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TRONDHEIM, GEIRANGER, LOM AND LILLEHAMMER, NORWAY – PART FOUR

September 6, 2015

TRONDHEIM, NORWAY

FROM MAY 26 TO JUNE 9, 2015  LEONARD EPSTEIN AND JANELLE BURGESS, TRAVELED THROUGH FINLAND AND NORWAY   PART FOUR

TRONDHEIM

Trondheim, Norway is a beautiful city, an established port, the former home of the Norwegian Royal Family, and a busy college town.

Trondheim, Norway’s third largest city, is also one of the country’s oldest. Founded as a trading post by the Vikings in 997 AD, it has the distinction of having been Norway’s capital until 1217. Built on a peninsula and linked to the mainland at its west end, Trondheim is the main town of the county of Sør-Trøndelag in central Norway. Popular as both a cultural and shopping destination, the city’s downtown core is scattered with quaint specialty shops as well as larger retailers around the pedestrian-only Nordre and Olav Tryggvasons gates (or streets). Like much of Norway – at least the northernmost regions – Trondheim experiences no darkness from mid-May to mid-July, and while it benefits from a mainly mild maritime climate, good skiing can be had in the surrounding areas.

The city celebrated its 1000th anniversary in 1997 but, contrary to popular belief, Trondheim was not so much of a center for the Vikings, as it was founded at the end of the Viking Age. However, it was the religious center of northern Europe during the Middle Ages and a vital hub for North Atlantic trade, giving it plenty of characteristic mansions and harbor houses. For centuries, Trondheim was the northernmost mercantile city in Europe, giving it a special “edge-of-the-world” feeling. This also resulted in a more outgoing international culture than many other Scandinavian cities at the time. The inhabitants like to call their city the historical, religious, and technological capital of Norway.

 

NIDAROS CATHEDRAL

Nidarosdomen  is the biggest church of Northern Europe and the only major gothic cathedral in Norway, and the pride of the city. Towering over the city centre at its southern edge, the majestic cathedral is the defining feature of Trondheim. Nidarosdomen is also Norway’s national cathedral. It was erected over what was believed to be St.Olav’s grave and it became a major pilgrimage site in Northern Europe. Next door is the Archbishop’s Palace, which was partly burnt down in the 80’s, and has been heavily restored. It houses an archeological museum, which includes an excavated Mint workshop for the minting of coins.

Built by King Olav Kyrre (1066-93) over the tomb of Norway’s patron saint, St Olav, Nidaros Cathedral is widely regarded as the most magnificent church in Scandinavia. The cathedral is undoubtedly the jewel in the city’s crown and one of the top tourist attractions. Kings have been christened and buried here, and since 1814 it’s been a requirement of the Norwegian constitution that the monarch should be crowned in Trondheim Cathedral.

The transept and chapterhouse are in a late Romanesque style influenced by the Norman architecture of England, while the long choir with its beautiful south doorway was added in the 13th Century, along with the massive nave and tower. After being damaged by fire three times over the centuries – in 1531, 1708 and 1719 – the whole western half of the church was reduced to ruins

NIDAROS CATHEDRAL - During the Middle Ages, and again after independence was restored in 1814, the Nidaros Cathedral was the coronation church of the Norwegian kings. King Haakon VII was the last monarch to be crowned there, in 1906. Starting with King Olav V in 1957, coronation was replaced by consecration. In 1991, the present King Harald V and Queen Sonja were consecrated in the cathedral. On 24 May 2002, their daughter Princess Märtha Louise married the writer Ari Behn in the cathedral.

NIDAROS CATHEDRAL – During the Middle Ages, and again after independence was restored in 1814, the Nidaros Cathedral was the coronation church of the Norwegian kings. King Haakon VII was the last monarch to be crowned there, in 1906. Starting with King Olav V in 1957, coronation was replaced by consecration. In 1991, the present King Harald V and Queen Sonja were consecrated in the cathedral. On 24 May 2002, their daughter Princess Märtha Louise married the writer Ari Behn in the cathedral.

NIDAROS CATHEDRAL (DETAIL)

NIDAROS CATHEDRAL (DETAIL)

NIDAROS CATHEDRAL (SIDE VIEW)

NIDAROS CATHEDRAL (SIDE VIEW)

NIDAROS CATHEDRAL

NIDAROS CATHEDRAL

NIDAROS CATHEDRAL - CEMETARY HEADSTONE

NIDAROS CATHEDRAL – CEMETARY HEADSTONE

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Archbishop’s Palace Museum includes original sculptures from and archaeological finds from nearby Nidaros Cathedral.

ARCHBSHOP'S PALACE

ARCHBISHOP’S PALACE

ARCHBISHOP'S PALACE

ARCHBISHOP’S PALACE

ARCHBISHOP'S PALACE

ARCHBISHOP’S PALACE

ARCHBISHOP'S PALACE

ARCHBISHOP’S PALACE

ARCHBISHOP'S PALACE

ARCHBISHOP’S PALACE   (COMMEMORATIVE  MANHOLE COVER)

STIFTSGARDEN - Stiftsgården is the royal residence in Trondheim, built in 1774 by Cecilie Christine Schøller, architect is believed to be Admiral Christian Lerche. Stiftsgården is the largest wooden palace in Northern Europe.

STIFTSGARDEN – Stiftsgården is the royal residence in Trondheim, built in 1774 by Cecilie Christine Schøller, architect is believed to be Admiral Christian Lerche. Stiftsgården is the largest wooden palace in Northern Europe.

KUNSTIDUSTRI MUSEUM - Nordenfjeldske Kunstindustrimuseum - National Museum of Decorative Arts

KUNSTIDUSTRI MUSEUM – Nordenfjeldske Kunstindustrimuseum – National Museum of Decorative Arts

TRONDHEIM COURTHOUSE---Entrance to Trondheim Tinghus, the town courthouse

TRONDHEIM COURTHOUSE—Entrance to Trondheim Tinghus, the town courthouse

HOUSE ON MUNKEGETA, TRONDHEIM'S MAIN STREET

HOUSE ON MUNKEGETA, TRONDHEIM’S MAIN STREET

 OLAV - Market Square (Torget). One of the attractions is the tall octagonal column in the center of the square: built in 1923, it bears a statue of Olav Tryggvason, King of Norway from 995 to 1000 and widely regarded as Trondheim's founder.

OLAV – Market Square (Torget). One of the attractions is the tall octagonal column in the center of the square: built in 1923, it bears a statue of Olav Tryggvason, King of Norway from 995 to 1000 and widely regarded as Trondheim’s founder.

KONG OLAV (DETAIL)

KING OLAV (DETAIL)

TRONDHEIM MARKET SQUARE

TRONDHEIM MARKET SQUARE

FRIMURER LOGEN - TRONDHEIM COCERT VENUE

FRIMURER LOGEN – TRONDHEIM CONCERT VENUE

NARVESEN - Narvesen is a Norwegian chain of convenience stores/news agents, and is one of Norway's largest convenience store chains with 370 stores. Narvesen was established in 1894 by Bertrand Narvesen and has been owned by the Reitan Group since 2000

NARVESEN – Narvesen is a Norwegian chain of convenience stores/news agents, and is one of Norway’s largest convenience store chains with 370 stores. Narvesen was established in 1894 by Bertrand Narvesen and has been owned by the Reitan Group since 2000

OLD TRONDHEIM BRIDGE

OLD TRONDHEIM BRIDGE

OLD TRONDHEIM BRIDGE

OLD TRONDHEIM BRIDGE

TRONDHEIM - OLD MERCHANT WAREHOUSES

TRONDHEIM – OLD MERCHANT WAREHOUSES

BANK OF NORWAY

BANK OF NORWAY

NARVESEN - Narvesen is a Norwegian chain of convenience stores/news agents, and is one of Norway's largest convenience store chains with 370 stores. Narvesen was established in 1894 by Bertrand Narvesen and has been owned by the Reitan Group since 2000

NARVESEN – Narvesen is a Norwegian chain of convenience stores/news agents, and is one of Norway’s largest convenience store chains with 370 stores. Narvesen was established in 1894 by Bertrand Narvesen and has been owned by the Reitan Group since 2000

TRONDHEIM - OLD WOODEN HOUSE

TRONDHEIM – OLD WOODEN HOUSE

TRONDHEIM - OLD WOODEN HOUSE WITH A NUMBER OF RESTAURANTS

TRONDHEIM – OLD WOODEN HOUSE WITH A NUMBER OF RESTAURANTS

TRONDHEIM - OLD WOODEN BUILDING

TRONDHEIM – OLD WOODEN BUILDING

TWO PLAYFUL DEER IN FRONT OF THE Stiftsgården, the royal residence

TWO PLAYFUL DEER IN FRONT OF THE STIFTSGARDEN, THE ROYAL RESIDENCE

—————————

THE ATLANTIC OCEAN ROAD

Located in the midwest part of the Norwegian coastline, the Atlantic Road, with a length of 8274 meters (5,1 miles), is part of Norwegian national road 64 (Rv 64). It’s a very popular tourist attraction in the country. The road includes 8 bridges with a total length of 891 metres. The construction of the road started on August 1983 and it took six years to be finished.

Driving along the Atlantic Road is like teetering on the edge of the sea. This road has been heralded as one of the most spectaculars roads in the world by the dangerousroads.org users. It links the towns of Kristiansund and Molde, the two main population centers in the county of Møre og Romsdal in Fjord Norway. It starts approximately 30 kilometers southwest of Kristiansund and ends 47 kilometers north of Molde. The road’s roller coaster-feel, curvy bridges and phenomenal views have made it a favorite of road trippers and motorcyclists. It was also designated a Cultural Heritage Site, is considered a National Tourist Route, and has been recognized as the Norwegian Construction of the Century. It’s one of the famous scenic drives in Norway.

The road includes 8 bridges with a total length of 891 metres. The construction of the road started on August 1983 and the construction took six years. It was opened on 7 July 1989. During construction the area was hit by 12 European windstorms.The road was opened on July, 7th 1989. Nowadays the road is toll-free. The surface of the road is asphalt. The road had a cost of 122 million Norwegian krone. The Atlanterhavsveien is built on several small islands and is spanned by eight bridges and several landfills.

The road’s winding design, providing stunning panoramic views, is very curvy and fun for a leisurely ride, so it pays to take it slow. The Atlantic Road zigzags across low bridges that jut out over the sea, linking the islands between Molde (famous for its annual jazz festival in July) and Kristiansund in the western fjords. The Hustadvika is an infamous stretch of ocean and when in storm it is truly dramatic. In calmer weather you might spot whales and seals.

The weather on this zone is harsh and highly unpredictable and it does not take much time for the bright sun shine to change over to moderate to heavy snow fall. A sudden drop in the temperature, even in summer, can trigger winter-like conditions. The 8.3 km (5 mile) road is built on several small islands and skerries, and is spanned by eight bridges and several landfills. This road has an open sea view which is not so common for roads along the Norwegian coast. Here the distance between the islands was so small that a road could be built across the archipelago. In addition there are fjords and mountains inside the road.

The weather on this zone is harsh and highly unpredictable and it does not take much time for the bright sun shine to change over to moderate to heavy snow fall. The biggest fear is the wind, which often exceeds 30 miles per hour on the bridge. It has taxed the nerves of more than a few drivers. The bridge becomes a a truly treacherous drive during storms. Many people have a fear that when they drive over a bridge, they’ll end up in the water.

This amazing destination that each driver should visit was originally envisioned as a railway, but the plans never managed to materialize. The Atlantic Road meanders at the ocean’s edge, from island to island, across bridges and rock-fills. Visitors frequently use the road to go fishing for cod and other fish directly from the bridges. One of the bridges is special designed for fishing.

THE ATLANTIC OCEAN ROAD

THE ATLANTIC OCEAN ROAD

THE ATLANTIC OCEAN ROAD

THE ATLANTIC OCEAN ROAD

THE ATLANTIC OCEAN ROAD

THE ATLANTIC OCEAN ROAD

THE ATLANTIC OCEAN ROAD

THE ATLANTIC OCEAN ROAD

———————–

GEIRANGER

Geiranger is a small tourist village in Sunnmøre region of Møre og Romsdal county in the western part of Norway. It lies in Stranda Municipality at the head of the Geirangerfjorden, which is a branch of the large Storfjorden. The nearest city is Ålesund. Geiranger is home to some of the most spectacular scenery in the world, and has been named the best travel destination in Scandinavia by Lonely Planet. Since 2005, the Geirangerfjord area has been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Seven Sisters waterfall is located just west of Geiranger. Norwegian County Road 63 passes through the village. Geiranger Church is the main church for the village and surrounding area.

Geiranger is under constant threat from the mountain Åkerneset which could erode into the fjord. A collapse could cause a tsunami that could destroy downtown Geiranger.

This third biggest cruise ship port in Norway receives 140 to 180 ships during the four-month tourist season. In 2012 some 300,000 cruise passengers visited Geiranger during the summer season. Several hundred thousand people pass through every summer, and tourism is the main business for the 250 people who live there permanently. There are five hotels and over ten camping sites. The tourist season stretches from May to early September. Tours of the nearby historic farms of Knivsflå and Skageflå are available from Geiranger.

Each year in June, the Geiranger – From Fjord to Summit event occurs. It comprises a half marathon run and a bicycle race, both starting from the sea level at the fjord and ending at the 1,497 metres (4,911 ft) summit of Mount Dalsnibba, near the lake Djupvatnet. Since there is still a lot of snow left in the mountains at that time of year, the race is also called “From Summer to Winter”.

Magdalene Thoresen, Henrik Ibsen’s mother-in-law, said of the area:

“This fjord is surrounded by the steepest and, one is almost tempted to say, the most
preposterous mountains on the entire west coast. It is very narrow and has no habitable shore area, for the precipitous heights rise in sheer and rugged strata almost straight out of the water. Foaming waterfalls plunge into the fjord from jagged peaks. There are, however, a few mountain farms here, and of these one or two have such hazardous access, by paths that wind around steep precipices, and by bridges that are fixed to the mountain with iron bolts and rings, that they bear witness in a most striking way to the remarkable powers of invention which the challenges of nature have developed in man.”

GEIRANGER

GEIRANGER

GEIRANGER

GEIRANGER

GEIRANGER

GEIRANGER

TOURISTS TAKE PHOTOS OF GEIRANGER

TOURISTS TAKE PHOTOS OF GEIRANGER

TOURISTS TAKE PHOTOS OF GEIRANGER

TOURISTS TAKE PHOTOS OF GEIRANGER

TOURISTS TAKE PHOTOS OF GEIRANGER

TOURISTS TAKE PHOTOS OF GEIRANGER

GEIRANGER

GEIRANGER

GEIRANGER A VIEW FROM THE DOCK

GEIRANGER A VIEW FROM THE DOCK

GEIRANGER A VIEW FROM THE DOCK

GEIRANGER A VIEW FROM THE DOCK

GEIRANGER A VIEW FROM THE DOCK

GEIRANGER A VIEW FROM THE DOCK

IN ORDER FOR BUSES TO GET TO GEIRANGER THEY MUST NEGOTIATE HAIRPIN TURNS TO GET TO THE BOTTOM.

IN ORDER FOR BUSES TO GET TO GEIRANGER THEY MUST NEGOTIATE HAIRPIN TURNS TO GET TO THE BOTTOM.

IN ORDER FOR BUSES TO GET TO GEIRANGER THEY MUST NEGOTIATE HAIRPIN TURNS TO GET TO THE BOTTOM.

IN ORDER FOR BUSES TO GET TO GEIRANGER THEY MUST NEGOTIATE HAIRPIN TURNS TO GET TO THE BOTTOM.

GEIRANGER - SIGN FOR FJORD SIGHT SEEING BOAT

GEIRANGER

GEIRANGER - SIGN FOR A FJORD SIGHTSEEING BOAT

GEIRANGER – SIGN FOR A FJORD SIGHTSEEING BOAT

THE SEVEN SISTERS WATERFALL - The ”Seven Sisters” are among the most photographed waterfalls in Geirangerfjorden. They are close to Knivsflå, the abandoned farm. No less than seven waterfalls descend into the fjord. They have an average fall of around 250 meters and are an impressive sight when the water levels are high. The water level is dependent on the snow thaw and precipitation and may affect whether it is possible to see all seven falls equally clearly. The falls are naturally more visible during the major snow melting period in May-July and can be best observed by taking a boat trip on Geirangerfjord. The legend has it that the ”Seven Sisters” were all unmarried, and the waterfall on the other side of the fjord has been called ”The Suitor” after several unsuccessful attempts to court the sisters.

THE SEVEN SISTERS WATERFALL – The ”Seven Sisters” are among the most photographed waterfalls in Geirangerfjorden. They are close to Knivsflå, the abandoned farm. No less than seven waterfalls descend into the fjord. They have an average fall of around 250 meters and are an impressive sight when the water levels are high.
The water level is dependent on the snow thaw and precipitation and may affect whether it is possible to see all seven falls equally clearly. The falls are naturally more visible during the major snow melting period in May-July and can be best observed by taking a boat trip on Geirangerfjord.
The legend has it that the ”Seven Sisters” were all unmarried, and the waterfall on the other side of the fjord has been called ”The Suitor” after several unsuccessful attempts to court the sisters.

BRIDAL VEILS WATERFALLS

BRIDAL VEILS WATERFALLS

————

GEIRANGER CHURCH

Geiranger Church is a parish church in Stranda Municipality in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. It is located in the village of Geiranger, and the end of the famous Geirangerfjorden. The church is part of the Geiranger parish in the Austre Sunnmøre deanery in the Diocese of Møre. The white, wooden, octagonal church was built in 1842 by the architect Hans Klipe. The church seats about 114 people. The church is the third building on the site. The first building dates back to around 1450 and it was torn down and replaced in 1731. The second church lasted until it burned on 2 July 1841. The third and current church was completed in 1842.

GEIRANGER CHURCH

GEIRANGER CHURCH

GEIRANGER CHURCH

GEIRANGER CHURCH

——————-

LOM

Lom is a municipality in Oppland county, Norway. It is part of the traditional region of Gudbrandsdal. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Fossbergom. The municipality of Lom was established on 1 January 1838 (see formannskapsdistrikt). The area of Skjåk was separated from Lom to become a municipality of its own in 1866.

Lom is famous for its extensive history, for having one of the few remaining stave churches in Norway, and for lying in the midst of the highest mountains in Northern Europe.

An ancient trade route passed up from Sunnmøre through Lom and Skjåk and down the Gudbrandsdal into the Østlandet. The trade consisted of fish and salt heading inland, and grain heading to the coast.

The Saga of Olaf Haraldson relates that St. Olaf commented as he first looked down on Lom, “What a pity to have to lay waste to such a beautiful valley.” In the face of such a clear motivation, the residents of the valley converted (it has since been a recurring discussion whether he looked to Lom or the neighbouring municipality Skjåk, at the time a part of Lom.) St. Olafs-stuggu, a building were St. Olaf is reported to have spent a night in 1021, can still be found here. The building is part of the Presthaugen District Museum.

Lom stave church, which is located at Lom center, is believed to have been built in 1158, making 2008 the 850th anniversary. It was extended in 1634, with further addition of two naves in 1667. It is believed that the church was originally surrounded by a circumambulatory passage, like many other Norwegian stave churches, but that this passage was removed when the two side wings were added. A few Runic inscriptions can be still be seen in the church. The church also contains numerous paintings from the 17th and 18th centuries with religious motifs. Many of the paintings were made by local artist Eggert Munch, a distant relation of the famous Edvard Munch. The church also contains numerous examples of local woodcarving, as seen in the elaborate acanthus scrolls adorning the pulpit. Carved dragon figures on the roof are old symbols of protection against evil. It is still in use as the local church.

HERE ARE SOME PHOTOS OF THE STAVE CHURCH:

LOM STAVE CHURCH

LOM STAVE CHURCH

LOM STAVE CHURCH

LOM STAVE CHURCH

LOM STAVE CHURCH

LOM STAVE CHURCH

LOM STAVE CHURCH

LOM STAVE CHURCH

LOM STAVE CHURCH

LOM STAVE CHURCH

LOM STAVE CHURCH

LOM STAVE CHURCH

LOM STAVE CHURCH

LOM STAVE CHURCH

LOM STAVE CHURCH

LOM STAVE CHURCH

LOM STAVE CHURCH

LOM STAVE CHURCH

LOM STAVE CHURCH

LOM STAVE CHURCH

LOM STAVE CHURCH

LOM STAVE CHURCH

———–

AT THE STAVE CHURCH IS A STATUE OF OLAV AUKRUST

OLAV AUKRUST - Olav Aukrust (21 January 1883 – 3 November 1929) was a Norwegian poet and teacher. He was born in Lom and wrote poems with a renewed national romantic style. His use of rural dialect contributed to the growth of Nynorsk as a literary language. He was born in Lom as a son of Olav Olavsson Aukrust (1851–1931) and Mari Pålsdatter Andvord (1864–1936). He was a brother of Lars Olsen Aukrust and uncle of Odd, Kjell and Tor Aukrust. He was married to Gudrun Blekastad.[1] He was strongly influenced by Ivar Mortensson-Egnund, and used a characteristically similar form. Until 1917, he worked as a teacher at the folk high school for Dovre (1915–17) where his friend Ingeborg Møller was a teacher, as well as in Gausdal. He suffered from tuberculosis, which came to characterize his last year and led to an early death. Olav Aukrust joined the Anthroposophical Society in December 1921 after he and his wife, Gudrun Aukrust, traveled through Goetheanum on their way home from Italy.

OLAV AUKRUST – Olav Aukrust (21 January 1883 – 3 November 1929) was a Norwegian poet and teacher. He was born in Lom and wrote poems with a renewed national romantic style. His use of rural dialect contributed to the growth of Nynorsk as a literary language.
He was born in Lom as a son of Olav Olavsson Aukrust (1851–1931) and Mari Pålsdatter Andvord (1864–1936). He was a brother of Lars Olsen Aukrust and uncle of Odd, Kjell and Tor Aukrust. He was married to Gudrun Blekastad.[1]
He was strongly influenced by Ivar Mortensson-Egnund, and used a characteristically similar form. Until 1917, he worked as a teacher at the folk high school for Dovre (1915–17) where his friend Ingeborg Møller was a teacher, as well as in Gausdal. He suffered from tuberculosis, which came to characterize his last year and led to an early death.
Olav Aukrust joined the Anthroposophical Society in December 1921 after he and his wife, Gudrun Aukrust, traveled through Goetheanum on their way home from Italy.

——————————-

LILLEHAMMER

Lillehammer is best remembered as the site of the 1994 Winter Olympics, but it’s also worth a visit in the summer for its beautifully preserved late 19th-century wooden houses.

Lillehammer is on the shores of Lake Mjøsa, with the bulk of town on the east bank. From the train station it’s just two blocks to Storgata, the main pedestrian shopping street in the heart of the old city center.

Lillehammer (25.000 inhabitants), considered Norway’s oldest winter sports resort and host of the 1994 Winter Olympics. Lillehammer region provides you with a combination of long-standing tradition and modern activities and services. You will find excellent museums and galleries, Olympic venues, a large number of restaurants and wide selection of shops and accommodation. The Lillehammer region is also famous for its ski terrain and excellent winter sport facilities. Nearby at Nordseter and Sjusjøen, you will find the best network of cross-country ski trails in Northern Europe, comprising 350 km. The excellent ski centre is located at Hafjell, 15 minutes away by ski bus, and offers a mountain village feel with full amenities and ski in/out accommodation.

HERE ARE SOME PHOTOS OF LILLEHAMMER:

LILLEHAMMER SKI JUMP

LILLEHAMMER SKI JUMP

LOOKING DOWN FROM THE SKI JUMP TOWARD LILLEHAMMER

LOOKING DOWN FROM THE SKI JUMP TOWARD LILLEHAMMER

LOOKING DOWN FROM THE SKI JUMP TOWARD LILLEHAMMER

LOOKING DOWN FROM THE SKI JUMP TOWARD LILLEHAMMER

LILLEHAMMER STANDS AT THE SKI JUMP

LILLEHAMMER STANDS AT THE SKI JUMP

LILLEHAMMER

LILLEHAMMER

LILLEHAMMER - TOWN CENTER

LILLEHAMMER – TOWN CENTER

LILLEHAMMER

LILLEHAMMER

LILLEHAMMER RESTAURANT

LILLEHAMMER RESTAURANT

LILLEHAMMER - RESTAURANT

LILLEHAMMER – RESTAURANT

LILLEHAMMER

LILLEHAMMER

LILLEHAMMER

LILLEHAMMER

LILLEHAMMER - SIGVARD LARSEN - POLICE OFFICER -

LILLEHAMMER – SIGVARD LARSEN – POLICE OFFICER – ” Sigvard Larsen saw the police as part of the social security system. The police and the public should go in tandem – against crime.”

LILLEHAMMER

LILLEHAMMER

LILLEHAMMER

LILLEHAMMER

LILLEHAMMER - RESTAURANT

LILLEHAMMER – RESTAURANT

LILLEHAMMER

LILLEHAMMER

LILLEHAMMER

LILLEHAMMER

LUDVIG WIESE - FIRST MAYOR OF LILLEHAMMER

LUDVIG WIESE – FIRST MAYOR OF LILLEHAMMER

LILLEHAMMER CHURCH BUILT IN 1882

LILLEHAMMER CHURCH BUILT IN 1882

————————–

EIDSVOLL

Eidsvoll is a town in Norway. In every Norwegian patriot’s heart beats for being the site of the signing of the modern Norwegian constitution in 1814, an important step towards full independence from the country’s neighbors.

EIDSVOLL MANOR -- The Eidsvoll Building is where the National Assembly convened in 1814, created the most liberal constitution of the time and ratified it on May 17th. This is the base of the celebration of Norway's National Day. The Eidsvoll Building therefore plays a central role in the history of Norway, and thus it is one of the most well-known buildings of the country.

EIDSVOLL MANOR — The Eidsvoll Building is where the National Assembly convened in 1814, created the most liberal constitution of the time and ratified it on May 17th. This is the base of the celebration of Norway’s National Day. The Eidsvoll Building therefore plays a central role in the history of Norway, and thus it is one of the most well-known buildings of the country.

NORWEIGIAN CONSTITUTION

NORWEIGIAN CONSTITUTION

EIDSVOLL STATUE OF HENRIK WERGELAND - Henrik Arnold Thaulow Wergeland (17 June 1808 – 12 July 1845) was a Norwegian writer, most celebrated for his poetry but also a prolific playwright, polemicist, historian, and linguist. He is often described as a leading pioneer in the development of a distinctly Norwegian literary heritage and of modern Norwegian culture. Though Wergeland only lived to be 37, his range of PURSUITS covered literature, theology, history, contemporary politics, social issues, and science. His views were controversial in his time, and his literary style was variously denounced as subversive.

EIDSVOLL STATUE OF HENRIK WERGELAND – Henrik Arnold Thaulow Wergeland (17 June 1808 – 12 July 1845) was a Norwegian writer, most celebrated for his poetry but also a prolific playwright, polemicist, historian, and linguist. He is often described as a leading pioneer in the development of a distinctly Norwegian literary heritage and of modern Norwegian culture.
Though Wergeland only lived to be 37, his range of PURSUITS covered literature, theology, history, contemporary politics, social issues, and science. His views were controversial in his time, and his literary style was variously denounced as subversive.

EIDSVOLL VILLAGE

EIDSVOLL VILLAGE

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