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MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA – A SHORT VISIT – AUGUST 7 -10 2014 (PHOTOS AND POEMS)

August 13, 2014

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA  –  A SHORT VISIT  –  AUGUST 7 – 10  2014

Melbourne is the capital of Victoria, Australia, and home to close to 4 million people. Many of the citizens of Melbourne live in the suburbs that are east and south of the Yarra River, sprawled around Port Phillip Bay and extending as far east as Mount Dandenong.

History

Melbourne is the youngest of all of the ‘world cities’. Melbourne grew from a tiny speculative pastoral outpost in the 1850s into a world city within a mere 30 years, reaching around 1 million people by the turn of the century. Much of this phenomenal growth was due to the gold rush – one of the biggest in the world’s history, which saw a huge influx of migrants bring instant wealth and prosperity to the city. In the 1880’s Melbourne was given the title ‘Marvelous Melbourne’, and boasted a city that rivaled the great cities of Europe and North America. The city hosted the 1880 World’s Fair, in the Royal Exhibition Building, which hosted the first parliament and still stands in the magnificent Carlton Gardens. The city was, until Canberra was built in the late 1920s, from 1901 the federal capital of Australia. Although Sydney eventually grew larger, Melbourne still remains the financial, sporting and cultural capital of the nation.

Architecture

Courtesy of the gold rush and the 1880s land boom, much of inner Melbourne has a distinctly Victorian architectural character. The stock of boom time buildings was further enhanced in the 1920s and 1930s, by many elegant prewar buildings. Much of early Melbourne character has been destroyed post the 1956 Olympic games by a wave of modernism and Internationalism urban renewal that gives parts of downtown Melbourne a feel similar to that of downtown Chicago or New York. More recently, the architectural fabric of the city has been somewhat sympathetically restored through the postmodern architecture movement of the 1990s. Just a sample of Melbourne’s collection of great buildings can be found within this site.

Culture

The city is one of the world’s most multicultural cities. For example, Melbourne has the world’s third largest Greek population – and the largest outside of Greece. Only Athens and Thessalonaki boast larger Greek populations. The culture contributes to the city’s reputation as Australia’s culinary capital, with many fine restaurants representing cuisines from around the world.

Melbourne is the undisputed sporting capital of Australia, hosting international events such as the 1956 Olympics, the Australian Formula 1 Grand Prix, Australian Open Tennis, 2006 Commonwealth Games and Australian Rules Football grand final. The Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG or the ‘G’ as it is affectionately known here) is a world famous venue for both cricket and football.
Melbourne is Australia’s comedy capital, and hosts the world’s second biggest comedy festival outside of Edinburgh.
The city is Australias’s home of the Arts, with internationally renowned Arts precinct and film festival.

Transport

The city is home to the world’s second largest tram and light rail network. The tram network is the only remaining network in an Australian capital city, and is being constantly extended to serve the outer suburbs. The city is famous for it’s ‘green rattlers’ or W class trams from the 1950s, although they are now accompanied by more modern counterparts. Flinders Street, one of the world’s busiest railway stations and longest platforms creates a constant flow of pedestrian traffic in the heart of the city. ‘Under the Clocks’ is a favorite Melbourne meeting place.

Inner Melbourne

Inner Melbourne is a highly urban city that features strip shopping, terrace housing and high rise apartments. By contrast, outer Melbourne is one of the world’s largest suburban sprawls and home to over 80% of the city’s population. Many of the older suburbs still feature their original cobbled bluestone streets. Bluestone being one of the favored building materials in Melbourne until the turn of the century.

Melbourne is renowned for it’s beautiful 19th century parks, that include fine examples of Victorian landscaping. Among them are the Fitzroy, Carlton and Royal Botanic Gardens, recognised as among the world’s finest, as well as Albert Park – home to tha Australian Formula 1 Grand Prix. This green belt ensures that the pollution levels remain relatively low for a city of Melbourne’s size.
Grand 19th century boulevardes, including Royal Parade, Victoria Parade, St Kilda Road and Dandenong Road act as gateways into the city.

The CBD

The Melbourne Central Business district is laid out in a uniform grid pattern, unique to an Australian city. The Melbourne CBD grid is large in comparison to other Australian cities, but not as dense in high rise construction as others. Recent extensions to the CBD in Southbank and Docklands is seeing this central area nearly double in size. The streets are distinctly wide compared to the other Australian capitals and accomodate a central tram line down most streets as well as 2 directional street traffic and parking. This creates an airy and open feel to the city, and makes it very accessible, accomodating a large volume of pedestrian traffic. Many of the city streets are lined with grand old deciduous plane trees, giving the city a European character.

The Skyline

The CBD skyline is broken up into 2 distinct skylines, the eastern and western. Both have significant clusters of tall modern buildings, dominated by 5 of the 10 tallest towers in the country, each on average 50 storys in height, many with spires, and the largest in the southern hemisphere – the sleek glassy Rialto Towers. In between is the a height limited retailing district. St Kilda road is a massive tree lined avenue, with it’s very own skyline composed of hundreds of medium height limited towers. Significant new skylines are emerging outside of the CBD at Southbank and the new Docklands precinct.

 

HERE ARE SOME PHOTOS  OF THE CBD

MEDIA HOUSE SPENCER STREET, MELBOURNE

MEDIA HOUSE SPENCER STREET, MELBOURNE

 

 

RAILWAY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, MELBOURNE

RAILWAY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, MELBOURNE

 

 

SOUTHER CROSS STATION  -  COACH TERMINAL

SOUTHER CROSS STATION – COACH TERMINAL

 

 

SOUTHERN CROSS RAILWAY STATION  -  MELBOURNE

SOUTHERN CROSS RAILWAY STATION – MELBOURNE

 

 

MELBOURNE TRAM IN FRONT OF SOUTHERN CROSS STATION

MELBOURNE TRAM IN FRONT OF SOUTHERN CROSS STATION

 

 

 

HELLENIC MUSEUM MELBOURNE

HELLENIC MUSEUM MELBOURNE

 

 

 

SUPREME COURT MELBOURNE

SUPREME COURT MELBOURNE

 

 

Station Pier Melbourne's Cruise Ship Terminal Station Pier was originally known as Railway Pier and was first opened in 1854. It played a key role in Victoria's history and through the mid to late 1800's saw the arrival of the first visitors keen to seek their fortunes on the goldfields and then the settlers. It saw off the first contingent of Australian troops headed for the Boer War. In October 1914 16 ships left Station Pier for World War I. Again in 1940 troops headed for the European, African and Pacific theatres of World War II from Station Pier. Post the Second World War many thousands of the migrants that came to Australia's shores and gave Melbourne its rich multicultural diversity first set foot on Australian soil at Station Pier. The pier and its unique Gate House are heritage listed. Today Station Pier is Melbourne's premier cruise ship terminal and is also host to the Spirit of Tasmania ferry service from Melbourne to Devonport. It also plays host to visiting naval and tall ships. Unlike many cruise ship terminals, Station Pier is not located within a freight terminal. The pier is constructed directly off the beach into Port Phillip Bay at the historic and cosmopolitan suburb of Port Melbourne, giving visitors stunning views from their ship and the chance to wander along the beach side board walks directly from the end of the pier.

Station Pier
Melbourne’s Cruise Ship Terminal
Station Pier was originally known as Railway Pier and was first opened in 1854. It played a key role in Victoria’s history and through the mid to late 1800’s saw the arrival of the first visitors keen to seek their fortunes on the goldfields and then the settlers. It saw off the first contingent of Australian troops headed for the Boer War. In October 1914 16 ships left Station Pier for World War I. Again in 1940 troops headed for the European, African and Pacific theatres of World War II from Station Pier. Post the Second World War many thousands of the migrants that came to Australia’s shores and gave Melbourne its rich multicultural diversity first set foot on Australian soil at Station Pier. The pier and its unique Gate House are heritage listed.
Today Station Pier is Melbourne’s premier cruise ship terminal and is also host to the Spirit of Tasmania ferry service from Melbourne to Devonport. It also plays host to visiting naval and tall ships. Unlike many cruise ship terminals, Station Pier is not located within a freight terminal. The pier is constructed directly off the beach into Port Phillip Bay at the historic and cosmopolitan suburb of Port Melbourne, giving visitors stunning views from their ship and the chance to wander along the beach side board walks directly from the end of the pier.

 

 

PORT MELBOURNE TRAM STOP

PORT MELBOURNE TRAM STOP

 

 

 

CAFE AT PORT MELBOURNE TRAM STOP

CAFE AT PORT MELBOURNE TRAM STOP

 

 

LUNA PARK  -  Melbourne's Luna Park is a historic amusement park located on the foreshore of Port Phillip Bay in St Kilda, Melbourne, Victoria. It opened on 13 December 1912 and has been operating almost continuously ever since.

LUNA PARK – Melbourne’s Luna Park is a historic amusement park located on the foreshore of Port Phillip Bay in St Kilda, Melbourne, Victoria. It opened on 13 December 1912 and has been operating almost continuously ever since.

 

 

LUNA PARK SIGN

LUNA PARK SIGN

 

 

ST. KILDA PIER  -   St Kilda Pier IS a Melbourne landmark and a popular place to stroll and fish since the 1950s.  Featuring the historic St Kilda Pier Kiosk, first built in 1904 and rebuilt after it was destroyed by fire in 2003, and with barbeques, picnic areas and playground nearby, day and night St Kilda Pier symbolises the seaside fun, relaxation and romance of St Kilda.

ST. KILDA PIER – St Kilda Pier is a Melbourne landmark and a popular place to stroll and fish since the 1950s. Featuring the historic St Kilda Pier Kiosk, first built in 1904 and rebuilt after it was destroyed by fire in 2003, and with barbeques, picnic areas and playground nearby, day and night St Kilda Pier symbolises the seaside fun, relaxation and romance of St Kilda.

 

 

ST. KILDA PIER

ST. KILDA PIER

 

 

ST. KILDA PIER KIOSK

ST. KILDA PIER KIOSK

 

 

 

ST. KILDA PIER KIOSK SIGN

ST. KILDA PIER KIOSK SIGN

 

 

 

ST. KILDA PIER SWANS

ST. KILDA PIER SWANS

 

 

 

ST. KILDA BREAKWATER

ST. KILDA BREAKWATER

 

 

PANORAMIC VIEW OF PORT PHILIP AND MELBOURNE CITY

PANORAMIC VIEW OF PORT PHILIP AND MELBOURNE CITY

 

 

 ROYAL MELBOURNE YACHT SQUADRON     The Royal Melbourne Yacht Squadron, with a history of over 140 years, is one of the oldest yacht clubs in Victoria with a long list of historical firsts; and now with Melbourne's newest marina. Situated at St Kilda in close proximity to the Melbourne CBD, it is regarded as the center of aquatic events in Victoria.

ROYAL MELBOURNE YACHT SQUADRON
The Royal Melbourne Yacht Squadron, with a history of over 140 years, is one of the oldest yacht clubs in Victoria with a long list of historical firsts; and now with Melbourne’s newest marina. Situated at St Kilda in close proximity to the Melbourne CBD, it is regarded as the center of aquatic events in Victoria.

 

 

 ST. KILDA CENOTAPH  -  Tall cenotaph with plaques commemorates those from St Kilda who served and who died in World War One and Two


ST. KILDA CENOTAPH – Tall cenotaph with plaques commemorates those from St Kilda who served and who died in World War One and Two

 

SKATEBOARDERS AT ST. KILDA:

ST. KILDA SKATEBORADERS

ST. KILDA SKATE BOARDERS

 

 

ST. KILDA SKATE BOARDERS

ST. KILDA SKATE BOARDERS

 

 

ST. KILDA SKATE BOARDERS

ST. KILDA SKATE BOARDERS

————————————-

 

 

MELBOURNE POEMS

 
MELBOURNE
PATRICK MOLONEY

O sweet Queen-city of the golden South,
   Piercing the evening with thy star-lit spires,
Thou wert a witness when I kissed the mouth
   Of her whose eyes outblazed the skyey fires.
I saw the parallels of thy long streets,
   With lamps like angels shining all a-row,
While overhead the empyrean seats
   Of gods were steeped in paradisic glow.
The Pleiades with rarer fires were tipt,
   Hesper sat throned upon his jewelled chair,
The belted giant’s triple stars were dipt
   In all the splendour of Olympian air,
On high to bless, the Southern Cross did shine,
Like that which blazed o’er conquering Constantine.

 

————————-

Melbourne

PETE DOWE

I am Melbourne.
I yearn for you Melbourne.
You’re alive,
you allow me to breathe.
I open my mouth
your mouth,
to praise you
to drink you in.
In Melbourne
I open envelopes,
I go to the opening of envelopes
rugged up in my woollies.
Winter, Summer, Autumn, Spring
four seasons in one day,
you’re quick with joke, or light up my smoke*
watering, but never dampening my spirits.
You cry
and I cry
not knowing why,
it is enough just to know you.
We had our unfashionable years
when I did the drawback
for something to say
and people shunned you bragging.
We were never cool
but now both of us are trendy;
berets and outside cafes
laughing at our newfound fame, but with confidence.
You amazingly nurture conflicting passions:
physical, emotional, spiritual.
You’re the world’s most liveable city,
and Melbourne,
there’s no place like home.

—————

Melbourne

SARAH ELIZABETH CLARK

Melbourne
My city of rain
Take away coffee
Fast paced strangers
Dark and wet
Architectural
Like 1000 cities
But different
This one is home
Mine

 

 

 

 

 

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