Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey Sanctuary

 

 

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Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey Sanctuary

 

 

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Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey Sanctuary – Silver Leaf Monkey

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Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey Sanctuary – Silver Leaf Monkey

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BORNEAN SUN BEAR CONSERVATION CENTER (BSBCC)

The little-known sun bear (Helarctos malayanus) is the smallest bear species and the best tree climber. Their fondness for honey means they are sometimes named ‘honey bear’ or ‘beruang madu’ in Malay and Indonesian.
Once found throughout Asia, from India to Vietnam and China to Borneo, their numbers have decreased dramatically.

Their main threats are deforestation, commercial hunting and the pet trade. They are often found in appalling conditions; without a home, a mother, or left to rot in tiny cages.

The mission of the Bornean Sun Bear Conservation Centre (BSBCC) is to rescue these sun bears and promote their conservation to return sun bears to the forest.

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BORNEAN SUN BEAR CONSERVATION CENTER

 

 

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BORNEAN SUN BEAR CONSERVATION CENTER

 

 

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BORNEAN SUN BEAR CONSERVATION CENTER

 

 

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BORNEAN SUN BEAR CONSERVATION CEN

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BORNEAN SUN BEAR CONSERVATION CENTER

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BORNEAN SUN BEAR CONSERVATION CENTER

 

 

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BORNEAN SUN BEAR CONSERVATION CENTER

 

 

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BORNEAN SUN BEAR CONSERVATION CENTER

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BORNEAN SUN BEAR CONSERVATION CENTER

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MANUKAN ISLAND

Manukan Island (Pulau Manukan) is the second largest island in the Tunku Abdul Rahman National Park, Malaysia’s first marine national park. It is located in the East Malaysian state ofSabah, just off the coast of Kota Kinabalu and is easily accessible by boat.
Manukan is the most popular island with Kota Kinabalu residents. Manukan has some good stretches of beaches on the southern coastline. The best beach is on the eastern tip of the island. Offshore of Manukan are coral reefs, which is ideal for snorkelling, diving and swimming.
Out of the 5 islands making up Tunku Abdul Rahman National Park, Manukan features the most developed tourist facilities that includes 20 units of chalets, a clubhouse, and few restaurants and a diving centre. Recreation facilities include a swimming pool, football field, Volleyball and Sepak Takraw courts. Infrastructural facilities include support-water, electricity, desalination plant,sewerage system, and even a solar public telephone. It is covered in dense vegetation and has hiking trails.
Jesselton Point Ferry Terminal in downtown Kota Kinabalu is the ferry terminal for those heading to the islands in Tunku Abdul Rahman National Park. This ferry terminal is also the departure point for patrons staying at the Manukan Island Resort.
Before the Ice Age, the island formed part of the Crocker Range mass of sandstone and sedimentary rock on the mainland. However, about one million years ago, the melting ice brought about changes in the sea level and parts of the mainland were cut off by the sea to form the islands of Gaya Island, Sapi IslandManukan Island, Mamutik Island and Sulug Island. Evidence of this can be seen from the exposed sandstone of the coastline forming the cliffs, caves, honeycombs and deep crevices.
Jesselton Point Ferry Terminal in downtown Kota Kinabalu is the ferry terminal for those heading to the islands in Tunku Abdul Rahman Marine Park (Gaya Island, Sapi IslandManukan Island, Mamutik Island and Sulug Island). This ferry terminal is also the departure point for patrons staying at either Manukan Island Resort or Gayana Resort.
In 1974, the major part of Pulau Gaya and Pulau Sapi was gazetted as Tunku Abdul Rahman National Park, covering an area of 8,990 acres (36.4 km2). In 1979, the park was increased to 12,185 acres (49.31 km2) with the inclusion of the three nearby islands of Pulau Manukan, Pulau Mamutik and Pulau Sulug.
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MANUKAN ISLAND

 

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MANUKAN ISLAND

 

 

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MANUKAN ISLAND

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MANUKAN ISLAND

 

 

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MANUKAN ISLAND

 

 

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MANUKAN ISLAND

 

 

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MANUKAN ISLAND RESORT

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MANUKAN ISLAND – MONITOR LIZARD

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

Inanam, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Borneo,  Malaysia

A visit to Mari Mari Cultural Village is to experience some authentic Sabahan tribal ways of life: poison dart blowpiping, traditional cooking methods, traditional bamboo dance etc.

Mari Mari Cultural Village features 5 different ethnic tribes in one village. They are the rice farmer Kadazan-Dusun (mainly Catholic), the longhouse resident Rungus, the hunters and fisherman Lundayeh, the cowboy and sea gypsey Bajau (Muslim), and the famously feared headhunting tribe Muru. 

Each tribe has its house showing their living quarter, kitchen and an outdoor area where they make rice wine,  etc.Mari Mari Cultural village which is situated in a lush tropical rainforest which is  fairly far away from the hustling and bustling Kota Kinabalu.

It does give visitors detailed information of each tribe in Sabah.There are a few interesting activities during the visit like Blow pipe experience, jumping on the Bamboo Trampoline , tattooing etc.

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

 

 

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

 

 

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

 

 

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

 

 

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

 

 

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

 

 

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

 

 

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

 

 

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

 

 

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

 

 

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE – MAKING FIRE

 

 

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

 

 

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

 

 

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

 

 

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

 

 

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

 

 

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

 

 

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

 

 

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

 

 

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

 

 

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MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

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VIDEO:

MARI MARI CULTURAL VILLAGE

MURUT TRADITIONAL BAMBOO DANCE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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