Skip to content

THE GREAT OCEAN ROAD, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA

March 27, 2015

THE GREAT OCEAN ROAD

The Great Ocean Road is an Australian National Heritage listed 243 kilometres (151 mi) stretch of road along the south-eastern coast of Australia between the Victorian cities of Torquay and Allansford. Built by returned soldiers between 1919 and 1932 and dedicated to soldiers killed during World War I, the road is the world’s largest war memorial. Winding through varying terrain along the coast and providing access to several prominent landmarks, including the Twelve Apostles limestone stack formations, the road is an important tourist attraction in the region.

The Great Ocean Road was first planned towards the end of the first world war, when chairman of the Country Roads Board, William Calder, asked the State War Council for funds to be provided for returned soldiers to work on roads in sparsely populated areas in the Western District.By the time of World War I, the rugged south-west coast of Victoria was accessible only by sea or rough bush track. Besides being dedicated as a memorial, it was also envisaged that the road would connect isolated settlements on the coast, and become a vital transport link for the timber industry and tourism. Surveying for the road, tentatively titled the South Coast Road, started in 1918 – with the road suggested to travel from Barwon Heads, follow the coast west around Cape Otway, and end near Warrnambool.In 1918, the Great Ocean Road Trust was formed as a private company, under the helm of president Howard Hitchcock. The company managed to secure £81,000 in capital from private subscription and borrowing, with Hitchcock himself contributing £3000.  would be repaid by charging drivers a toll until the debt was cleared, and the road would then be gifted to the state.

Construction on the road began on 19 September 1919, built by approximately 3,000 returned servicemen as a war memorial for fellow servicemen who had been killed in World War I. An advance survey team progressed through dense wilderness at approximately 3 kilometers a month. Construction was done by hand; using explosives, pick and shovel, wheel barrows, and some small machinery, and was at times perilous, with several workers killed on the job; the final sections along steep coastal mountains being the most difficult to work on. Anecdotal evidence from ABC archives in 1982 suggested workers would rest detonators on their knees during travel, as it was the softest ride for them. The soldiers were paid 10 shillings and sixpence for eight hours per day, also working a half-day on Saturdays. They used tents for accommodation throughout, and made use of a communal dining marquee and kitchen; food costing up to 10 shillings a week. Despite the difficulty involved in constructing the road, the workers had access to a piano, gramophone, games, newspapers and magazines at the camps. Additionally, in 1924, the steamboat Casino became stranded near Cape Patton after hitting a reef, forcing it to jettison 500 barrels of beer and 120 cases of spirits. The workers obtained the cargo, resulting in an unscheduled two-week-long drinking break. On 18 March 1922 the section from Eastern View to Lorne was officially opened with celebrations. However it was then closed from 10 May 1922 for further work; opening again on 21 December along with tolls to recoup construction costs. The charge, payable at Eastern View, was two shillings for motor cars, and 10 shillings for wagons with more than two horses. In November 1932, the section from Lorne to Apollo Bay was finished, bringing the road to completion. The road was officially opened with Victoria’s Lieutenant-Governor Sir William Irvine holding a ceremony near Lorne’s Grand Pacific Hotel,and the road subsequently being acknowledged as the world’s largest war memorial. At the time, newspaper The Age commented – “In the face of almost insurmountable odds, the Great Ocean Road has materialised from a dream or ‘wild-cat scheme’, as many dubbed it, into concrete reality”.Hitchcock had however died of heart disease on 22 August 1932, before the road was completed, though his car was driven behind the governor’s in the procession along the road during the opening ceremony. A memorial was constructed in Hitchcock’s name on the road at Mount Defiance, near Lorne, and he is still affectionately considered the Father of the Road. In its original state, the road was considered a formidable drive; fitting only a single vehicle comfortably at a time. Areas with sheer cliffs would be most hazardous, with only few places for drivers to pull over to allow others to proceed in the opposite direction.On 2 October 1936, the road was handed to the State Government; with the deed for the road presented to the Victorian Premier at a ceremony at the Cathedral Rock toll gate. It was at this time that the tolls were also removed. In 1962, the road was deemed by the Tourist Development Authority to be one of the world’s great scenic roads. It also had sections widened between the Lorne Hotel and the Pacific Hotel to improve traffic, while aiming to preserve its character.Despite improvements, the road was still considered a challenging drive; the Victorian Police motor school even using it for training around 1966. Over its life, the Great Ocean Road has been susceptible to natural elements; in 1960 theection at Princetown was partially washed away by water during storms.It experienced landslides on 11 August 1964, and in 1971; both closing sections of the road near Lorne. Because of the terrain surrounding the road, it was also closed due to bush-fires in 1962[ and 1964; particularly in areas with nearby camp-sites.In January 2011 a section of the overhanging cliffs collapsed due to heavy rain. In 2011, the road was added to the Australian National Heritage List.

HERE ARE SOME PHOTOS OF WHAT I SAW ALONG THE GREAT OCEAN ROAD

PANORAMA VIEW ALONG THE GREAT OCEAN ROAD

PANORAMA VIEW ALONG THE GREAT OCEAN ROAD

GREAT OCEAN ROAD VIEW

GREAT OCEAN ROAD VIEW

 VIEW ALONG THE GREAT OCEAN ROAD

VIEW ALONG THE GREAT OCEAN ROAD

VIEW FROM THE GREAT OCEAN ROAD

VIEW FROM THE GREAT OCEAN ROAD

VIEW FROM THE GREAT OCEAN ROAD

VIEW FROM THE GREAT OCEAN ROAD

——————

URQUHART BLUFF   -   THE GREAT OCEAN ROAD

URQUHART BLUFF – THE GREAT OCEAN ROAD

URQUHART BLUFF   -   THE GREAT OCEAN ROAD

URQUHART BLUFF – THE GREAT OCEAN ROAD

——

SPIT WATER LIGHTHOUSE

SPIT WATER LIGHTHOUSE

SPIT WATER LIGHTHOUSE

SPIT WATER LIGHTHOUSE

—–

LORNE, VICTORIA

Lorne is a seaside town on Louttit Bay in Victoria, Australia. It is situated about the Erskine River and is a popular destination on the Great Ocean Road tourist route. Lorne is in the Surf Coast Shire and at the 2006 Census in Australia had a population of 967, but this figure grows during the holiday season.

Prior to European settlement, Lorne was part of the traditional lands of the Gadubanud or King Parrot people of the Cape Otway coast according to Ian Clark,although many popular websites report that the area was occupied by the Kolakngat Aborigines.

Lorne is situated on a bay named after Captain Louttit, who sought shelter there in 1841 while supervising the retrieval of cargo from a nearby shipwreck. The coast was surveyed five years later in 1846. The first European settler was William Lindsay, a timber-cutter who began felling the area in 1849. The first telegraph arrived in 1859. Subdivision began in 1869 and in 1871 the town was named after the Marquess of Lorne from Argyleshire in  Scptland, on the occasion of his marriage to Princess Louise, one of Queen Victoria’s daughters. The Post Office opened on 29 April 1874.

By 1922 the Great Ocean Road was extended to Lorne, making the town much more accessible. The first passenger road service to Geelong was established in 1924 and guesthouses began to appear after 1930. The local fishing industry expanded significantly in the 1930s and 1940s. The Ash Wednesday bushfires swept through the area in 1983, destroying 76 houses.

TEDDY'S LOOKOUT AT LORNE, VICTORIA

TEDDY’S LOOKOUT AT LORNE, VICTORIA

GRAND PACIFIC HOTEL  LORNE, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA

GRAND PACIFIC HOTEL LORNE, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA

———————-

THE GREAT OTWAY NATIONAL PARK

The Great Otway National Park, also called The Otways, is a national park located in the Barwon South West region of Victoria, Australia. The 103,185-hectare (254,980-acre) national park is situated approximately 162 kilometres (101 mi) southwest of Melbourne. It contains a diverse range of landscapes and vegetation types and is situated within the Otway Ranges.

The park was declared in 2004 when Otway National Park, Angahook-Lorne State Park,
Carlisle State Park, Melba Gully State Park, areas of the Otway State Forest and a number of Crown Land reserves were combined into one park.
The parks were combined after a campaign by the local community and the Otway Ranges Environment Network and were officially gazetted on 11 December 2005.
The park is a popular area for interstate and international tourists, with companies operating tours in the region. It contains three camping areas at Johanna, Aire River and Blanket Bay. The park is accessed from the east via Apollo Bay, from the north via Forrest or Beech Forest, or from the west via Princetown.The park covers both coastline and hinterland in the Otway Ranges and so includes both beaches and forest, accessible via walking trails.The park and the Aire River campground are home to a significant koala population.The Cape Otway Lighthouse is adjacent to the park and is open to tourists throughout the week.Migrating whales and dolphins such as southern right and southern humpback, and bottlenose dolphins can be observed from the coasts.

CAPE Otway Lightstation is the oldest, surviving lighthouse in mainland Australia. The light, which has been in continuous operation since 1848, is perched on towering sea cliffs where Bass Strait and the Southern Ocean collide. For thousands of immigrants, after many months at sea, Cape Otway was their first sight of land after leaving Europe.

CAPE OTWAY LIGHTHOUSE

CAPE OTWAY LIGHTHOUSE

A VIEW FROM THE LIGHTHOUSE LOOKING TOWARD THE LIGHT STATION

A VIEW FROM THE LIGHTHOUSE LOOKING TOWARD THE LIGHT STATION

CAPE OTWAY LIGHTSTATION KEEPERS RESIDENCE

CAPE OTWAY LIGHTSTATION KEEPERS RESIDENCE

A VIEW OF THE COAST FROM THE CAPE OTWAY LIGHT STATION

A VIEW OF THE COAST FROM THE CAPE OTWAY LIGHT STATION

A VIEW OF THE COAST FROM THE CAPE OTWAY LIGHT STATION

A VIEW OF THE COAST FROM THE CAPE OTWAY LIGHT STATION

————————-

NEAR THE LIGHT STATION IS A PLAQUE TO FREDERICK VALENTICH  WHO DISAPPEARED IN 1978

FREDERICK VALENTICH

FREDERICK VALENTICH

Disappearance of Frederick Valentich

Twenty-year-old Frederick Valentich disappeared while on a 125-mile (235 km) training flight in a Cessna 182L light aircraft over Bass Strait in Australia on 21 October 1978.

Described as a “flying saucer enthusiast”, Valentich radioed Melbourne air traffic control that he was being accompanied by an aircraft about 1,000 feet (300 m) above him, that his engine had begun running roughly, and finally reported, “It’s not an aircraft.”[1]

There were belated reports of a UFO sighting in Australia on the night of the disappearance, however Associated Press reported that the Department of Transport was skeptical a UFO was behind Valentich’s disappearance, and that some of their officials speculated that “Valentich became disorientated and saw his own lights reflected in the water, or lights from a nearby island, while flying upside down.

Frederick Valentich had about 150 total hours flying time and held a class four instrument rating which authorised him to fly at night but only “in visual meteorological conditions”. He had twice applied to enlist in the Royal Australian Air Force but was rejected because of inadequate educational qualifications. He was a member of the Air Training Corps, determined to have a career in aviation. Valentich was studying part-time to become a commercial pilot but had a poor achievement record, having twice failed all five commercial license examination subjects, and as recently as the previous month had failed three more commercial license subjects. He had been involved in flying incidents, for example, straying into a controlled zone in Sydney, for which he received a warning, and twice deliberately flying into cloud, for which prosecution was being considered. According to his father, Guido, Frederick was an ardent believer in UFOs and worried about attacks from UFOs.

Valentich radioed Melbourne Flight Service at 7:06 PM to report an unidentified aircraft was following him at 4,500 feet and was told there was no known traffic at that level. Valentich said he could see a large unknown aircraft which appeared to be illuminated by four bright landing lights. He was unable to confirm its type, but said it had passed about 1,000 feet (300 m) overhead and was moving at high speed. Valentich then reported that the aircraft was approaching him from the east and said the other pilot might be purposely toying with him. Valentich said the aircraft was “orbiting” above him and that it had a shiny metal surface and a green light on it. Valentich reported that he was experiencing engine problems. Asked to identify the aircraft, Valentich radioed, “It isn’t an aircraft” when his transmission was interrupted by unidentified noise described as being “metallic, scraping sounds” before all contact was lost.

A sea and air search was undertaken that included oceangoing ship traffic, a P-3 Orion aircraft, plus eight civilian aircraft. The search encompassed over 1,000 square miles. Search efforts ceased on 25 October 1978.

A Department of Transport (DOT) investigation into Valentich’s disappearance was unable to determine the cause, but that it was “presumed fatal” for Valentich.Five years after Valentich’s plane went missing, an engine cowl flap was found washed ashore on Flinders Island. In July 1983 the Bureau of Air Safety Investigation asked The Royal Australian Navy Research Laboratory (RANRL) about the likelihood that the cowl flap might have “traveled” to its ultimate position from the region where the plane disappeared. The bureau noted that “the part has been identified as having come from a Cessna 182 aircraft between a certain range of serial numbers” which included Valentich’s aircraft. The bureau also noted that while it is possible for cowl flaps to separate from aircraft in flight, this had not happened with any recent aircraft.

VIDEO:

Frederick Valentich (Australian UFO case-1978)

—————————————

KOALAS CAN BE SEEN NEAR THE OTWAY LIGHTSTATION

KOALAS CAN BE SEEN  NEAR THE OTWAY LIGHTSTATION

KOALAS CAN BE SEEN NEAR THE OTWAY LIGHTSTATION

—————————————

CASTLE COVE

At Castle Cove, the Great Ocean Road reaches the coast for the first time since Mounts Bay. From the roadside car park 30 m above the beach, you can view the surf and the large rip that dominates the spot.

The two beaches face south-west and receive waves averaging over 1.5 m. These interact with the sand and reef to produce one massive rip straight out from below the car park and a second rip to the east, that runs out past the east beach. The main beach consists of 300 m of sand below the steep, vegetated bluffs, while the east beach is a narrow strip of sand backed by the bluffs and fronted by patchy rocks and reef.

CASTLE COVE

CASTLE COVE

CASTLE COVE

CASTLE COVE

CASTLE COVE

CASTLE COVE

———————————-

PORTARLINGTON, VICTORIA

Portarlington is a historic coastal township located on the Bellarine Peninsula, 28 km from the city of Geelong, in the state of Victoria, Australia. The gently rising hills behind the town feature vineyards and olive groves, overlooking Port Phillip Bay. Portarlington is a popular family holiday destination and a centre of fishing and aquaculture (mussels). At one time the town claimed the largest caravan park in the Southern Hemisphere, although the size has reduced considerably in recent decades. In the 2011 census, Portarlington (including Bellarine and the rural section of St Leonards) had a population of 3,580 people. Portarlington also has a large number of Maltese, Croatian, Italian and Islander immigrants.

The area around Portarlington was originally inhabited by the aboriginal Wathaurung people. Aboriginal shell middens can be found along the cliff-line at Portarlington. Mussels are the dominant shell species in evidence, demonstrating the importance of mussels to the area, even in pre-historic times. A ground-edged stone axe has been found at Portarlington. A stone artifact scatter also existed at a nearby site, but has been destroyed by development. Another stone artifact scatter has been identified at Point Richards, in the west of the town.

The Port Phillip area was first significantly explored by Europeans in January 1802, when Lieutenant John Murray spent three weeks investigating the Bay entrance. He does not appear to have landed at Portarlington. Ten weeks later, the English explorer, Matthew Flinders, camped at Indented Head, 6 km to the south-east of Portarlington, where he traded with aborigines while undertaking a survey of the Australian coastline. He subsequently landed several times briefly on the peninsula coast to take bearings, including at the location of Portarlington (where he shared lunch with aborigines), and also at Point Richards. In February 1803, the Surveyor-General Charles Grimes landed from his ship, the Cumberland, at Portarlington with an expedition and spent several days exploring the Bay coastline to Point Cook. They were impressed by the fine pasture and soil in the Bellarine Hills. They sailed back from Point Cook to Portarlington and landed again, where they were met by aboriginals. They traded food and utensils, however other provisions were stolen from their boat in their absence. Some evidence of smallpox among the locals was noted at that time.

Apart from the likely wanderings of the escaped English convict, William Buckley, who lived among the Wautharong people around the Bellarine Peninsula for 32 years after escaping into the bush in 1803, there was little European contact with the area until the arrival of the pioneer settler, John Batman, and his Port Phillip Association expedition in 1835. Batman established a base camp at Indented Head, and proceeded to survey the interior of the peninsula. Batman wrote glowing reports of the pasture and grazing potential of the Bellarine Hills (which he named “Wedge’s Range”), with a view of attracting interest in establishing sheep runs in the Port Phillip area. Further exploration was carried out by John Helder Wedge later in 1835, with Batman’s encouragement, and Wedge is believed to have again passed through the vicinity of Portarlington. He was also much impressed by the countryside, which he named “Ballarine”, but discovering the scarcity of fresh water, he directed his attentions elsewhere. When the first organised group of settlers arrived from Van Diemen’s Land aboard the Enterprize in August 1835, they sought out the well-watered northern reaches of Port Phillip, around the Yarra River. Wedge and the Batman party quickly abandoned Bellarine and Indented Head and followed them there.

When the holdings of the Port Phillip Association were allocated, the Bellarine Peninsula was allotted to the member, John Sinclair, who was the Superintendent of the Engineers’ Depot in Launceston. Sinclair was injured in February 1837, when he came to Port Phillip and attempted to visit his property. His two companions, Joseph Gellibrand and George Hesse, who continued the journey without him, disappeared, and no trace of them was ever found. Sinclair was evacuated back to Melbourne from Point Henry and made no further effort to take up his allotted land, although he remained in the Port Phillip District. By 1839 the Port Phillip Association had been bought out by the Derwent Company, which sold a number of runs on the Bellarine Peninsula and Indented Head to squatters, before folding in 1842.

Among the earliest known settlers in the vicinity of Portarlington was the former Hobart butcher, Henry Baynton, who was recorded there in the 1840s. Baynton established a cattle shipping service between Portarlington and Van Diemen’s Land. He is believed to have had a station named Westham, which may have occupied a site near the derelict homestead now known as Lincoln’s Farm, overlooking Point Richards. Baynton also had interests at Cowie’s Creek (now Corio), across the Bay. Baynton possibly sold out to John Brown, who is identified as the owner of a Point Richards station in 1847. Other squatters known to have had property around the Portarlington area in the 1840s include William Booth, James Conway Langdon, and William Harding. In 1848 new land regulations were introduced, and the squatters’ runs were subdivided into smaller allotments over the following years. By the early 1850s the era of the squatters had passed on the Bellarine Peninsula.

The township of Portarlington was formally surveyed around 1850 and was at that time named Drayton. It was renamed Portarlington in 1851, reportedly in honour of the English peer, Sir Henry Bennet, 1st Earl of Arlington, however it is also suggested, and perhaps seems more likely, owing to the number of early Irish settlers in the area, that the town was actually named after the town in Ireland bearing the same name, Portarlington, which was itself founded by Sir Henry Bennet in 1666. The newly surveyed township was neatly laid out, with broad streets, and planted with English elms and pines.

The first sale of town lots in Portarlington took place on 22 October 1851. It was described in the Geelong Advertiser newspaper as a “new township at Indented Head” and buyers were confident that it would quickly become “a place of importance”. The first buyers were mainly speculators, so although the lots initially sold well, few purchasers settled on their lots, and the town was slow to fill.

A steam-powered flour mill opened in 1857, and after a competing mill in nearby Drysdale was destroyed by fire in 1861 the development of Portarlington began to progress more rapidly. The mill owners built a private jetty and began receiving grain shipments from Geelong, and returning processed flour and bran. Around this time, the Bellarine Peninsula was regarded as the granary of the Victorian colony. A Post Office opened on 1 March 1863 (incidentally, known as Port Arlington until about 1866 but this may have been in error).

By 1865, the population of Portarlington had passed 200, and the town boasted two hotels and a blacksmith’s shop. The Wesleyan congregation, who were the most numerous, built the town’s first church in 1866. Before this they had conducted their services at the mill.

The Portarlington Pier was constructed in 1859, after a petition from local farmers demanding access to a public jetty, and it quickly became an important port of call for the network of steamers plying the Bay, both for goods and passengers. The first vessel servicing the direct run to Hobsons Bay, the Petrel, was reportedly doing a brisk trade by 1866, delivering hay, butter, eggs, cheese, potatoes, wheat, flour, geese, turkeys, poultry, bacon, pork, and pigs, and returning with supplies of tea, sugar, coffee, wine, beer, spirits, and other commercial items. The jetty was extended in 1870, allowing sufficient depth for shallow draft vessels to dock at any tide, and soon daily steamers from Melbourne were calling. The first to pick up passengers and cargo was the Despatch, in 1872. The direct run to Melbourne provided markets for large deliveries of potatoes and onions from around Portarlington, and lines of carts laden with produce were a common sight heading down to the port. At times up to eight or nine lighters would be loading at the jetty with cargo for Melbourne, as well as a steamer. The jetty was reconstructed in 1872, and storage sheds added.

Portarlington’s picturesque setting and fine sandy beaches attracted visitors from Geelong and Melbourne, and the regular steamer service secured the town’s progress as a popular seaside resort. A public bathing house existed from as early as 1868, and a replacement was built in 1877. Bathing on the open beaches was prohibited in early days “out of respect for public sentiment”.

A brickworks was established in 1870, producing bricks, tiles, and pipes, from the high grade Portarlington clay, for local use, and was soon exporting to Geelong and Melbourne. When the flour mill closed down in 1874, the brickworks moved into the building. The brickworks seems to have ceased production during the depression in the 1890s.

There were 343 inhabitants in Portarlington in 1871.

The first State School in Portarlington (No. 1251) opened in the Wesleyan Church building in 1873, with 73 pupils. It was soon relocated to the Temperance Hall (built in 1874), after a dispute with church authorities. The new permanent red-brick school building, located on the current site, was formally opened on 27 Apr 1882, as State School No. 2455. It featured a bell-tower, a central fireplace, and two large rain-water tanks. A free public library opened in the ante-room of the Temperance Hall in 1883. A new and well-furnished building, purpose built for the library, was opened in 1884. A Market Reserve was established near the jetty in 1877.

The Anglican Church was built in Portarlington in 1883, and a Presbyterian Sunday school was constructed in 1888. The Catholic Church was completed in 1895, although it is believed that a Catholic school had been running in the town since the 1860s, and Mass may have previously been celebrated in a rented hall.

Horse racing began at Portarlington in 1859 on a track near the mill, but didn’t generate much interest until the 1880s, when a new track was established to the west of the town. The new track was fenced-off in 1881, despite opposition from local graziers, and the Portarlington Turf Club was established in 1883, with an annual meeting held on Easter Monday. The track was close to the beach, and was knee-deep in sand in places. It was regarded as the heaviest track in the country.

The Portarlington Cricket Club was established in 1872, although the game had been played in the town for many years before. An Australian Rules Football club appeared in 1874. Tennis courts were built in the old park in 1896.

A permanent police station opened in Portarlington in 1875, although a trooper had been stationed in the town since 1871. The new station had no lock-up, so any prisoners had to be taken to Drysdale.

In 1887, a corner of the Market Reserve was allocated as the site for the new brick Post Office. Portarlington had enjoyed a postal service since the 1860s, however public agitation for a more centrally located facility had increased throughout the 1880s. A telegraph service began in 1882. A branch bank was also operating in the town by the 1880s. In 1882, Portarlington was described as an exceptionally clean town, with a variety of stores and traders, and a daily coach service ran to Geelong, via Drysdale. A rail service was also accessible from Drysdale. Five fishermen were operating out of the town at that time.

By the 1920s, the increasing popularity of the automobile generated a new influx of holiday makers from Melbourne and regional Victoria. A number of camping grounds and caravan parks were established throughout the town, and in summer months the town’s permanent residents were outnumbered many times over by holidaying families and tourists. Some families have been returning to Portarlington year after year, over multiple generations, some eventually buying holiday homes in the area, and they have become important contributors to the social and economic life of the town.

In more recent years the Seachange phenomenon has also made a notable impact on the town, with greater numbers of people buying property by the sea for lifestyle reasons or to enjoy their retirement. This has had a dramatic effect on property prices and has also lead to calls for improvements in services and infrastructure in the area.

Portarlington Pier

The Pier, a working harbour, houses the town’s mussel fleet, so it’s not unusual to see crews setting out for or returning from harvesting Blue Mussels grown in farms just offshore in Port Phillip Bay.

Portarlington has become famous for its mussels, and can be bought direct from the farmer in town, often on the pier straight from the boat.

PORTARLINGTON PIER

PORTARLINGTON PIER

PORTARLINGTON PIER

PORTARLINGTON PIER

PORTARLINGTON PIER

PORTARLINGTON PIER

PORTARLINGTON PIER

PORTARLINGTON PIER

PORTARLINGTON PIER

PORTARLINGTON PIER

PORTARLINGTON PIER RENOVATION

Since early February 2015 work to build a new 175 meter section of pier alongside the existing pier has progressed

In the first four weeks of the project a large piling rig was used to drive 60 piles into the sea bed.

Then works moved to sleeving the steel piles with a protective polymer sleeve and beginning work to install the cross heads which span the width of the pier.

In late Feb and early March the focus of work has been continuing to install the cross heads and beginning the installation of the 14 concrete deck slabs which connect each pair of piles and will eventually create the surface of the new pier.

Much of the concrete pre-fabrication work for the pier was finished before on site works began. As the weather has been relatively kind to the project works have progressed well. The project is currently tracking ahead of the planned mid-year completion.

PORTARLINGTON PIER  - LARGE PILING RIG USED IN RNOVATION OF THE PIER

PORTARLINGTON PIER – LARGE PILING RIG USED IN RENOVATION OF THE PIER

PORTARLINGTON PIER  - LARGE PILING RIG USED IN RNOVATION OF THE PIER

PORTARLINGTON PIER – LARGE PILING RIG USED IN RENOVATION OF THE PIER

————————-

THE TWELVE APOSTLES

The Twelve Apostles is a collection of limestone stacks off the shore of the Port Campbell National Park, by the Great Ocean Road in Victoria, Australia. Their proximity to one another has made the site a popular tourist attraction. Currently there are eight apostles left but the name remains significant and spectacular especially in the Australian tourism industry.

The apostles were formed by erosion: the harsh and extreme weather conditions from the Southern Ocean gradually eroded the soft limestone to form caves in the cliffs, which then became arches, which in turn collapsed; leaving rock stacks up to 45 metres high. Now because of this erosion there are fewer than ten remaining. The site was known as the Sow and Piglets until 1922 (Muttonbird Island, near Loch Ard Gorge, was the Sow, and the smaller rock stacks were the Piglets); after which it was renamed to The Apostles for tourism purposes. The formation eventually became known as the Twelve Apostles, despite only ever having nine stacks.

In 2002, the Port Campbell Professional Fishermens Association unsuccessfully attempted to block the creation of a proposed marine national park at the Twelve Apostles location,but were satisfied with the later Victorian Government decision not to allow seismic exploration at the same site by Benaris Energy;believing it would harm marine life.

The stacks are susceptible to further erosion from the waves. On 3 July 2005, a 50-metre-tall stack collapsed, leaving eight remaining (compare the two pictures from 2002 and 2012). On 25 September 2009, it was thought that another of the stacks had fallen, but this was actually one of the smaller stacks of the Three Sisters formation.The rate of erosion at the base of the limestone pillars is approximately 2 cm per year.Due to wave action eroding the cliff face existing headlands are expected to become new limestone stacks in the future.

THE TWELVE APOSTLES  PLAQUE

THE TWELVE APOSTLES PLAQUE

THE TWELVE APOSTLES LOOKING WEST FROM THE VIEWING PLATFORM

THE TWELVE APOSTLES LOOKING WEST FROM THE VIEWING PLATFORM

THE TWELVE APOSTLES MAIN VIEWING AREA

THE TWELVE APOSTLES MAIN VIEWING AREA

THE TWELVE APOSTLES LOOKING EAST FROM TE MAIN VIEWING PLATFORM

THE TWELVE APOSTLES LOOKING EAST FROM TE MAIN VIEWING PLATFORM

THE TWELVE APOSTLES  - THE ARCH       -     This natural rock formation formed through erosion, at its best during rough seas when the waves crash in and around the arch.

THE TWELVE APOSTLES – THE ARCH – This natural rock formation formed through erosion, at its best during rough seas when the waves crash in and around the arch.

LONDON BRIDGE HAS FALLEN DOWN  -  London Arch (formerly London Bridge) is an offshore natural arch formation This stack was formed by a gradual process of erosion, and until 1990 formed a complete double-span natural bridge. The span closer to the shoreline collapsed unexpectedly on 15 January 1990, leaving two tourists stranded on the outer span before being rescued by helicopter. No one was injured in the event. Prior to the collapse, the arch was known as London Bridge because of its similarity to its namesake.

LONDON BRIDGE HAS FALLEN DOWN – London Arch (formerly London Bridge) is an offshore natural arch formation
This stack was formed by a gradual process of erosion, and until 1990 formed a complete double-span natural bridge.
The span closer to the shoreline collapsed unexpectedly on 15 January 1990, leaving two tourists stranded on the outer span before being rescued by helicopter. No one was injured in the event. Prior to the collapse, the arch was known as London Bridge because of its similarity to its namesake.

—————————-

THE GROTTO

As you step down to this geological formation created when sinkholes in the limestone cliffs met with a receding cliff line. You can feel the eeriness of the still, clear water of the Grotto in contrast to the ocean.

THE GROTTO (PLAQUE)

THE GROTTO (PLAQUE)

THE GROTTO

THE GROTTO

Advertisements
No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: