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HELSINKI, FINLAND – PART ONE

July 8, 2015

HELSINKI, FINLAND    –    PART ONE

FROM MAY 26 TO JUNE 9, 2015  LEONARD EPSTEIN AND JANELLE BURGESS, TRAVELED THROUGH FINLAND AND NORWAY.

HELSINKI, FINLAND Helsinki (Finnish) or Helsingfors (Swedish) is the capital of Finland. Founded in 1550, the “Daughter of the Baltic” has been the Finnish capital since 1812, when it was rebuilt by the tsars of Russia along the lines of a miniature St. Petersburg, a role it has played in many Cold War movies. Today, Helsinki pulls off the trick of being something of an international metropolis while still retaining a small-town feel. The best time to visit is in summer, when Finns peel off their overcoats and flock to outdoor bars and cafes to enjoy the sunshine. Helsinki’s current population is about 604,380, but the Greater Helsinki region including the suburbs of the neighboring administrative areas of Espoo and Vantaa has a population of over 1.3 million. Helsinki was founded in A.D. 1550 by King Gustav Vasa of Sweden as a trading post to compete with Tallinn to the south in Estonia, which was Danish at that time. The growth of the city was slow until the establishment of Sveaborg (nowadays Suomenlinna) Maritime Fortress in the front of Helsinki in the middle of 18th century. In 1809, Finland was annexed by Russia during a war of that period and the capital of Finland moved from Turku to Helsinki in 1812. The Czar felt the Grand Duchy of Finland needed a capital of grand proportions. The architects Johan Albrecht Ehrenström, a native Finn, and Carl Ludwig Engel, from Germany, were given the task of rebuilding the city in the Empire style. This can be seen today around the Lutheran Cathedral, which was completed in 1852. The same style, and even architects, is also a part of Saint PPetersburg’s history. Though thoroughly a Nordic capital, Helsinki today reflects the influences gained from the Western and Eastern cultures. HERE ARE SOME PHOTOS OF HELSINKI:

SENATE SQUARE WITH THE LUTHERAN CATHEDRAL IN THE BACK GROUND

SENATE SQUARE WITH THE LUTHERAN CATHEDRAL IN THE BACK GROUND

SENATE SQUARE SIGN

SENATE SQUARE SIGN

SENATE SQUARE SIGN (DETAIL)

SENATE SQUARE SIGN (DETAIL)

LUTHERAN CATHEDRAL

LUTHERAN CATHEDRAL

LUTHERAN CATHEDRAL INTERIOR

LUTHERAN CATHEDRAL INTERIOR

LUTHRAN CATHEDRAL ORGAN PIPES

LUTHRAN CATHEDRAL ORGAN PIPES

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Statue of Alexander II

A statue of Emperor Alexander II is located in the center of the square. The statue, erected in 1894, was built to commemorate his re-establishment the Diet of Finland in 1863, as well as his initiation of several reforms that increased Finland’s autonomy from Russia. The statue comprises Alexander on a pedestal surrounded by figures representing the law, culture and the peasants. The sculptor was Walter Runeberg. During the Russification of Finland from 1899 onwards, the statue became a symbol of quiet resistance, with people of Helsinki protesting to the decrees of Nicholas II leaving flowers at the foot of the statue of his grandfather, then known in Finland as “the good czar”. After Finland’s independence in 1917, demands were made regarding the removal of the statue, and later, a suggestion was made that it should be replaced with the equestrian statue of Mannerheim (currently located along Mannerheimintie in front of the Kiasma museum). Nothing came of either of these suggestions, and today the statue is one of the major tourist landmarks on the city, standing as a monument to Finland’s relationship with Imperial Russia.

Senate Square Pedestal Monument To Alexander Ii Sculptures

Senate Square Pedestal Monument To Alexander Ii Sculptures

Senate Square Pedestal Monument To Alexander Ii Sculptures

Senate Square Pedestal Monument To Alexander Ii Sculptures

Senate Square Pedestal Monument To Alexander Ii Sculptures

Senate Square Pedestal Monument To Alexander Ii Sculptures

Senate Square Pedestal Monument To Alexander Ii Sculptures

Senate Square Pedestal Monument To Alexander Ii Sculptures

———- MARKET SQUARE  –  a block from the Lutheran Cathedral or the Uspenski Cathedral, is the open-air market square and sells fresh fish and produce from all over Finland. Here are some photos of these stalls

MARKET SQUARE

MARKET SQUARE

MARKET SQUARE

MARKET SQUARE

MARKET SQUARE

MARKET SQUARE

MARKET SQUARE

MARKET SQUARE

MARKET SQUARE

MARKET SQUARE

MARKET SQUARE

MARKET SQUARE

MARKET SQUARE

MARKET SQUARE

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USPENSKI CATHERDRAL - A classical onion-domed Russian church prominently located near the Market Square, Uspenski Cathedral serves Finland's small Orthodox minority and is the largest Orthodox church in Western Europe. The name comes from the Russian uspenie, from the Dormition (death) of the Virgin Mary. The five domes are topped with 22-carat gold, and some of the icons within are held to be miraculous.

USPENSKI CATHERDRAL – A classical onion-domed Russian church prominently located near the Market Square, Uspenski Cathedral serves Finland’s small Orthodox minority and is the largest Orthodox church in Western Europe. The name comes from the Russian uspenie, from the Dormition (death) of the Virgin Mary. The five domes are topped with 22-carat gold, and some of the icons within are held to be miraculous.

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 FINNAIR SKYWHEEL - NEAR MARKET SQUARE AT THE HARBOR

FINNAIR SKYWHEEL – NEAR MARKET SQUARE AT THE HARBOR

———- STOCKMANN DEPARTMENT STORE The Stockmann department store is a culturally significant business building and department store located in the centre of Helsinki, Finland. It is one of many department stores owned by the Stockmann corporation. Annually, about 17 million customers visit the store and it is thus the largest department store in Finland. It is also the largest department store in the Nordic countries in terms of area and total sales. The store is known for carrying all the internationally recognised luxury brands, and Stockmann’s enjoys a reputation as the primary high-end department store in Finland. “Stockmannin Herkku”, the food and beverage department located at the basement level, is renowned for the quality and choice of its foodstuffs. The Stockmann logo represents a set of escalators, which are commonly, but wrongly believed represent the first escalators in Finland. The first escalators in Finland were installed in the Forum department store, Turku.

STOCKMANN DEPARTMENT STORE

STOCKMANN DEPARTMENT STORE

STOCKMANN DEPARTMENT STORE

STOCKMANN DEPARTMENT STORE

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UNIVERSITY OF HELSINKI

UNIVERSITY OF HELSINKI STUDENT UNION BUILDING

GROTESK BAR - Grotesk is in the grand building that once housed Helsinki's daily newspaper.

GROTESK BAR – Grotesk is in the grand building that once housed Helsinki’s daily newspaper.

UNIVERSITY STUDENT UNION BUILDING

UNIVERSITY STUDENT UNION BUILDING

KYOSTI KALLIO - Kyösti Kallio was the fourth President of Finland. He was a prominent leader of the Agrarian League, and served as Prime Minister four times and Speaker of the Parliament six times

KYOSTI KALLIO – Kyösti Kallio was the fourth President of Finland. He was a prominent leader of the Agrarian League, and served as Prime Minister four times and Speaker of the Parliament six times

CARL GUSTAF EMIL MANNERHEIM - Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim (4 June 1867 – 27 January 1951) was a Finnish military leader and statesman. Mannerheim served as the military leader of the Whites in the Finnish Civil War, Regent of Finland (1918–1919), commander-in-chief of Finland's defence forces during World War II, Marshal of Finland, and the sixth president of Finland (1944–1946). In a Finnish survey 53 years after his death, Mannerheim was voted the greatest Finn of all time.Given the broad recognition in Finland and elsewhere of his unparalleled role in establishing and later preserving Finland's independence from Russia, Mannerheim has long been referred to as the father of modern Finland,and the Finnish capital Helsinki's Mannerheim Museum memorializing the leader's life and times has been called

CARL GUSTAF EMIL MANNERHEIM – Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim (4 June 1867 – 27 January 1951) was a Finnish military leader and statesman. Mannerheim served as the military leader of the Whites in the Finnish Civil War, Regent of Finland (1918–1919), commander-in-chief of Finland’s defence forces during World War II, Marshal of Finland, and the sixth president of Finland (1944–1946). In a Finnish survey 53 years after his death, Mannerheim was voted the greatest Finn of all time.Given the broad recognition in Finland and elsewhere of his unparalleled role in establishing and later preserving Finland’s independence from Russia, Mannerheim has long been referred to as the father of modern Finland,and the Finnish capital Helsinki’s Mannerheim Museum memorializing the leader’s life and times has been called “the closest thing there is to a [Finnish] national shrine.

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HELSINKI RAILWAY STATION

HELSINKI RAILWAY STATION

HELSINKI RAILWAY STATION (INTERIOR)

HELSINKI RAILWAY STATION (INTERIOR)

HELSINKI RAILWAY STATION (INTERIOR)

HELSINKI RAILWAY STATION (INTERIOR)

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HELSINKI SWEDISH THEATER

HELSINKI SWEDISH THEATER

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SIBELIUS MONUMENT - The Sibelius Monument (Finnish: Sibelius-monumentti) is dedicated to the Finnish composer Jean Sibelius (1865–1957). The monument is located at the Sibelius Park (Finnish: Sibeliuspuisto) in the district of Töölö in Helsinki, the capital city of Finland. The monument is a sculpture by Finnish artist Eila Hiltunen titled Passio Musicae[1] and unveiled on September 7, 1967. Originally it sparked a lively debate about the merits and flaws of abstract art, for which reason an effigy of Sibelius was included in the work. It consists of series of more than 600 hollow steel pipes welded together in a wave-like pattern. The purpose of the artist was to capture the essence of the music of Sibelius. The monument weighs 24 tonnes (24 long tons; 26 short tons) and measures 8.5 × 10.5 × 6.5 metres. A smaller version of the monument is located at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris. A work with a similar concept, also designed by Hiltunen, is located at the grounds of the United Nations headquarters in New York City.

SIBELIUS MONUMENT – The Sibelius Monument (Finnish: Sibelius-monumentti) is dedicated to the Finnish composer Jean Sibelius (1865–1957). The monument is located at the Sibelius Park (Finnish: Sibeliuspuisto) in the district of Töölö in Helsinki, the capital city of Finland.
The monument is a sculpture by Finnish artist Eila Hiltunen titled Passio Musicae[1] and unveiled on September 7, 1967. Originally it sparked a lively debate about the merits and flaws of abstract art, for which reason an effigy of Sibelius was included in the work. It consists of series of more than 600 hollow steel pipes welded together in a wave-like pattern. The purpose of the artist was to capture the essence of the music of Sibelius. The monument weighs 24 tonnes (24 long tons; 26 short tons) and measures 8.5 × 10.5 × 6.5 metres.
A smaller version of the monument is located at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris. A work with a similar concept, also designed by Hiltunen, is located at the grounds of the United Nations headquarters in New York City.

JEAN SIBELIUS - HELSINKI, FINLAND - The Sibelius Monument honors the composer with an abstract sculpture and a bust Jean Sibelius. It is located in Sibelius Park, north and west of the city center in Helsinki.

JEAN SIBELIUS – HELSINKI, FINLAND – The Sibelius Monument honors the composer with an abstract sculpture and a bust Jean Sibelius. It is located in Sibelius Park, north and west of the city center in Helsinki.

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THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF FINLAND - The National Museum of Finland presents Finnish history from the Stone Age to the present day, through objects and cultural history

THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF FINLAND – The National Museum of Finland presents Finnish history from the Stone Age to the present day, through objects and cultural history

THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF FINLAND (DETAIL) The National Museum of Finland presents Finnish history from the Stone Age to the present day, through objects and cultural history

THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF FINLAND (DETAIL) The National Museum of Finland presents Finnish history from the Stone Age to the present day, through objects and cultural history

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HELSINKI SCULPTURE - 100 YEARS OF DEMOCRACY 1915 - 2015

HELSINKI SCULPTURE – 100 YEARS OF DEMOCRACY 1915 – 2015

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HELSINKI APARTMENT BUILDING

HELSINKI APARTMENT BUILDING

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HELSINKI TRAM

HELSINKI TRAM

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HELSINKI - ADVERTISEMENT FOR A JAZZ FESTIVAL

HELSINKI – ADVERTISEMENT FOR A JAZZ FESTIVAL

PHOTOS; LEONARD EPSTEIN

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