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DEEP SOUTH USA – A ROAD TRIP – NASHVILLE TO BIRMINGHAM – OCTOBER 1-12 2013

December 20, 2013

IN OCTOBER 2013  LEONARD EPSTEIN AND JANELLE BURGESS DID A ROAD TRIP THROUGH THE DEEP SOUTH. STARTING OUT OF ATLANTA, WE STOPPED IN NASHVILLE, MEMPHIS, GRACELAND, TUPELO, CLARKSDALE, VICKSBURG, LAFAYETTE, NEW ORLEANS AND BIRMINGHAM

OUR GOAL WAS TO TRACE THE ROOTS OF AMERICAN MUSIC ALONG THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER AND EXPERIENCE THE CULTURAL LANDSCAPE  THAT GAVE BIRTH TO  THE BLUES, COUNTRY AND ROCK AND ROLL.

AFTER MEETING OUR TRAVEL GROUP AT A  AIRPORT HOTEL IN ATLANTA WE STARTED OUR JOURNEY, AND

OUR FIRST STOP WAS LYNCHBURG THE HOME OF THE JACK DANIELS DISTILLERY.

Lynchburg is a city in the south-central region of Tennesse, located in Moore county.Lynchburg is best known for the Jach Daniel’s distillery. It is a small city of 5700 people and one one traffic light.

Miss Mary Bobo's Boarding House & Restaurant City: Lynchburg, TN Region: Middle Tennessee Subregion: Nashville & Surrounding Areas Off the village square in Lynchburg rests Miss Mary Bobo’s Boarding House. Since 1908, this historic home has served traditional foods with hospitality. Reservations required. Since 1908, Miss Mary Bobo's Boarding House has been a place for true Southern hospitality and traditional home cooking. Steep yourself in the history and lore of the boarding house traditions.

Miss Mary Bobo’s Boarding House & Restaurant –  Lynchburg
Off the village square in Lynchburg rests Miss Mary Bobo’s Boarding House. Since 1908, this historic home has served traditional foods with hospitality.
Since 1908, Miss Mary Bobo’s Boarding House has been a place for true Southern hospitality and traditional home cooking.

Miss Mary Bobo's Boarding House

Miss Mary Bobo’s Boarding House Parlor

Miss Mary Bobo's Boarding House Entrance

Miss Mary Bobo’s Boarding House Entrance

Miss Mary Bobo's Boarding House Dining Room

Miss Mary Bobo’s Boarding House Dining Room

Moore County Jail, Lynchburg, Tennesse

Moore County Jail, Lynchburg, Tennesse

Lynchburg Historic District Street

Lynchburg Historic District Street

Lynchburg Courthouse

Lynchburg Courthouse

Lynchburg Shops

Lynchburg Shops

Farmers Bank, Lynchburg, tennesse

Farmers Bank, Lynchburg, Tennesse

Cowboy Jack's Shop selling Jack Daniels souvenirs

Cowboy Jack’s Shop selling Jack Daniels souvenirs

Sully's Souvenir Shop

Sully’s Souvenir Shop

JACK DANIEL’S DISTILLERY

Jack Daniel’s is a brand of sour mash, Tennesse whiskey that is the highest selling American whiskey in the world. It is produced in Lynchburg, Tennesse, by the Jack Daniel Distillery.Despite being the location of a major operational distillery, Jack Daniel’s home county of  Mooreis a dry county, so the product is not available for consumption at stores or restaurants within the county.

Although the product generally meets the regulatory criteria for classification as a straight bourbon, the company disavows this classification and markets it simply as Tennessee whiskey rather than as Tennessee bourbon.Packaged in distinctive square bottles, a total of 11 million cases of the flagship “Black Label” product were sold in the company’s fiscal year

ENTRANCE TO THE JACK DANIEL'S DISTILLERY VISITOR'S CENTER

ENTRANCE TO THE JACK DANIEL’S DISTILLERY VISITOR’S CENTER

JACK DANIELS STATUE

JACK DANIELS STATUE

JACK DANIEL'S VISITOR CENTER

JACK DANIEL’S VISITOR CENTER

JACK DANIEL'S MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

JACK DANIEL’S MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

JACK DANIEL'S OFFICE

JACK DANIEL’S OFFICE

PHOTO OF JACK DANIELS (TOP LEFT) WITH HAT SURROUNDED BY HIS WORKERS

PHOTO OF JACK DANIELS (TOP LEFT) WITH HAT SURROUNDED BY HIS WORKERS

BRONZE STATUE OF JACK DANIELS

BRONZE STATUE OF JACK DANIELS

NASHVILLE, TENNESSE In 1796 Tennessee became the 16th state of the of the Union. The name of Tennessee comes from the Cherokee name Tanasai, which was a Village in the area.

With the first arrivals of non-Indian settlers, such as Timothy Demontbruen, James Robertson and the Donelson Party, in the early 1790’s, Tennessee quickly severed it ties as being known as the western part of North Carolina, and later The State of Franklin, and applied for admission into the Union.

Within the next century, Tennessee found itself transformed from a trading post, frequented by Mountain Men exploring the fur trades from the Mississippi river to the Upper Illinois territories; to a thriving Educational and Commerce center.

In the 1840’s educator Philip Lindsay thought that Nashville should encourage the ideals of Classical Greek education, such as Philosophy and Latin and be known as the Athens of the West. While that nick -name never took hold, decades later Nashville would be given a similar nick-name; Athens of the South, that would became synonymous with Nashville until the title of Music City arrived, with the dawn of the Grand Ole Opry in the 1930’s.

If you look in the yellow pages of Nashville, you will still find many companies with the name of Athens within their title

TENNESSE STATE CAPITOL

Tennessee State Capitol

Finished in 1859, the historic Tennessee State Capitol is one of the oldest working capitols in the country and designated as a civil engineering landmark for its innovative construction. The distinctive tower is designed after the monument of Lysicrates in Athens, Greece. The architect, William Strickland, died in 1854 and is entombed above the cornerstone. The exterior and interior walls are massive blocks of limestone. Numerous ghost stories are associated with the architect and Samuel Dold Morgan, chairman of the building committee, with whom he frequently argued.

During the Union occupation of Nashville (1862-65), the Capitol was tranformed into Fortress Andrew Johnson. The artillery located there never had to be fired in battle, but were used for drills and celebrations.

The Capitol, still in use by state government, features numerous works of art, historical murals and frescos, portraits, massive chandeliers, the House and Senate chambers and library, and the Governor’s Office.

The grounds include the tomb of President and Mrs. James K. Polk, the famous equestrian statue of President Andrew “Old Hickory” Jackson, hero of the Battle of New Orleans, and statues of President Andrew Johnson and Sam Davis, “Boy Hero of the Confederacy,” World War I hero Sgt. Alvin York, and Senator Edward W. Carmack.

TENNESSE STATE CAPITOL

TENNESSE STATE CAPITOL

TENNESSE STATE CAPITOL WITH A STATUE OF ANDREW JACKSON

TENNESSE STATE CAPITOL WITH A STATUE OF ANDREW JACKSON

TENNESSE STATE CAPITOL SUPREME COURT CHAMBER

TENNESSE STATE CAPITOL SUPREME COURT CHAMBER

TENNESSE STATE CAPITOL  ENTRANCE

TENNESSE STATE CAPITOL ENTRANCE

TENNESSE STATE CAPITOL INTERIOR

TENNESSE STATE CAPITOL INTERIOR

TENNESSE STATE CAPITOL OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR

TENNESSE STATE CAPITOL OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR

TENNESSE STATE CAPITOL BUST OF JOHN SEVIER - JOHN SEVIER George Washington is sometimes known as the “Father of our Country.” Perhaps John Sevier is the “Father of Tennessee.” Born in Virginia in 1745, Sevier migrated to what is now Washington County, Tennessee, with his wife and nine children at the age of 26. Sevier developed a reputation as a leader in combat against Native Americans, which was true of many of Tennessee’s early settlers. He also became a hero after he led an army of settlers at the Battle of Kings Mountain, which the rebellious colonists won. Before Tennessee became a state, Sevier was the governor of what is now referred to as the "Lost State of Franklin." You see, in 1784 the people living in what is now northeastern Tennessee voted to form a state called Franklin. For four years they acted as if the state existed, but the state of North Carolina was opposed to the idea of an independent state of Franklin. Because of this, Congress never approved the state of Franklin, and it faded from existence. Sevier was elected Tennessee's first governor and would eventually serve in that position for twelve years (1796-1801 and 1803-1809). Sevier also served four terms as a Congressman. However, John Sevier did have his enemies. One of them was Andrew Jackson. In fact the two men disliked each other so much that they nearly dueled in 1803.

TENNESSE STATE CAPITOL
BUST OF JOHN SEVIER –
JOHN SEVIER
George Washington is sometimes known as the “Father of our Country.”
Perhaps John Sevier is the “Father of Tennessee.”
Born in Virginia in 1745, Sevier migrated to what is now Washington County, Tennessee, with his wife and nine children at the age of 26. Sevier developed a reputation as a leader in combat against Native Americans, which was true of many of Tennessee’s early settlers. He also became a hero after he led an army of settlers at the Battle of Kings Mountain, which the rebellious colonists won.
Before Tennessee became a state, Sevier was the governor of what is now referred to as the “Lost State of Franklin.”
You see, in 1784 the people living in what is now northeastern Tennessee voted to form a state called Franklin. For four years they acted as if the state existed, but the state of North Carolina was opposed to the idea of an independent state of Franklin. Because of this, Congress never approved the state of Franklin, and it faded from existence.
Sevier was elected Tennessee’s first governor and would eventually serve in that position for twelve years (1796-1801 and 1803-1809). Sevier also served four terms as a Congressman.
However, John Sevier did have his enemies. One of them was Andrew Jackson. In fact the two men disliked each other so much that they nearly dueled in 1803.

TENNESSE STATE CAPITOL BUST OF ANDREW JACKSON =        0   Born in poverty, Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) had become a wealthy Tennessee lawyer and rising young politician by 1812, when war broke out between the United States and Britain. His leadership in that conflict earned Jackson national fame as a military hero, and he would become America's most influential–and polarizing–political figure during the 1820s and 1830s. After narrowly losing to John Quincy Adams in the contentious 1824 presidential election, Jackson returned four years later to win redemption, soundly defeating Adams and becoming the nation's seventh president (1829-1837). As America's political party system developed, Jackson became the leader of the new Democratic Party. A supporter of states' rights and slavery's extension into the new western territories, he opposed the Whig Party and Congress on polarizing issues such as the Bank of the United States. For some, his legacy is tarnished by his role in the forced relocation of Native American tribes living east of the Mississippi.

TENNESSE STATE CAPITOL
BUST OF ANDREW JACKSON  –   Born in poverty, Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) had become a wealthy Tennessee lawyer and rising young politician by 1812, when war broke out between the United States and Britain. His leadership in that conflict earned Jackson national fame as a military hero, and he would become America’s most influential–and polarizing–political figure during the 1820s and 1830s. After narrowly losing to John Quincy Adams in the contentious 1824 presidential election, Jackson returned four years later to win redemption, soundly defeating Adams and becoming the nation’s seventh president (1829-1837). As America’s political party system developed, Jackson became the leader of the new Democratic Party. A supporter of states’ rights and slavery’s extension into the new western territories, he opposed the Whig Party and Congress on polarizing issues such as the Bank of the United States. For some, his legacy is tarnished by his role in the forced relocation of Native American tribes living east of the Mississippi. 

TENNESSE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

TENNESSE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

PHOTOS OF THE MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

PHOTOS OF THE MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OUTSIDE THE CHAMBER

TENNESSE STATE CAPITOL HALLWAY

TENNESSE STATE CAPITOL HALLWAY

TENNESSE STATE CAPITOL PLAQUE

TENNESSE STATE CAPITOL PLAQUE

POLICE MEMORIAL, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE - This memorial is dedicated to the officers who gave their lives serving the State of Tennessee

POLICE MEMORIAL, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE –
This memorial is dedicated to the officers who gave their lives serving the State of Tennessee

Nashville's Korean War Memorial -- built in 1992 and located within the city's War Memorial Plaza complex -- honors the memory of the 843  NASHVILLE'S KOREAN WAR MEMORILAL - Tennessee citizens killed during the 1950-1953 conflict.

Nashville’s Korean War Memorial — built in 1992 and located within the city’s War Memorial Plaza complex — honors the memory of the 843
Tennessee citizens killed during the 1950-1953 conflict.

Vietnam War Memorial at the Memorial Plaza -, Nashville, TN -  "Three bronze soldiers dressed in different uniforms from the Vietnam War. The figures are arranged on a circular bronze plinth. A standing soldier in the back center of the plinth wears a helmet and holds a gun in both hands. He looks over his proper right shoulder. To his proper right is a soldier kneeling on one knee, wearing a combat helmet, and holding a rifle. Another soldier kneels to his proper left, wearing no hat and holding a rifle. The figures are positioned on a roughly circular bronze plinth on a granite base."  "Three bronze soldiers dressed in different uniforms from the Vietnam War. The figures are arranged on a circular bronze plinth. A standing soldier in the back center of the plinth wears a helmet and holds a gun in both hands. He looks over his proper right shoulder. To his proper right is a soldier kneeling on one knee, wearing a combat helmet, and holding a rifle. Another soldier kneels to his proper left, wearing no hat and holding a rifle. The figures are positioned on a roughly circular bronze plinth on a granite base."  "Three bronze soldiers dressed in different uniforms from the Vietnam War. The figures are arranged on a circular bronze plinth. A standing soldier in the back center of the plinth wears a helmet and holds a gun in both hands. He looks over his proper right shoulder. To his proper right is a soldier kneeling on one knee, wearing a combat helmet, and holding a rifle. Another soldier kneels to his proper left, wearing no hat and holding a rifle. The figures are positioned on a roughly circular bronze plinth on a granite base."

Vietnam War Memorial at the Memorial Plaza -, Nashville, TN –
“Three bronze soldiers dressed in different uniforms from the Vietnam War. The figures are arranged on a circular bronze plinth. A standing soldier in the back center of the plinth wears a helmet and holds a gun in both hands. He looks over his proper right shoulder. To his proper right is a soldier kneeling on one knee, wearing a combat helmet, and holding a rifle. Another soldier kneels to his proper left, wearing no hat and holding a rifle. The figures are positioned on a roughly circular bronze plinth on a granite base.”

 Trauger & Tuke is the principal occupant of the historic Southern Turf Building in downtown Nashville, which was purchased by the firm in 1991.  The Queen Anne-style building was constructed in 1895 by a wealthy bookmaker, Marcus Cartwright.  The four-story brick structure possesses ornate detailing and rich textures with bay windows, a distinctive turret, and ironwork railing.  Located at 222 Fourth Avenue North (then Cherry Street), The Southern Turf was once one of the city's most elegant saloons, decorated with mirrors, bronze statuary, fine paintings, and marble halls.  For decades the building housed an enduring Printer's Alley fixture, Skull's Rainbow Room. It was around the turn of the century--the twilight of the Victorian Era--conservative and upright by day, that gambling and quiet prostitution were the order by night in what was known as Nashville's "Men's Quarter."  Downtown, in the shadow of William Strickland's stately neo-classical State Capitol Building, gambling, liquor establishments, and houses of ill repute did a steady business.  The only laws that were being violated by the gambling, drinking, and prostitution were moral ones.  The Men's Quarter was so much a male domain that no "decent" woman entered the area if she could avoid it.  The Southern Turf operated at full tilt.  Well-informed sources report that the saloon occupied the first floor, a gambling parlor enlivened the second floor, and a bordello was on the third floor.  The Southern Turf was "a veritable glittering palace of mirth and merriment." The glitter faded, however, when growing prohibition began to effect its operation.  In 1909 statewide prohibition passed, and the heyday of The Southern Turf and the Nashville Men's Quarter came to an end.  Cherry Street became Fourth Avenue and turned respectable. Throughout this period, Ice Johnson had managed The Southern Turf for Marcus Cartwright and resided on The Southern Turf's third floor.  When the saloon closed in 1916, Ice Johnson shot himself to death in his third floor apartment rather than leave his longtime business and residence.  Between 1916 and 1937, The Southern Turf was the home of one of Nashville's leading newspapers, The Nashville Tennessean.  The old printing presses were located in the basement, allowing newsboys to pick up their papers in Printer's Alley. After 1937, many different businesses occupied the building.  It housed a billiard hall, a restaurant, a shooting gallery, a clothing store, and a paint store.  Between 1916 and 1982 the building underwent several unfortunate "remodelings."  The interior was stripped of its formerly opulent furnishings and part of the facade was covered with unsightly modern materials.  In 1982, the building's new owners undertook a project to restore The Southern Turf to its former respectability and architectural appeal.

SOUTHERN TURF BUILDING
Trauger & Tuke is the principal occupant of the historic Southern Turf Building in downtown Nashville, which was purchased by the firm in 1991. The Queen Anne-style building was constructed in 1895 by a wealthy bookmaker, Marcus Cartwright. The four-story brick structure possesses ornate detailing and rich textures with bay windows, a distinctive turret, and ironwork railing. Located at 222 Fourth Avenue North (then Cherry Street), The Southern Turf was once one of the city’s most elegant saloons, decorated with mirrors, bronze statuary, fine paintings, and marble halls. For decades the building housed an enduring Printer’s Alley fixture, Skull’s Rainbow Room.
It was around the turn of the century–the twilight of the Victorian Era–conservative and upright by day, that gambling and quiet prostitution were the order by night in what was known as Nashville’s “Men’s Quarter.” Downtown, in the shadow of William Strickland’s stately neo-classical State Capitol Building, gambling, liquor establishments, and houses of ill repute did a steady business. The only laws that were being violated by the gambling, drinking, and prostitution were moral ones. The Men’s Quarter was so much a male domain that no “decent” woman entered the area if she could avoid it. The Southern Turf operated at full tilt. Well-informed sources report that the saloon occupied the first floor, a gambling parlor enlivened the second floor, and a bordello was on the third floor. The Southern Turf was “a veritable glittering palace of mirth and merriment.”
The glitter faded, however, when growing prohibition began to effect its operation. In 1909 statewide prohibition passed, and the heyday of The Southern Turf and the Nashville Men’s Quarter came to an end. Cherry Street became Fourth Avenue and turned respectable.
Throughout this period, Ice Johnson had managed The Southern Turf for Marcus Cartwright and resided on The Southern Turf’s third floor. When the saloon closed in 1916, Ice Johnson shot himself to death in his third floor apartment rather than leave his longtime business and residence. Between 1916 and 1937, The Southern Turf was the home of one of Nashville’s leading newspapers, The Nashville Tennessean. The old printing presses were located in the basement, allowing newsboys to pick up their papers in Printer’s Alley.
After 1937, many different businesses occupied the building. It housed a billiard hall, a restaurant, a shooting gallery, a clothing store, and a paint store. Between 1916 and 1982 the building underwent several unfortunate “remodelings.” The interior was stripped of its formerly opulent furnishings and part of the facade was covered with unsightly modern materials. In 1982, the building’s new owners undertook a project to restore The Southern Turf to its former respectability and architectural appeal.

PRINTERS ALLEY - NASHVILLE TENNESSEE  Although the Printers have long since gone, The Historic Printers Alley still remains, providing a Flair of Bourbon Street for those in search of Wine, Women and Song, with a strong tinge of Naughty. Located between Third and Fourth Avenues stretching from Union to Church Streets, the Alley started before the turn of the century as the location of many of Nashville's first Publishing and Printing Companies. Without the Country Music influences that started in the 1930's, Nashville could have possibly been known as the Printing Capitol of the World. As late as the 1960's, Nashville was home to over 36 Printing Companies and many other numerous Businesses, whose roles were, to support and supply the massive industry. In the late 1800's Printers Alley was a part of "The Men's District". Many Cafes, Saloons, Gambling Halls and Speakeasies sprang up to cater to the men of Nashville's Print shops. Judges, Lawyers, Politicians and other Nashville Elite were also known to frequent the Alley. At the turn of the Century, The Climax Club of Printers Alley was nationally known as Nashville's Premier Entertainment hotspot. Printers Alley was Nashville's dirty little secret. It didn't matter what you were looking for, you could find it there. Nashville's Politicians and Police protected the Alley even after the sale of Liquor was outlawed in the early 1900's. Hilary House, elected Mayor at the time was quoted by reporters as saying; "Protect them? I do better than that, I patronize them" He was Mayor for 21 of the 30 years that the sale of intoxicants were illegal. In 1939 Nashville repealed prohibition and made it legal to buy Liquor in stores. For the next 30 years The Alley flourished as the Mixing Bar came into existence. Although Liquor was legal, you could not buy it by the drink. Advertisements for the Clubs in the 1960's stated "Bring Your Own Bottle" and they would mix your drink for you. People would bring their choice of beverage tightly wrapped in a brown paper bag and leave it in a locker or on a shelf behind the bar of their favorite haunt. Written on those bottles were the names of Nashville's movers and shakers of the day.

PRINTERS ALLEY – NASHVILLE TENNESSEE
Although the Printers have long since gone, The Historic Printers Alley still remains, providing a Flair of Bourbon Street for those in search of Wine, Women and Song, with a strong tinge of Naughty.
Located between Third and Fourth Avenues stretching from Union to Church Streets, the Alley started before the turn of the century as the location of many of Nashville’s first Publishing and Printing Companies. Without the Country Music influences that started in the 1930’s, Nashville could have possibly been known as the Printing Capitol of the World. As late as the 1960’s, Nashville was home to over 36 Printing Companies and many other numerous Businesses, whose roles were, to support and supply the massive industry.
In the late 1800’s Printers Alley was a part of “The Men’s District”. Many Cafes, Saloons, Gambling Halls and Speakeasies sprang up to cater to the men of Nashville’s Print shops. Judges, Lawyers, Politicians and other Nashville Elite were also known to frequent the Alley. At the turn of the Century, The Climax Club of Printers Alley was nationally known as Nashville’s Premier Entertainment hotspot.
Printers Alley was Nashville’s dirty little secret. It didn’t matter what you were looking for, you could find it there.
Nashville’s Politicians and Police protected the Alley even after the sale of Liquor was outlawed in the early 1900’s. Hilary House, elected Mayor at the time was quoted by reporters as saying; “Protect them? I do better than that, I patronize them” He was Mayor for 21 of the 30 years that the sale of intoxicants were illegal.
In 1939 Nashville repealed prohibition and made it legal to buy Liquor in stores. For the next 30 years The Alley flourished as the Mixing Bar came into existence. Although Liquor was legal, you could not buy it by the drink. Advertisements for the Clubs in the 1960’s stated “Bring Your Own Bottle” and they would mix your drink for you.
People would bring their choice of beverage tightly wrapped in a brown paper bag and leave it in a locker or on a shelf behind the bar of their favorite haunt. Written on those bottles were the names of Nashville’s movers and shakers of the day.

PRINTERS ALLEY - NASHVILLE TENNESSEE

PRINTERS ALLEY – NASHVILLE TENNESSEE

PRINTERS ALLEY  -  NASHVILLE TENNESSEE

PRINTERS ALLEY – NASHVILLE TENNESSEE

PRINTERS ALLEY  -  NASHVILLE TENNESSEE

PRINTERS ALLEY – NASHVILLE TENNESSEE

PRINTERS ALLEY  -  NASHVILLE  TENNESSEE

PRINTERS ALLEY – NASHVILLE TENNESSEE

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NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE  – A WALK ON FOURTH AVENUE

FOURTH AVENUE NASHVILLE TENNESSEE

FOURTH AVENUE NASHVILLE TENNESSEE

HONKY TONK CENTRAL  -  NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

HONKY TONK CENTRAL – NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

FOURTH AVENUE, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

FOURTH AVENUE, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

TEQUILA COWBOY FOURTH AVENUE, NASHVILLE,  TENNESSEE

TEQUILA COWBOY
FOURTH AVENUE, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

NASHVILLE COUNTRY HALL OF FAME

NASHVILLE COUNTRY HALL OF FAME

NASHVILLE VISITOR CENTER

NASHVILLE VISITOR CENTER

MUSIC CITY WALK OF FAME PARK -  Nashville has its own Walk of Fame. The Music City version focuses solely on music, honoring those who have made contributions to the Nashville music scene with stars in the sidewalk. The Music City Walk of Fame is in a park across the street from the Country Music Hall of Fame, so you may think all the honorees are country artists. That’s a reasonable assumption when you pass names like Reba McEntire, Alan Jackson, and Dolly Parton. But then you’ll see a name that stops you in your tracks. What connection does Seattle-born Jimi Hendrix have to Nashville? Turns out he lived there in 1962 after he completed military service nearby. Other non-country acts recognized at the Walk of Fame include Michael McDonald, CeCe Winans, Kid Rock, Steve Winwood, and Kings of Leon, who just got their star in September.

MUSIC CITY WALK OF FAME PARK – Nashville has its own Walk of Fame. The Music City version focuses solely on music, honoring those who have made contributions to the Nashville music scene with stars in the sidewalk.
The Music City Walk of Fame is in a park across the street from the Country Music Hall of Fame, so you may think all the honorees are country artists. That’s a reasonable assumption when you pass names like Reba McEntire, Alan Jackson, and Dolly Parton. But then you’ll see a name that stops you in your tracks.
What connection does Seattle-born Jimi Hendrix have to Nashville? Turns out he lived there in 1962 after he completed military service nearby.
Other non-country acts recognized at the Walk of Fame include Michael McDonald, CeCe Winans, Kid Rock, Steve Winwood, and Kings of Leon, who just got their star in September.

PETER FRAMPTON

PETER FRAMPTON

LITTLE RICHARD

LITTLE RICHARD

DOLLY PARTON

DOLLY PARTON

NASHVILLE STREET SIGN

NASHVILLE STREET SIGN

TOOTSIES ORCHID BAR  -  Originally called Mom’s, it was renamed after Tootsie Bess bought the bar in 1960 & it was mistakenly painted orchid color. Willie Nelson, Mel Tillis, Waylon Jennings & Patsy Cline have been patrons.

TOOTSIES ORCHID LOUNGE  – Originally called Mom’s, it was renamed after Tootsie Bess bought the bar in 1960 & it was mistakenly painted orchid color. Willie Nelson, Mel Tillis, Waylon Jennings & Patsy Cline have been patrons.

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THE GRAND OLE OPRY

The Grand Ole Opry began just five years after commercial radio was born in the United States. In 1925, the National Life and Accident Insurance Company built a radio station as a public service to the local community and with the hope that the new medium could advertise insurance policies. The station’s call letters, WSM, stood for the company’s motto: “We Shield Millions.”

Soon after going on the air, National Life hired one of the nation’s most popular announcers, George D. Hay, as WSM’s first program director. Hay, a former Memphis newspaper reporter who’d most recently started a barn dance show on Chicago radio powerhouse WLS, joined the station’s staff a month after it went on the air. At 8 p.m. on November 28, 1925, Hay pronounced himself “The Solemn Old Judge” (though he was actually only 30 years old) and launched, along with championship fiddler, Uncle Jimmy Thompson, what would become the WSM Barn Dance. Hay renamed the show the Grand Ole Opry in 1927 and its popularity grew rapidly.

Crowds soon clogged fifth floor hallways within the National Life building at 7th and Union in downtown Nashville where the WSM studios were located. As more and more people showed up to watch the broadcasts, National Life built an auditorium capable of holding 500 fans. In October 1934, the show moved to the Hillsboro Theatre (now The Belcourt Theatre). Another move came two years later on June 13, 1936, to the Dixie Tabernacle – a 3,500 seat religious revival house with wooden benches, sawdust floors, and no dressing rooms – at 410 Fatherland Street in East Nashville. Next, the Opry moved to a downtown location in July 1939, the 2,200 seat War Memorial. Because the auditorium’s seating capacity was a third less than the Dixie Tabernacle, the show started charging admission – 25 cents. On June 5, 1943 the Opry moved to its most famous former home, the Ryman Auditorium where it stayed for the next 31 years.

The formative years of the Opry were spent on the Ryman stage. The music made on those well-worn planks changed music history, and Nashville, forever. On a cold December night in 1945, Earl Scruggs made his debut with Bill Monroe’s Blue Grass Boys, completing the historic line-up that would serve as the prototype for the bluegrass sound – Monroe on mandolin, Scruggs on banjo, Lester Flatt on guitar, Chubby Wise on fiddle and Howard Watts on bass. In the summer of 1949, a 25-year old Hank Williams took the stage for the first time to perform “Lovesick Blues.” The crowd gave him such an enthusiastic reception; he was called back for six encores – a house record.

The king himself, Elvis Presley, played the Opry one night in 1954. And in 1956, Johnny Cash was added to the cast. Cash met future wife June Carter for the first time backstage at the Ryman. Upon their meeting he told her he’d marry her someday – he kept his word and they were wed 12 years later. Honky-tonk angel, Patsy Cline, became an Opry member at the Ryman 1960. Cline’s biggest hit “Crazy” was written by a young up and coming songwriter, Willie Nelson.

On March 15, 1974, the Opry made its last broadcast from Ryman before moving to its new custom built home, The Grand Ole Opry House at Opryland. In 2004, the Opry House surpassed the Ryman as the Opry’s most enduring home. In May 2010 during the historic flood in Nashville, the Opry House was severely damaged and as a result received a major renovation. During the construction the Opry revisited two of its former homes, both the War Memorial Auditorium and the Ryman. The newly-improved Opry House reopened September 28, 2010. The show regularly returns to the Ryman during the winter months, November through January.

“The Grand Ole Opry celebrates country music’s diversity,” says Opry general manager Pete Fisher. “In addition, the Opry presents the many generations of artists who have formed country music’s legacy and continue to forge its future course.”

Indeed, during any given Opry show, audiences can expect the best in country, bluegrass, comedy, gospel and more by Country Music Hall of Famers, cast members who helped establish the Opry as the home of country music, revered superstars and young artists just starting to make names for themselves.

Today, there are more ways to enjoy the Grand Ole Opry than ever before. The show continues to be broadcast on 650 AM WSM as well as wsmonline.com. Also, the two-hour radio program, America’s Opry Weekend, is syndicated nationwide. Just as country greats grew up listening to the Opry on radio, future generations of Opry stars also may hear it on the Internet, on satellite radio, or via the American Forces Network.

THE GRAND OLE OPRY

THE GRAND OLE OPRY

THE GRAND OLE OPRY ACOUSTIC GUITAR

THE GRAND OLE OPRY
ACOUSTIC GUITAR

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CHEEKWOOD  BOTANICAL GARDEN AND MUSEUM OF ART

CHEEKWOOD IS A PRIVATELY FUNDED 55 ACRE ESTATE ON THE WESTERN EDGE OF NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE, THAT HOUSES THE CHEEKWOOD BOTANICAL GARDEN AND THE MUSEUM OF ART.

Formerly the residence of Nashville’s Cheek family, the 30,000-square-foot mansion was opened as a museum in 1960.

The history and origin of Cheekwood are intimately interwoven with the growth of Nashville, the Maxwell House coffee brand and the Cheeks, one of the city’s early entrepreneurial families.

Christopher T. Cheek moved to Nashville in the 1880’s and founded a wholesale grocery business. His son, Leslie Cheek, joined him as a partner.

In 1896, Leslie Cheek married Mabel Wood of Clarksville, Tennessee. Their son, Leslie Jr., was born in 1908 and their daughter, Huldah, in 1915. By that year, Leslie Cheek was president of the family firm.

During these same years, the elder Cheeks cousin, Joel Cheek, developed a superior blend of coffee that was marketed through the best hotel in Nashville, the Maxwell House. His extended family, including Leslie and Mabel Cheek, were investors. In 1928, Postum (now General Foods) purchased Maxwell House’s parent company, Cheek-Neal Coffee, for more than $40 million.

With their income secured by the proceeds from the sale, the Cheeks bought 100 acres of what was then woodland in West Nashville for a country estate. To design and build the house and grounds, they hired New York residential and landscape architect, Bryant Fleming, and gave him control over every detail – from landscaping to interior furnishings. The result was a limestone mansion and extensive formal gardens inspired by the grand English houses of the 18th century. Fleming’s masterpiece, Cheekwood, was completed in 1932.

Leslie and Mabel Cheek moved into the mansion in January 1933. Leslie Cheek lived at Cheekwood for just two years before his death at 61.

In 1943, Mabel Cheek deeded the house to her daughter, Huldah Cheek Sharp, and her husband, Walter Sharp. The Sharps lived at Cheekwood until the 1950s when they offered it as a site for a botanical garden and art museum.

The development of the property was spearheaded by the Exchange Club of Nashville, the Horticultural Society of Middle Tennessee and many other civic groups. The Nashville Museum of Art donated its permanent collections and proceeds from the sale of its building to the effort. The new Cheekwood opened to the public in 1960.

ART MUSEUM
Cheekwood’s art collection was founded in 1959 upon the holdings of the former [[Nashville Museum of Art]] and is accredited by the [[American Alliance of Museums]]. The core holdings include broad collections of American art; American and British decorative arts; contemporary art, especially outdoor sculpture acquired for the Woodland Sculpture Trail.

Cheekwood’s American art collection includes 600 paintings and 5,000 prints, drawings and photographs. The collection, assembled in the 1980s and early 1990s through a multi-million dollar bequest, spans the history of American art. Its strength centers on [[The Eight (Nyolcak)|The Eight]]. Other strengths include the world’s largest collection of sculptures of [[William Edmondson]], photographs by [[Louise Dahl-Wolfe]], and a vast variety of post-[[Second World War]] prints. Recently, the Museum has pursued a consciously focused acquisition process, having added paintings by James Hamilton, [[William Bradford (painter)|William Bradford]], and new contemporary sculpture for the Trail.

The core holdings of the decorative arts collection include the third-largest [[Worcester]] porcelain in the [[United States]], and a 650-piece silver collection, spanning the 18th-20th centuries.

The Cheek Mansion is itself considered part of the collection. The renovation restored much of the original building, which revealed authentic features (wood and marble floors that had been carpeted), and conserved historical architectural motifs, such as the illusionist murals that line the main corridor.

The Contemporary Art collection, housed in the galleries created out of the estate’s original garage and stables, is small but of high quality, including paintings by [[Larry Rivers]], [[Andy Warhol]], [[Robert Ryman]], [[Red Grooms]], and [[Marylyn Dintenfass]]. Additionally, seven small galleries were created in the old horse stable stalls to enable Cheekwood to display installation art.

The Carrell Woodland Sculpture Trail, a collection of fifteen sculptures by international artists, extends the contemporary art collection into nature, focusing on a kind of intimate, outdoor art not commonly found in American museums.

BOTANICAL GARDEN

Extending across the grounds from the Museum of Art, the Botanical Garden encompasses the entire site

CHEEKWOOD MANSION

CHEEKWOOD MANSION

CHEEKWOOD hosted  the second-ever North American exhibition of Light, a stunning outdoor art installation by acclaimed British artist Bruce Munro. Using an inventive array of materials and hundreds of miles of glowing optic fiber, Munro’s fascination with light as an artistic medium has transformed Cheekwood’s beautiful gardens into an enchanting, dream-like landscape.

WATER TOWERS

WATER TOWERS

WATER TOWERS

WATER TOWERS

WATER TOWER

WATER TOWER

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JOHNSONVILLE STATE HISTORIC PARK,  TENNESSEE

Johnsonville State Historic Park is located on the east bank of Kentucky Lake just three miles north of U.S. Hwy 70 and the town of New Johnsonville. This 600-acre park overlooks the site of a unique Civil War Battle, the Battle of Johnsonville.

Johnsonville State Historic Park is named for Tennessean Andrew Johnson, Union Military Governor during the Civil War and Seventeenth President of the United States. This 2000-acre park located in Humphreys County, commemorates the site of the Battle of Johnsonville and the historic town site that existed from 1864-1944 prior to the formation of Kentucky Lake.

At Johnsonville on November 4, 1864, Confederate Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest’s cavalry took up artillery positions on the western bank of the Tennessee River. Forrest’s confederates sank four Federal gunboats and transports and finished out the day by destroying the Union supply depot at Johnsonville. This Confederate victory, however, was too late. As a result, Union General William T. Sherman managed to cut his own supply lines (including Johnsonville) and instead commence living “off the land” as his troops left Atlanta and embarked on his famous march through Georgia.

JOHNSONVILLE  1864

JOHNSONVILLE 1864

JOHNSONVILLE  1864

JOHNSONVILLE 1864

JOHNSONVILLE  1864

JOHNSONVILLE 1864

ENTRANCE TO THE JOHNSONVILLE EXHIBIT

ENTRANCE TO THE JOHNSONVILLE EXHIBIT

TABLEAU SHOWING THE ATTACK ON THE UNION SUPPLY DEPOT AT JOHNSONVILLE

TABLEAU SHOWING THE ATTACK ON THE UNION SUPPLY DEPOT AT JOHNSONVILLE

TABLEAU SHOWING FORMER SLAVES BEING PUT TO WORK ON THE RAILROAD BY THE MILITARY AUTHORITIES

TABLEAU SHOWING FORMER SLAVES BEING PUT TO WORK ON THE RAILROAD BY THE MILITARY AUTHORITIES

TABLEAU SHOWING A UNION OFFICER WITH A CANNON FACING THE RIVER

TABLEAU SHOWING A UNION OFFICER WITH A CANNON FACING THE RIVER

PLAQUE  EXPLAINING WHAT HAPPENED AT JOHNSONVILLE

PLAQUE EXPLAINING WHAT HAPPENED AT JOHNSONVILLE

THE BATTLE OF JOHNSONVILLE EXPLAINED

THE BATTLE OF JOHNSONVILLE
EXPLAINED

CONFERDERATE SOLDIERS HUTS ALONG THE RIVER

CONFERDERATE SOLDIERS HUTS ALONG THE RIVER

HUTS WERE SMALL 9 X9 FEET

HUTS WERE SMALL  9 X 9  FEET

CANNONS ALONG THE TENNESSEE RIVER

CANNONS ALONG THE TENNESSEE RIVER

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GRACELAND

GRACELAND

GRACELAND

Graceland is a large white-columned mansion and 13.8-acre (5.6 ha) estate in Memphis, Tennessee, that was home to Elvis Presley. It is located at 3764 Elvis Presley Boulevard in the vast Whitehaven community about 9 miles (14.5 km) from Downtown and less than four miles (6 km) north of the mississippi border. It currently serves as a museum. It was opened to the public on June 7, 1982.  Graceland has become one of the most-visited private homes in America with over 600,000 visitors a year.The most famous icon of the estate is the front gate, shaped like a book of sheet music, with green colored musical notes, and a silhouette of Elvis, it has come to symbolize the estate more than the mansion itself.

Elvis Presley died at the estate on August 16, 1977. Presley, his parents Gladys and Vernon Presley, and his grandmother, are buried there in what is called the Meditation Garden. A memorial gravestone for Presley’s stillborn twin brother, Jesse Garon, is also at the site.

GRACELAND MANSION

GRACELAND MANSION

GRACELAND MANSION FOYER  -    Mansion Foyer The foyer is where special guests were greeted and shown to the living room where they would wait for Elvis to come down the stairs from his private area upstairs. Elvis would often entertain his guests on his 15-foot white sofa inside the living room. At the far end of the living room is the entrance into the music room where Elvis enjoyed singing and playing piano to his favorite gospel and R&B songs. Across the foyer from the living room - is the dining room where Elvis and his family would enjoy down-home Southern cooking for their evening meals. These rooms hosted many large gatherings and is where Elvis enjoyed the company of his friends and family.

GRACELAND MANSION FOYER – Mansion Foyer
The foyer is where special guests were greeted and shown to the living room where they would wait for Elvis to come down the stairs from his private area upstairs. Elvis would often entertain his guests on his 15-foot white sofa inside the living room. At the far end of the living room is the entrance into the music room where Elvis enjoyed singing and playing piano to his favorite gospel and R&B songs. Across the foyer from the living room – is the dining room where Elvis and his family would enjoy down-home Southern cooking for their evening meals. These rooms hosted many large gatherings and is where Elvis enjoyed the company of his friends and family.

GRACELAND -  LIVING ROOM

GRACELAND – LIVING ROOM

ELVIS AND HIS PARENTS

ELVIS AND HIS PARENTS

GRACELAND - ELVIS BEDROOM

GRACELAND – ELVIS BEDROOM

GRACELAND  -  ELVIS DINING ROOM

GRACELAND – ELVIS DINING ROOM

PHPTPS AND RECORDS WHEN ELVIS WAS RECORDING AT SUN STUDIOS IN MEMPHIS

PHPTPS AND RECORDS WHEN ELVIS WAS RECORDING AT SUN STUDIOS IN MEMPHIS

MONITORS SHOWING ELVIS MOVIES

MONITORS SHOWING ELVIS MOVIES

MONITORS SHOWING ELVIS MOVIES

MONITORS SHOWING ELVIS MOVIES

ELVIS -OUTSTANDING MAN OF THE YEAR AWARD SHOW

ELVIS -OUTSTANDING MAN OF THE YEAR AWARD SHOW

ELVIS HAD MANY COSTUMES AND GOLD RECORDS

ELVIS HAD MANY COSTUMES AND GOLD RECORDS

MEDITATION GARDEN  -   Elvis Presley lived at Graceland Mansion until his death on August 16, 1977. Originally, Elvis Presley was buried at Forest Hill Cemetery in Memphis, Tennessee. A group of men tried to steal Elvis Presley's coffin. The grave sites of Presley's parents, Gladys and Veron Presley, were also at risk. So in October 1977, the family was moved to Graceland. They were re-interred in the Meditation Garden, which Elvis Presley created during the mid-1960s as a place for quiet reflection. He is buried beneath an angel sculpture.

MEDITATION GARDEN – Elvis Presley lived at Graceland Mansion until his death on August 16, 1977.
Originally, Elvis Presley was buried at Forest Hill Cemetery in Memphis, Tennessee. A group of men tried to steal Elvis Presley’s coffin. The grave sites of Presley’s parents, Gladys and Veron Presley, were also at risk. So in October 1977, the family was moved to Graceland. They were re-interred in the Meditation Garden, which Elvis Presley created during the mid-1960s as a place for quiet reflection. He is buried beneath an angel sculpture.

GRACELAND  -   The Presley family gravestone at Graceland

GRACELAND – The Presley family gravestone at Graceland

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ELVIS PRESLEY CAR MUSEUM


“Elvis loved cars and the Elvis Presley Automobile Museum displays some of his favorites. Stroll down a tree-lined street to see over 33 vehicles owned by Elvis. Highlights include his famous Pink Cadillac, Harley-Davidson motorcycles, Stutz Blackhawks, a 1975 Dino Ferrari, a 1956 Cadillac Eldorado Convertible, the red MG from Blue Hawaii .”

ELVIS PRESLEY AUTOMOBILE MUSEUM ENTRANCE

ELVIS PRESLEY AUTOMOBILE MUSEUM ENTRANCE

ELVIS PRESLEY ROLLS ROYCE

ELVIS PRESLEY ROLLS ROYCE

The first car into Elvis Presley Automobile Museum is a beautiful, slick white Mercedes 280SL that he brought for Priscilla. So pretty! What a lucky girl!

The first car into Elvis Presley Automobile Museum is a beautiful, slick white Mercedes 280SL that he brought for Priscilla. So pretty! What a lucky girl!

1955 Cadillac Fleetwood. Elvis used this car touring and then gave the car to his mom. He often referred to it as "Glady's Car".

1955 Cadillac Fleetwood. Elvis used this car touring and then gave the car to his mom. He often referred to it as “Glady’s Car”.

ELVIS LINCOLN CONTINENTAL

ELVIS LINCOLN CONTINENTAL

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ELVIS PRESLEY AIRPLANES AT GRACELAND

On April 17, 1975 Elvis bought a Convair 880 Jet, recently taken out of service by Delta Airlines, for the then-substantial sum of $250,000. After refurbishing, the total exceeded $600,000.

He immediately rechristened it the Lisa Marie.

Earlier Elvis had paid a $75,000 deposit on a Boeing 707 but the deal fell through. The previous owner had been Robert Vesco, the fugitive financier who had fled to South America after allegedly embezzling hundreds of millions of dollars from international investment firms. Buying his plane would involve some complicated wrangling with the IRS. And Elvis was warned about another complication: If the plane ever landed in any of the countries Vesco was establishing a base in, there was every reason to believe that he might try to seize it.

The Convair 880 had a clean record and would have no problem flying to any country around the globe.

The plane was in a hangar at Meacham Field in Fort Worth, and for months Elvis took great pleasure in flying friends out to check on progress as the interior of the plane was refurbished to his very specific design requirements (he bought another plane to make those trips – a smaller Lockheed JetStar). Elvis wanted a seating area, a conference room, and a private bedroom on the plane (with space for an in-flight reading library). He picked fabrics, decided on color schemes, chose the on-board audio-visual system, and even Ok’d the gold fixtures in the bathrooms with Priscilla.

Elvis was especially excited about the fact that the same design team had previously customized  Air Force One. The craft slowly came together as an airworthy mix of modem function and Graceland elegance.

Close in size to a 707, the Lisa Marie was customized with plush sleeping quarters, a penthouse bedroom with a custom-made queen size bed, an executive bathroom with gold faucets and a gold washbasin, a videotape system linked to four TVs and a stereo system with fifty-two speakers, and a conference room finished in teak

 
 
On April 17, 1975 Elvis bought a Convair 880 Jet, recently taken out of service by Delta Airlines, for the then-substantial sum of $250,000. After refurbishing, the total exceeded $600,000.

– See more at: http://www.elvis.com.au/presley/lisa_marie_convair_880_jet.shtml#sthash.WyMR2FnD.dpuf

It could hold a maximum of 29 people, but usually there would be about eight or 10. When the final paint job was applied to the exterior, there was a prominent ‘TCB‘ logo on the tail.

THE LISA AMRIE

THE LISA MARIE

THE LISA MARIE INTERIOR

THE LISA MARIE INTERIOR

Next to it is Elvis’ smaller Lockheed Jet Star that was primarily used for taking Elvis’ manager and his staff from city to city on his concert tours. This Lockheed jetstar was dubbed the Hounddog II.

HOUNDDOG II

HOUND DOG II

HOUND DOG II  INTERIOR

HOUND DOG II INTERIOR

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TUPELO, MISSISSIPPI  –  BIRTHPLACE OF ELVIS PRESLEY

 

Elvis Aaron Presley was born in Tupelo, Mississippi on January 8, 1935 to Vernon and Gladys Presley. Born in a two-room house built by his father, grandfather and uncle, Elvis was one of twin brothers born to the Presleys. His brother, Jessie Garon was stillborn. Elvis grew up in Tupelo surrounded by his extended family including his grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins.

Financially, times were hard on Vernon and Gladys, and they had to move out of the house where Elvis was born when he was only a few years old for lack of payment. Vernon and Gladys worked various jobs while in Tupelo and moved several different times during the thirteen years they resided in Mississippi.

While in Tupelo, Elvis attended the Assembly of God Church with his family where he was first exposed to gospel music that influenced his musical style throughout his career. It was in Tupelo that Elvis was exposed to bluesmen in the Shake Rag community where he lived for a time. His family also listened to country music radio programs from which Elvis drew influence. In 1945, Elvis made his first public radio broadcast. At ten years old, Elvis stood on a chair and sang “Old Shep” in a youth talent contest at the Mississippi-Alabama Fair and Dairy Show at the Tupelo Fairgrounds. WELO Radio broadcast the talent show, and Elvis won the second prize of $5 and free admission to all the fair rides.

In 1946, Elvis and his mother went to Tupelo Hardware where Elvis wanted to purchase a .22 caliber rifle. Gladys persuaded Elvis to look at a guitar, which store employees allowed him to try out. Elvis decided that he wanted the guitar, which his mother purchased for him, and his pastor taught him how to play it. Elvis could often be seen around town with his guitar in hand. In 1948, Elvis played his guitar and sang a farewell tribute to his Milam Junior High class before moving to Memphis where his father hoped to make a better life for his family.

Nine years later, Elvis returned to the fairgrounds and performed a benefit concert for the City of Tupelo. After his triumphant homecoming concert at the fairgrounds in September 1956, Elvis returned on September 27, 1957 and performed a benefit concert to raise money to build a Youth Center and park for Tupelo. The proceeds were used to purchase his birthplace and make a park for the neighborhood children. The Elvis Presley Birthplace Park now consist of the Birthplace, Museum, Chapel, Gift Shop, “Elvis at 13” statue, Fountain of Life, Walk of Life, “Memphis Bound” car feature and Story Wall

ELVIS PRESLEY BIRTHPLACE AND BOYHOOD HOME

ELVIS PRESLEY BIRTHPLACE AND BOYHOOD HOME. The house is a small shotgun house with two rooms, a kitchen and a bedroom.

SIGN IN FRONT OF ELVIS BOYHOOD HOME

SIGN IN FRONT OF ELVIS BOYHOOD HOME

ELVIS BOYHOOD HOME KITCHEN

ELVIS BOYHOOD HOME  –  KITCHEN

EIVIS PRESLEY BOYHOOD HOME - BEDROOM AND THE FIREPLACE

EIVIS PRESLEY BOYHOOD HOME – BEDROOM WITH FIREPLACE

FIRST ASEMBLY OF GOD CHURCH THAT ELVIS ATTENDED AS A CHILD

FIRST ASEMBLY OF GOD CHURCH THAT ELVIS ATTENDED AS A CHILD

ELVIS PRESLEY CHILDHOOD CHURCH

ELVIS PRESLEY CHILDHOOD CHURCH

STATUE OF ELVIS AT AGE 13

STATUE OF ELVIS AT AGE 13

ELVIS COUNTRY

ELVIS COUNTRY

ELVIS PRESLEY AND THE BLUES

ELVIS PRESLEY AND THE BLUES

THE STORY WAL

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MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE

Memphis, the largest city in Tennessee and the seat of Shelby County, is located in the southwest corner of the state, on the Mississippi Rivernear the borders of Arkansas and Mississippi.

The first settlers of Memphis were the Chickasaw Indians, who had a village named Chisca there on the bluffs overlooking the Mississippi River. Hernando de Soto,  in 1541, is said to have had his first glimpse of the Mississippi from the site of Memphis; in the next century, Louis Joliet and Jacques Marquette stopped there to trade with the Indians. The French explorer Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salletried to claim the region for France in 1682 and built Fort Prudhomme on the site.

The area was ceded to the United States by the Chickasaw Indians in 1818. Memphis was officially established in 1819 by three enterprising businessmen from Nashville, James Winchester, John Overton, and future president Andrew Jackson. Jackson named it after the ancient Egyptian city because of its site on the Nile-like Mississippi River. Memphis was incorporated as a city in 1826 and became an important Mississippi River port.

During the Civil War, Memphis was a Confederate military center. In 1862, federal forces won a gunboat battle on the river at Memphis, and General Sherman was able to take the city. After the war, Memphis’s population was devastated by several yellow-fever epidemics during the 1870s. As a result, the city fell into decline and went bankrupt, losing its charter in 1879. However, owing to its superior location, the city was able to recover economically, and a new city charter was granted in 1893.

Memphis is known as “America’s Distribution Center,” serving the northeast, southeast, and southwest regions of the country. The city has one of the country’s largest inland ports and is the national headquarters for the Fed Ex air-courier company. Health care and related activities such as medical education and biomedical research are Memphis’s largest industries, bringing over $5 billion a year to the local economy.

Many of the city’s tourist attractions are landmarks associated with the great Memphis music legends, such as Graceland, Elvis Presley’s home.

MEMPHIS TROLLEYS

MATA’s vintage trolley rail system has become a part of downtown Memphis culture and is a tourist attraction all on its own.  2013 will mark the trolley’s 20-year milestone since the Main Street line first graced the mall and began transporting millions through the heart of the city.  Notable destinations along the trolley lines include the famous Pinch District, Cook Convention Center, Sun Studio, Peabody Place, Beale Street, the National Civil Rights Museum, the FedEx Forum, the Medical Center, and South Main’s Historic Arts District.
The Main Street Line, the first and most iconic rail line in Memphis, began operating in April 1993.  In the next four years, MATA introduced the Riverfront Line that runs along the Mississippi River and on Main Street.  The latest addition to the trolley rail system was the Madison Avenue Line, which began operating in March 2004.

A total of 19 vintage trolleys are  in service, covering over 259,000 revenue miles annually on 10 route miles of track.  Each vintage trolley is over 40 years old and has been restored to its original elegance – down to the solid brass seats and window accents, rare “glue-chip” glass transom windows, hand-carved mahogany corbels, and antique lighting fixtures.

MEMPHIS TROLLEY  RIVERFRONT LOOP

MEMPHIS TROLLEY
RIVERFRONT LOOP

MEMPHIS TROLLEY

MEMPHIS TROLLEY

MEMPHIS TROLLEY MAIN STREET LINE

MEMPHIS TROLLEY
MAIN STREET LINE

MEMPHIS TROLLEY

MEMPHIS TROLLEY

MEMPHIS TROLLEY INTERIOR AT NIGHT

MEMPHIS TROLLEY INTERIOR AT NIGHT

MEMPHIS TROLLEY CONTROLS

MEMPHIS TROLLEY CONTROLS

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MEMPHIS MUSIC SCENE

Memphis is the birthplace of rock and roll. Situated on the northernmost edge of the Mississippi Delta, the city has long been a musical and cultural magnet for artists from throughout the South.  In the Twenties, it lured blues musicians eager to forge a living in the saloons along Beale Street.  As the first stopping-off point for black sharecroppers and their families heading north during the Depression and war years of the Thirties and Forties, Memphis’ musical culture was further transformed by transients with diverse influences and styles.

Sam Phillips, who worked at a local radio station, was the visionary who brought rock and roll into the world.  Phillips opened the Memphis Recording Service in 1950 and in short order recorded such legendary bluesman as B.B. King, James Cotton and Howlin’ Wolf.  In 1951, he cut a single with Ike Turner’s ban, featuring Jackie Brenston on lead vocals. The song, “Rocket 88,” has been hailed as the first rock and roll record.

In July 1954, two years after forming his own label, Sun Records, Phillips released the first single by Elvis Presley. Pairing uptempo cover versions of Arthur Crudup’s blues tune “That’s All Right” with Bill Monroe’s bluegrass waltz ‘Blue Moon of Kentucky,” Phillips found a combination he long had sought: a singer whose style seamlessly incorporated elements of gospel, country and blues powered by unrelenting rhythm.  Phillips went on to discover and record new talent at a dizzying pace: Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash, Roy Orbison and Jerry Lee Lewis all began their careers at Sun.

What transpired in Memphis changed popular music and ignited a revolution in popular culture.  Despite changing tastes and ever-shifting trends, Memphis and Sun Records still embody the simplicity, the intensity and the individuality common to the most enduring rock and roll.

BEALE STREET, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE

In the heart of downtown Memphis with three blocks of nightclubs, restaurants and retail shops, the Beale Street entertainment district is a melting pot of delta blues, jazz, rock ‘n’ roll, R&B and gospel.

Beale originally was home to traders and merchants that used the convenient location to move goods along the Mississippi River. By the 1860s, many traveling musicians began performing on Beale and over the next few decades, Beale began to flourish. The Orpheum Theater, “The South’s Finest Theatre” was added in 1890 and in 1899 Robert Church (the first black millionaire in the south who purchased the land around Beale) created Church Park at the corner of 4th and Beale. Church wanted to give musicians a place to gather. At that point, Beale slowly began transforming into a recreational and social center, where folks could unite and listen to music.

In the early 1900’s a young man by the name of W. C. Handy made his mark on the city by creating hit songs like “Blues on Beale Street” and “Mr. Crump” (for a local mayoral candidate). Handy’s influence ran deep and from the 1920s to the 1940s, other blues and jazz legends like Albert King, Louis Armstrong, Memphis Minnie, Muddy Waters, and B.B. King (B.B. stands for Blues Boy) all performed on Beale. Their influence created a style known as Memphis Blues.

In 1966, Beae Street was dclared a National Historic landmark, and in 1977, Beale Street was officially declared the Home of the Blues by an act of Congress.

Today, all you need to do is take a stroll down Beale Street’s neon row and you’ll hear music spilling out of clubs and restaurants like Rum Boogie Café, B.B. King’s, Silky O’Sullivan’s or the Hardrock Cafe Beale Street is serious about its music, and jam sessions at many of these clubs tend to go deep into the night.

BEALE STREET AT NIGHT

BEALE STREET
AT NIGHT

BB King's Blues Club and Restaurant

BB King’s Blues Club and Restaurant

BB King's Blues Club and Restaurant   - House Band

BB King’s Blues Club and Restaurant – House Band

B.B. King, King of the Blues

Christine Wilson is director of publications for the Mississippi Department of Archives and History and managing editor of The Journal of Mississippi History, the quarterly publication of the Mississippi Historical Society.

In the late 1940s in Indianola, Mississippi, a young man named Riley King was singing and playing guitar with his friends in a group called the “Famous St. John’s Gospel Singers.” They played in churches around the Delta and even went to the stations in Greenwood and Greenville and sang on the radio – they were that good.

At night Riley King changed hats and played blues on Indianola street corners for tips. He said later that when he played gospel music he got a pat on the head, but when he played the blues he got a dime. He didn’t have much money, and dimes were worth a lot more in the 1940s in Indianola than they are now. (He made only $15 driving a farm tractor all day.)

In 1946 King tried to convince the Singers to leave Indianola and seek their fortune together as a professional group. When they refused, he packed his bags and took off for the music town of Memphis, Tennessee, to live with his cousin, bluesman Bukka White. Musicians gravitated to Memphis from small towns all around. Beale Street – “the Home of the Blues” – was there, and Sam Phillips, of later Sun Records fame, had just arrived in 1945 and set up a recording studio.

Radio station WDIAKing immediately began playing around town, but his luck wasn’t running right, and later that year he went back to Indianola to his tractor job to make some money. After two years at home he was ready to try again and headed back to Memphis. This time he got a break: Sonny Boy Williamson let him play a song on his legendary radio show out of West Memphis. It led to his landing a ten-minute spot on the black-staffed radio station WDIA in Memphis, a spot that was so popular King got his own show, sponsored by Peptikon Tonic. (King wrote the jingle: “Peptikon sure is good/ You can get it anywhere in your neighborhood.”) Now that he was the hot new disc jockey in town, he needed a catchy name: “Beale Street Blues Boy” was shortened to “Blues Boy King” and finally to B.B. King. His close friends called him “B.”

King played all the great blues on his show, naturally – including the “jump blues” by boogie pianists and shouters like Wynonie Harris and Louis Jordan and the Texas-style blues of Lowell Fulson and T- Bone Walker. He played other music, too: jazz, especially jazz featuring inventive guitarists like Charley Christian and the French Django Reinhardt, whom King had heard about from friends just back home from overseas military service.

The biggest fan of B.B. King’s radio show was, of course, King himself. The music was the most important thing in his life – the blues, the jazz, the gospel, and all the music in between – and he was determined to find a way to play his music for all those fans tuning in to his show.

A string of hitsKing started to make some money at the talent shows held between movies at the downtown Palace Theatre. In 1949 he cut several records for Nashville’s Bullet label and then several in Sam Phillips’s studio for Modern Records on the RPM label. In 1951 he recorded “Three O’clock Blues” for RPM on a portable tape recorder in the Memphis YMCA. By the end of that year it was at the top of the rhythm and blues charts and stayed there for fifteen weeks. “Three O’clock Blues” proved to be a turning point of B.B. King’s career.

With deep roots in the Delta blues and gospel music, King admired the bottleneck guitar sounds he heard his cousin Bukka White coaxing from his guitar back around the apartment. So he used his fingers – large, strong fingers – to stretch the strings, developing a technique that would become the basis of the B.B. King style.

He had a solid string of hits during the next few years. While King’s voice had carried his early music, now there was another voice in the music. He had taught his guitar to sing. His music began to be marked by strong guitar solos of clean, biting, single notes and left-hand vibratos. He was backed up by large bands with full horn sections (saxophones, trumpets, trombones), but that single plucked note and King’s voice pulled you back in close, underlining the power of such slow blues songs as “Every Day I Have the Blues,” “The Thrill is Gone,” and “Sweet Little Angel.”

Essence of the bluesThat soulful, wailing guitar was grounded by King’s voice: one that had been in pain, but had survived it – survived all those stormy Mondays, his sweet angel’s flying away, the loss of the thrill. It was, after all, the voice of a man who had survived growing up poor in the Mississippi Delta, who had survived the death of his brother and his mother before he had reached the age of ten and had lived alone until he was fourteen.

Like others, B.B. King earned the right to sing the blues, and he enunciates every word because he wants to be heard and understood: “Every day, every day I have the blues.” Perhaps he communicates the essence of the blues, defined by jazz musician Branford Marsalis as “the consummate state of optimism: I got the blues, but it’s all right.” Or, as King himself says, “The blues is pain, but it’s pain that brings joy.”

The story of Lucille illustrates B.B. King’s down-to-earth attitude about the blues and about life in general. In the mid-1950s he was performing at a dance in Twist, Arkansas, when some men began fighting and knocked over a kerosene stove, starting a fire. The crowd got out safely, including King. But then he realized that he’d left his beloved $30 acoustic guitar inside and rushed back inside the burning building to retrieve it. He narrowly survived the ordeal. He later learned the men had been fighting over a woman named Lucille, and he named his guitar Lucille as a kind of lesson, to never do anything such as that again. Ever since, King’s trademark Gibson guitars have all been called Lucille.

In 1968, King played at the Newport Folk Festival and at the Fillmore West in San Francisco with top rock musicians. He gradually found himself playing to white audiences as often as black, if not more. In 1969, King was chosen by the Rolling Stones to open for them on an American tour.

Part of B.B. King’s appeal is his endearing onstage presence. He wrestles with Lucille to pull out those heart-breaking notes, showing his anguish in his distorted expressions. “My eyes are closed. I forget what I look like,” he says. “In fact, I don’t care what I look like because the feeling that I got through what I’m doin’ is so important.”

King kept on touring over the years to become probably the most widely known blues singer in history. For more than fifty years he has played to audiences across the United States and the world. He was the first to introduce blues to Japanese, Russian, and Chinese audiences. King has released over fifty albums, many of them classics. He continues to tour, playing over 200 concerts a year around the world.

B.B. King was inducted into the Blues Foundation Hall of Fame in 1984 and into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987. In 1991 B.B. King’s Blues Club opened on Beale Street in Memphis, and in 1994, a second club opened in Los Angeles. Now there is a club on Times Square in New York City.

A museum for the King of BluesEvery year in June, B.B. King comes back to Indianola, Mississippi, to play a free Homecoming Concert and to play at the annual Medgar Wiley Evers Memorial Festival. Born September 16, 1925, near Itta Bena, King moved to Indianola as a young man, and he considers it home. In 2005 a documentary was made of King’s visit to Indianola’s Club Ebony – a tiny club that helped launch his career – by Mississippi Public Broadcasting and the B.B. King Museum and Foundation.

On June 10, 2005, the Foundation kicked off phase one of planning and building for the 2.3-acre B. B. King Museum complex in Indianola with a groundbreaking ceremony. The kickoff was an 80th birthday gift for King. Three years later, in September 2008, the $15 million B. B. King Museum and Delta Interpretive Center had its grand opening. The museum itself is housed in the Last Brick Cotton Gin, where King worked in the 1940s. The complex tells King’s life story, much of it narrated by King himself, including his difficult childhood in the Mississippi Delta and the early days of his career in Memphis. A replica of the WDIA radio studio and a recording studio, where visitors are offered hands on experience at mixing an actual recording, is featured. The adjacent Delta Interpretive Center promotes a curriculum of education and cultural outreach for at-risk youngsters of the mostly poor Delta region.

PIG ON BEALE STREET  - FAMOUS BARBEQUE RESTAURANT

PIG ON BEALE STREET –
FAMOUS BARBEQUE RESTAURANT

WET WILLIES  - FAMOUS BURGER JOINT - MEMPHIS

WET WILLIES – FAMOUS BURGER JOINT – MEMPHIS

RUM-BOOGIE- CAFE CAJUN AND BARBEQUE MENU

RUM-BOOGIE- CAFE
CAJUN AND BARBEQUE MENU

BEALE STREET MEMPHIS  AN OUTDOOR MUSIC VENUE

BEALE STREET MEMPHIS
AN OUTDOOR MUSIC VENUE

THE BLUES CITY CAFE ON BEALE STREET  AS SEEN DURING THE DAY

THE BLUES CITY CAFE ON BEALE STREET AS SEEN DURING THE DAY

Beale Street Walk of Fame
Between 2nd and 3rd, musical notes embedded in the concrete mark the Walk of Fame, where some of Memphis’ finest musicians are honored.

JOHNNY CASH

JOHNNY CASH

SAM PHILLIPS

SAM PHILLIPS

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BELZ MUSEUM OF ASIAN AND JUDAIC ART

The Belz Museum of Asian & Judaic Art, founded in 1998, may be one of the newer museums in Memphis, but  the museum houses the largest and most comprehensive collection of Asian art in the southern region of the United States. The collection of more than 900 objects ranges from 202 BC to the early 20th century and includes intricately carved jades, ivories, sculptures, paintings cermics, lacquer, textiles and funerary art. The artwork from the Qing dynasty was created by artisans and craftsmen who spent many years perfecting each piece to convey the patronage of the Qing court, resulting in some of the most exquisite treasures the world has ever seen.

In addition to the Asian collection, the collection of Judaica (historical and literal pieces relating to Judaism) reflects the artistic journey to some of Israel’s most celebrated contemporary artists including Daniel Kafri and Ofra Friedland.

 

Shizi Guardian Lions Late 19th Century; associated with the last Emperor, Xuangdong, Pu Yi (1908-1911) Nephrite 38 1/2" H.- 42.4392 These lions are the earlier pair of a series, and the model for other versions from the Imperial Palace in Beijing. The tradition of the temple lions, or "foo dogs" as Westerners call them, began with the Ming Dynasty when the Emperor Wu placed them at the entrances to his royal palace.

Shizi Guardian Lions
Late 19th Century; associated with the last Emperor,
Xuangdong, Pu Yi (1908-1911)
Nephrite
38 1/2″ H.- 42.4392
These lions are the earlier pair of a series, and the model for other versions from the Imperial Palace in Beijing. The tradition of the temple lions, or “foo dogs” as Westerners call them, began with the Ming Dynasty when the Emperor Wu placed them at the entrances to his royal palace.

CARVED JADE QING DYNASTY

CARVED JADE
QING DYNASTY

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS JADE BOAT

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS
JADE BOAT

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS JADE HORSES

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS
JADE HORSES

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS PAIR OF BRAYING CAMELS QING DYNASTY  JADE

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS
PAIR OF BRAYING CAMELS
QING DYNASTY
JADE

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS JADE CARVING QING DYNASTY

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS
JADE CARVING QING DYNASTY

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS EAGLE QING DYNATY JASPER, TIGER'S EYE

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS
EAGLE QING DYNATY
JASPER, TIGER’S EYE

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS IVORY  QING DYNASTY

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS
IVORY
QING DYNASTY

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS MONGOLIAN INCENSE PAGODA QING DYNASTY SILVER, JADE AND PRECIOUS STONES

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS
MONGOLIAN INCENSE PAGODA
QING DYNASTY
SILVER, JADE AND PRECIOUS STONES

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS QING DYNASTY  CARVED IVORY

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS
QING DYNASTY
CARVED IVORY

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS QING DYNASTY WITH CARVED MAMMOTH IVORY TUSK

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS
QING DYNASTY
WITH CARVED MAMMOTH IVORY TUSK

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS

BELZ MUSEUM MEMPHIS

————————————————

POEM:

Memphis

 

             John Townsend Trowbridge

At last he seemed to lose it altogether
Upon the Mississippi; where he stayed
His course at Memphis, undecided whether
He should go back or forward. Here he strayed
One afternoon along the esplanade
And high bluff of the river-fronting town,
To watch the boats and see the sun go down.

The lyric fit had left him; but the sight
Of the strong river sweeping vast and slow,
Gleaming far off, a flood of crimson light;
And, darkly hung between it and the glow
Of a most lovely sunset sky, the low,
Interminable forests of Arkansas,
Might have inspired some very pretty stanzas.

The esplanade looks down upon the landing,
A broadly shelving bank, well trodden and bare,
Called by a singular misunderstanding
The levee, —while there is no levee there;
The famous landing at New Orleans, where
There is one, having fixed the name forever
For that and other landings on the river.

Acres of merchandise, of cotton-bales,
And bales of hay, awaiting transportation;
Ploughs, household goods, and kegs of rum or nails,
Endless supplies for village and plantation,
Enclosed a scene of wondrous animation,
Of outcry and apparent wild confusion
Contrasting with the sunset’s soft illusion; —

The steamers lying broadside to the stream,
With delicately pillared decks, the clang
Of bells, the uproar of escaping steam;
There, tugging at some heavy rope, the gang
Of slaves that all together swayed and sang,
Their voices rising in a wild, rich chime,
To which lithe forms and litlie black arms kept time;

The shouts of negro-drivers, droves of mules,
Driven in their turn by madly yelling blacks;
Chairs, tables, kitchen-ware and farming-tools,
Carts, wagons, barrels, boxes, bales, and sacks,
Pushed, hauled, rolled, tumbled, tossed, or borne on backs
Of files of men, across the ways of plank
Between the loading steamers and the bank!

Then as the sunlight faded from the stream,
And deepening shadows cooled the upper air,
The waves were lighted by tlie lurid gleam
Of flambeaux that began to smoke and flare,
And cast a picturesque and ruddy glare
On shore and boats and men of every hue.

————————————————-

POEM:

Oh Tennessee, My Tennessee

by Naval Admiral William Porter Lawrence

Oh Tennessee, My Tennessee
What Love and Pride I Feel for Thee.
You Proud Ole State, the Volunteer,
Your Proud Traditions I Hold Dear.

I Revere Your Heroes
Who Bravely Fought our Country’s Foes.
Renowned Statesmen, so Wise and Strong,
Who Served our Country Well and Long.

I Thrill at Thought of Mountains Grand;
Rolling Green Hills and Fertile Farm Land;
Earth Rich with Stone, Mineral and Ore;
Forests Dense and Wild Flowers Galore;

Powerful Rivers that Bring us Light;
Deep Lakes with Fish and Fowl in Flight;
Thriving Cities and Industries;
Fine Schools and Universities;
Strong Folks of Pioneer Descent,
Simple, Honest, and Reverent.

Beauty and Hospitality
Are the Hallmarks of Tennessee.

And O’er the World as I May Roam,
No Place Exceeds my Boyhood Home.
And Oh How Much I Long to See
My Native Land, My Tennessee.

Oh Tennessee, My Tennessee was adopted as the official Tennessee state poem in 1973. Admiral William Lawrence composed this poem while enduring a 60 day period of solitary confinement in a North Vietnamese prisoner of war camp. Lawrence, a native of Nashville, Tennessee, spent a total of six years as a POW during the Vietnam War.

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CLARKSDALE, MISSISSIPPI

Clarksdale, the County seat of Coahoma County, was founded by John Clark in 1848 and was incorporated in 1882. Located on the banks of the Sunflower River, in the fertile alluvial plain called the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta, Clarksdale has long been the agricultural, commercial and cultural center for the North Delta. World renowned artists, musicians and writers claim Clarksdale as their home and inspiration. Clarksdale is the “Birthplace of the Blues” and is the location of the legendary Crossroads where Blues pioneer Robert Johnson purportedly sold his soul to the devil. The Delta Blues Museum is located in the historic railroad freight depot in the downtown. Clarksdale has several annual festivals: the Juke Joint Festival in April, the Delta Jubilee in June, the Sunflower River Blues and Gospel Festival in August and the Tennessee Williams Festival in September-October.

The crossroads where legend has it blues guitarist Robert Johnson sold his soul to the devil.

The crossroads where legend has it blues guitarist Robert Johnson sold his soul to the devil.

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THEO’S ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

Theo, a jovial Dutch transplant and blues fanatic, has on display an impressive personal collection of records, memorabilia, and artifacts that traces the roots of rock and roll from blues through the ’70s. His collection features all sorts of rare and interesting items (check out one of Muddy Waters’ riders) and if he’s not too busy, he’s all too enthusiastic to compliment the display with loads of fascinating historical rhetoric.The Rock and Blues Museum is the personal collection of Theo de Boogieman, (Theodore Dashbach), a Dutchman (and recently naturalized US Citizen) with a passion for music. The collection is an impressive collection of records, poster, instruments and ephemera spanning the 20th century. The main room is a chronology from the earliest recordings to the murder of John Lennon.THESE ARE PHOTOS FROM THE ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM
 ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

 ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

 ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

 ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

 ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

 ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

 ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

 ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

 ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

 ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

 ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI

 ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI THEO D "THE BOOGIEMAN" (THEODORE DASHBACH)

ROCK AND BLUES MUSEUM, CLARKSDALE, MISSISIPPI
THEO D “THE BOOGIEMAN”
(THEODORE DASHBACH)

_________________________________

GROUND ZERO BLUE CLUB,     CLARKSDALE, MISSISSIPPI

Ground Zero is a blues club in Clarksdale, Mississippi, that is co-owned by Morgan Freeman, attorney Bill Luckett, and Memphis entertainment executive Howard Stovall. It got its name from the fact that Clarksdale has been historically referred to as “Ground Zero” for the blues.It opened in May 2001and is located right next to the Delta Blues Museum. With its mismatched chairs and fraying sofa on the porch, it has a décor described as “manufactured authenticity.” Blues fans in Clarksdale welcome it as a place where local musicians have a chance to work regularly.

The menu consists of traditional southern foods, and the restaurant has live blues music playing Wednesday through Saturday. Super Chikan and Bill “Howl-n-Madd” Perry, not to be confused with the deceased Bill Perry, are two of the most frequent and well-known performers. In addition to the food and music, there are seven upstairs apartments that can be rented out to customers who would like to live the blues experience 24 hours a day.

GROUND ZERO BLUES CLUB, CLARKSDALE, MISSISSIPPI  -  OUTDOOR NEON SIGN

GROUND ZERO BLUES CLUB, CLARKSDALE, MISSISSIPPI – OUTDOOR NEON SIGN

GROUND ZERO BLUES CLUB

GROUND ZERO BLUES CLUB

GROUND ZERO BLUES CLUB

GROUND ZERO BLUES CLUB

GROUND ZERO BLUES CLUB

GROUND ZERO BLUES CLUB

GROUND ZERO BLUES CLUB

GROUND ZERO BLUES CLUB

______________________________________________

VICKSBURG, MISSISSIPPI

Vicksburg is the only city in Warren County, Mississippi. It is the sixteenth largest city in Mississippi.It is located 234 miles (377 km) northwest of New Orleans on the Mississippi and Yazoo rivers, and 40 miles (64 km) due west of Jackson, the state capital. In 1900, 14,834 people lived in Vicksburg; in 1910, 20,814; in 1920, 17,931; and in 1940, 24,460. The population was 26,407 at the 2000 census. In 2010, it became a Micropolitan with a population of 49,644. It is the county seat of Warren County.

Vicksburg is the principal city of the Vicksburg Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Warren County.

HISTORY OF VICKSBURG, MISSISSIPPI

The area which is now Vicksburg was previously part of the Natchez Native Americans‘ territory. The first Europeans who settled the area were French colonists, who built Fort-Saint-Pierre in 1719 on the high bluffs overlooking the Yazoo River at present-day Redwood. On 29 November 1729, the Natchez attacked the fort and plantations in and around the present-day city of Natchez, killing several hundred settlers, including the Jesuit Father Paul Du Poisson, and carrying off a number of women and children. The Natchez War was a disaster for French Louisiana as the colonial population of the Natchez District never recovered. However, with the help of the Choctaw, traditional enemies of the Natchez, the French defeated and scattered the Natchez and their allies, the Yazoo.

The Choctaw Nation took over the area by right of conquest and inhabited it for several decades. Under pressure from the US government, in 1801 the Choctaw agreed to cede nearly 2,000,000 acres (8,100 km2) of land to the US under the terms of the Treaty of Fort Adams. The treaty was the first of a series that eventually led to the removal of most of the Choctaw to Indian Territory west of the Mississippi River in 1830. Nonetheless, many Choctaw remained in Mississippi, citing article XIV of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek.

In 1790, the Spanish founded a military outpost on the site, which they called Fort Nogales (nogales meaning “walnut trees”). When the Americans took possession in 1798, they changed the name to Walnut Hills. The small village was incorporated in 1825 as Vicksburg, named after Newitt Vick, a Methodist minister who had established a mission on the site.

In 1835, during the Murrell Excitement, a mob from Vicksburg attempted to expel the gamblers from the city, because the citizens were sick of the rougher element treating the city with nothing but contempt. Five gamblers who had shot and killed a local doctor were hanged as a result.[4]

View of Vicksburg in 1855

During the American Civil War, the city finally had to surrender during the Siege of Vicksburg, after which the Union Army gained control of the entire Mississippi River. The 47-day siege was intended to starve the city into submission. Otherwise its location atop a high bluff overlooking the Mississippi River proved impregnable to assault by federal troops. The surrender of Vicksburg by Confederate General John C. Pemberton on July 4, 1863, together with the defeat of General Robert E. Lee at Gettysburg the day before, has historically marked the turning point in the Civil War. It has been claimed that the residents of Vicksburg did not celebrate the national holiday of 4th of July again until 1945 but this is inaccurate. Large Fourth of July celebrations were being held by 1907 and informal celebrations took place before that.[5][6]

Floating drydock in Vicksburg, circa 1905

Because of the city’s location on the Mississippi River, in the 19th century it built an extensive trade from the river’s prodigious steamboat traffic. Between 1881 and 1894, the Anchor Line, a prominent steamboat company on the Mississippi River from 1859 to 1898, operated a steamboat called the City of Vicksburg. In 1876 a Mississippi River flood cut off the large meander flowing past Vicksburg, leaving limited access to the new channel.

The United States Army Corps of Engineers diverted the Yazoo River in 1903 into the old, shallowing channel to rejuvenate the waterfront. Railroad access to the west was by transfer steamers and ferry barges until a combination railroad-highway bridge was built in 1929. This is the only Mississippi River rail crossing between Baton Rouge and Memphis. It is the only highway crossing between Natchez and Greenville.

Interstate 20 bridged the river after 1973. Freight rail traffic still crosses via the old bridge. North-South transportation links are by the Mississippi River and U.S. Highway 61.

The historic 1894 Mississippi River Commission Building

On March 12, 1894, the popular soft drink Coca-Cola was bottled for the first time in Vicksburg by Joseph A. Biedenharn, a local confectioner. Today, surviving nineteenth-century Biedenharn soda bottles are prized by collectors of Coca-Cola memorabilia. His original candy store has been renovated as the Biedenharn Coca-Cola Museum.

Vicksburg served as the primary refugee gathering point, and relief parties put up temporary housing during the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927. It submerged a large percentage of the Mississippi Delta. That flood was the impetus towards the US Army Corps of Engineers establishing the Waterways Experiment Station as the primary hydraulics laboratory, to develop protection of important croplands and cities from the river. Now known as the Engineer Research and Development Center, it applies military engineering, information technology, environmental engineering, hydraulic engineering, and geotechnical engineering.

In December 1953, a severe tornado swept across Vicksburg causing 38 deaths and destroying nearly 1,000 buildings. (Wikipedia)

WILLIAM JOHNSON HOUSE  VICKSBURG, MISSISSIPPI = National Humanities Center Resource Toolbox The Making of African American Identity: Vol. I, 1500-1865 New York Public Library Henry Lewis, Natchez, Mississippi , lithograph, mid 1850s * Diary of W illiam J ohnson Free Black Businessman Natchez, Mississippi Diary Selections from Jan. 1, 1838 – Jan. 1, 1844 Born a slave in 1809, William Tiler Johnson was freed in 1820 by his owner (most likely his father) who had earlier freed his mother and sister. He became an apprentice barber in the Mississippi River town of Natchez and in 1830 took over his brother-in-law’s barbershop. In 1835 he married Amy Battles, also a free person of color, with whom he had eleven children. In 1835 Johnson began a personal diary to record his daily activities and financial affairs. He operated several barber shops a nd a bathhouse, owned land and buildings which he rented out, and regularly loaned money at interest to black and white men alike. He was also a slaveowner, as were many other free blacks in the South. In 1851 Johnson was murdered in a land dispute. These diary entries span six years from 1838 to 1844, when Johnson was in his late twenties and early thirties. 1838 \ January 1, 1838 Buisness has been very Lively and a very greate Quantity of persons in town to day — Mr. Edward Thomas paid me to day fifty Dollars. It was a debt that Mr Marshall, the portraite Painter, Owed me for House rent and he gave me an Order on the Estate of Mr William Arllettes To day it was paid me by Mr. Arllette. Messrs Barlow & Taylor paid me To day One Hundred Dollars, money that I Loaned him a short time ago. They also paid me $15 that I Loaned them a good while ago — Mr John P. Smith Took Charge of the Mansion House, To night I Let all the Boys go to the theatre or Circus Mssrs : Messieurs, i.e., Sirs Boys : Johnson’s slaves and free blac k appren- tices Mc : Robert McCary, longtime friend, also a freed slave and barbe r . . . January 10, 1838 Auctions to day at Sprague & Howells and at Dolbeares 1 and at Sorias To day, the things belonging to the Estate of Mr. Sml Mason — I bot a pair [of] and Irons, tongs and poker, One spider 2 and one Oven The Concern only cost 1.50. Very Cheap — Dr Samuel Hogg paid me to day $19.50 for hi s shaving bill up to this date and I paid him Eleven dollars that I owed him for Medical Se rvices up to this date — $7 of the amount was for Mother . . . February 11, 1838 To day I went Out into the woods with my Gun and I Killed 10 Robbins, 2 Rice Birds, and 4 yellow Hammers, and I Only went Out at 1 Oclock. Mc went Out too, some w[h]ere in the nighboughhood of Minors pasture and Only Killed 4 Birds. Mr Armat Returns from Jackson and brings with him a Black Eye. He said it was hurt by a Dr Aiken or Hagan. The[y] had a small fight at the St ates House steps in Jackson. He sead that he Knocked the Fellow Down flat. Mr. Armatt paid me five Dollars to day on his acct. for hair cuting &c

WILLIAM JOHNSON HOUSE
VICKSBURG, MISSISSIPPI  –  Diary of
William
Johnson
Free Black Businessman
Natchez, Mississippi
Diary Selections from
Jan. 1, 1838 – Jan. 1, 1844
Born a slave in 1809, William Tiler Johnson was
freed in 1820 by his owner (most likely his father)
who had earlier freed his mother and sister. He
became an apprentice barber in the Mississippi
River town of Natchez and in 1830 took over his
brother-in-law’s barbershop. In 1835 he married
Amy Battles, also a free person of color, with
whom he had eleven children.
In 1835 Johnson began a personal diary to record his daily activities and financial affairs. He operated several barber shops and
a bathhouse, owned land and buildings which he rented out, and
regularly loaned money at interest to black and white men
alike. He was also a slaveowner, as were many other free blacks in the South. In 1851 Johnson was murdered in a land dispute.
These diary entries span six years from 1838 to 1844,
when Johnson was in his late twenties and early thirties.
1838
\
January 1, 1838
Buisness has been very Lively and a very greate Quantity of persons in
town to day — Mr. Edward Thomas paid me to day fifty Dollars. It was a debt that Mr
Marshall, the portraite Painter, Owed me for
House rent and he gave me an Order on the
Estate of Mr William Arllettes To day it was paid me by Mr. Arllette. Messrs Barlow &
Taylor paid me To day One Hundred Dollars, money that I Loaned him a short time ago.
They also paid me $15 that I Loaned them a good while ago — Mr John P. Smith Took
Charge of the Mansion House, To night I Let all the Boys go to the theatre or Circus
Mssrs
:
Messieurs,
i.e., Sirs
Boys
:
Johnson’s
slaves
and free
black
appren-tices
Mc
:
Robert
McCary,
longtime
friend, also
a freed
slave and
barber
. . .
January 10, 1838
Auctions to day at Sprague & Howells and at Dolbeares
1
and at Sorias
To day, the things belonging to the Estate of
Mr. Sml Mason — I bot a pair [of] and Irons,
tongs and poker, One spider
2
and one Oven The Concern only cost 1.50. Very Cheap —
Dr Samuel Hogg paid me to day $19.50 for hi
s shaving bill up to this
date and I paid him
Eleven dollars that I owed him for Medical Se
rvices up to this date — $7 of the amount was
for Mother
. . .
February 11, 1838
To day I went Out into the woods
with my Gun and I Killed 10 Robbins,
2 Rice Birds, and 4 yellow Hammers, and I Only went Out at 1 Oclock. Mc went Out too,
some w[h]ere in the nighboughhood of Minors
pasture and Only Killed 4 Birds. Mr Armat
Returns from Jackson and brings with him a Black Eye. He said it was hurt by a Dr Aiken
or Hagan. The[y] had a small fight at the St
ates House steps in Jackson. He sead that he
Knocked the Fellow Down flat. Mr. Armatt paid me five Dollars to day on his acct. for hair
cuting &c 

VICKSBURG, MISSISSIPPI  -   CORNER MEDICAL CENTER

VICKSBURG, MISSISSIPPI –
CORNER MEDICAL CENTER

VICKSBURG, MISSISSIPPI CONFEDERATE NAVAL GUN OVERLOOKING  THE MISSISSIPPI

VICKSBURG, MISSISSIPPI
CONFEDERATE NAVAL GUN OVERLOOKING THE MISSISSIPPI

VICKSBURG, MISSISSIPPI A SIGN OVERLOOKING THE MISSISSIPPI RVER

VICKSBURG, MISSISSIPPI
A SIGN OVERLOOKING THE MISSISSIPPI RVER

The Vicksburg Riverfront Murals project is a series of murals painted on Mississippi River flood walls in Vicksburg, MS. The murals are intended to depict the city’s historical significance, as well as its envisioned future role in the region’s commerce and culture.

VICKSBURG, MISSISSIPPI  LEVEEE STREET MURALS

VICKSBURG, MISSISSIPPI
LEVEEE STREET MURALS

VICKSBURG, MISSISSIPPI LEVEEE STREET MURALS

VICKSBURG, MISSISSIPPI
LEVEEE STREET MURALS

VICKSBURG, MISSISSIPPI LEVEEE STREET MURALS

VICKSBURG, MISSISSIPPI
LEVEEE STREET MURALS

Catfish Row Children's Art Park

Catfish Row Children’s Art Park

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CATFISH ROW CHILDREN’S ART PARK   –  CHILDREN’S ART

Catfish Row Children's Art Park

Catfish Row Children’s Art Park

Catfish Row Children's Art Park

Catfish Row Children’s Art Park

Catfish Row Children's Art Park

Catfish Row Children’s Art Park

Catfish Row Children's Art Park

Catfish Row Children’s Art Park

Catfish Row Children's Art Park

Catfish Row Children’s Art Park

Catfish Row Children's Art Park

Catfish Row Children’s Art Park

Catfish Row Children's Art Park

Catfish Row Children’s Art Park

Catfish Row Children's Art Park

Catfish Row Children’s Art Park

Catfish Row Children's Art Park

Catfish Row Children’s Art Park

Catfish Row Children's Art Park

Catfish Row Children’s Art Park

Catfish Row Children's Art Park

Catfish Row Children’s Art Park

NATCHEZ, MISSISSIPPI

Established first as a French fort site overlooking the Mississippi River in 1716, then laid out as a new town by the Spanish in the 1790s, Natchez became part of the United States with the establishment of the Mississippi Territory in 1798 and served as the first capital for the new State of Mississippi in 1817.

Mild climate and rich soil brought planters to the area, who made their fortunes in cotton and slaves and built one of the South’s most charming cities. A place resplendent with natural beauty, Natchez is perched over 200 feet above the Mississippi River, with 30-mile views along the river both north and south. Today, it’s a thriving location for Mississippi tourism.

Because Natchez did not hold a strategic position during the Civil War, it was spared much of the damage other cities suffered and remains home to more than 600 examples of antebellum architecture — more than any other city in the South. These homes and buildings, along with historic churches and other heritage sites, make Natchez a treasure trove for  history buffs.

Of course, it is also the namesake for the Natchez Trace, the centuries-old, 444-mile path from Natchez to Nashville, long used by American Indians before becoming a U.S. thoroughfare. Today the Natchez Trace Parkway  provides beautiful picnic areas, the rare Emerald Mound burial ground, and the historic Mount Locust Inn, all just a few minutes’ drive from downtown Natchez.

History of Natchez

Natchez, the birthplace of Mississippi, is known internationally as a quaint, Southern town with a rich culture and heritage shaped by people of African, French, British and Spanish descent. It’s first inhabitants, however, were the Natchez Indians and it was French explorers who first came to the area and made it their home in peace with the tribe.

Shortly after French settlers joined the Natchez Indians on a bluff overlooking the Mississippi River, they brought people from western Africa as slaves to provide labor for development. These members of the Bambara tribe — whose name means “those who accept no master” — were the first Africans in what would become the State of Mississippi. Known for their abilities to cultivate the earth, the Bambarans contributed greatly to the economic growth of the region and the nation.

As the settlement grew, French, English and Spanish residents began constructing homes and buildings in the styles with which they were familiar, leaving several architectural influences and creating the unique backdrop to the city with which residents and visitors enjoy today.

NATCHEZ, MISSISSIPPI A SIGN ABOUT NATCHEZ

NATCHEZ, MISSISSIPPI
A SIGN ABOUT NATCHEZ

NATCHEZ, MISSISSIPPI GOSPEL CHURCH

NATCHEZ, MISSISSIPPI
GOSPEL CHURCH

Natchez, Mississippi Antebellum Mansion

Natchez, Mississippi
Antebellum Mansion

Natchez, Mississippi Antebellum Mansion

Natchez, Mississippi
Antebellum Mansion

NATCHEZ,  MISSISSIPPI  -  A VIEW OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER

NATCHEZ, MISSISSIPPI –
A VIEW OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER

NATCHEZ, MISSISSIPPI A SIGN AT THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER

NATCHEZ, MISSISSIPPI
A SIGN AT THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER

NATCHEZ, MISSISSIPPI  - HISTORICAL  SIGN

NATCHEZ, MISSISSIPPI – HISTORICAL SIGN

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BRANDON HALL

Brandon Hall is a Greek Revival architecture style house built in 1856 in Washington, Mississippi, USA. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.

HISTORYMajestic Brandon Hall was formally a large working cotton plantation located on the scenic Natchez Trace. The land on which Brandon Hall now stands first passed into private ownership as a royal grant from the Spanish King Carlos III in 1788. In 1809 the property was sold at public auction to William Lock Chew for the sum of $7,000. Chew constructed the first permanent dwelling consisting of a three room brick house about twenty by sixty feet, built sometime between 1809 and 1820. This structure still exists as the “basement” of the present house known as Brandon Hall.

In 1833 Chew sold the property to Nathaniel Hoggatt, a successful planter whose daughter Charlotte inherited the land after his death. On October 29, 1840, Charlotte Hoggatt married Gerard Brandon III, who was the son of an early Governor of Mississippi and the grandson of a Revolutionary War Hero of the same name. They lived in this original dwelling until 1853, when they began construction of Brandon Hall which was completed in 1856.

In January 1914, the plantation, house, and land was sold to George Hightower as a result of a default on a promissory note, thus ending an 81 year chain of ownership by the Brandon and Hoggatt families. These 81 years extended from Mississippi’s frontier days during the period of grace and plenty before the Civil War, and through the South’s darkest hours after the war.

From 1914 until the present, Brandon Hall Plantation has had ten owners. In 1987 the home was completely renovated and restored, perfectly duplicating the original construction.

In 2009 the owners of the house, Edward L. and James R. Diefenthal of New Orleans, Louisiana, donated the house to the Historic Natchez Foundation.

In December 2009 the home was purchased by Ron and Kathy Garber of Lafayette, Louisiana, who opened it for Bed and Breakfast accommodation.

BRANDON HALL

BRANDON HALL

BRANDON HALL  (SIDE VIEW)

BRANDON HALL (SIDE VIEW)

BRANDON HALL - ENTRANCE FOYER

BRANDON HALL – ENTRANCE FOYER

BRANDON HALL GUIDES IN PERIOD COSTUMES

BRANDON HALL
GUIDES IN PERIOD COSTUMES

BRANDON HALL -  GUIDES IN PERIOD COSTUMES IN THE SITTING ROOM

BRANDON HALL – GUIDES IN PERIOD COSTUMES IN THE SITTING ROOM

BRANDON HALL  -   SITTING ROOM

BRANDON HALL – SITTING ROOM

BRANDON HALL  -  SITTING ROOM (SIDE VIEW)

BRANDON HALL – SITTING ROOM (SIDE VIEW)

BRANDON  HALL  -  LIVING ROOM

BRANDON HALL – LIVING ROOM

BRANDON HALL  -  DINING ROOM ACE THE TABLE IS A PUKAH . (Pukah  - The pukah, coming to Natchez by way of the West Indies, is a large fan, often of wood, hanging over the dining room table for shooing away insects and for cooling purposes).

BRANDON HALL – DINING ROOM ACE THE TABLE IS A PUKAH .
(Pukah –
The pukah, coming to Natchez by way of the West Indies, is a large fan, often of wood, hanging over the dining room table for shooing away insects and for cooling purposes).

BRANDON HALL -  THE FINEST DINNERWARE WAS IMPORTED FROM FRANCE AND USED

BRANDON HALL – THE FINEST DINNERWARE WAS IMPORTED FROM FRANCE AND USED

BRANDON HALL  -THE MUSIC ROOM

BRANDON HALL -THE MUSIC ROOM

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THE ANGOLA PRISON RODEO

ANGOLA RODEO  –  LOUISIANA STATE PENITENTIARY

The Angola Prison Rodeo, staged at the Louisiana State Penitentiary , is the longest running prison rodeo in the United States.

It is held on one weekend in April and on every Sunday in October. On each occasion, thousands of visitors enter the prison complex.Various prisoner organizations sell food at concession stands. Many of the prisoners use family  recipes to craft the concession stand food. Prison guards conduct the financial transactions at the Angola Rodeo.

As part of the prison rodeo,there is an Arts and Crafts Festival that is biannual. Prisoners make handmade work. Melissa Schrift, author of “Angola Prison Art: Captivity, Creativity, and Consumerism”, wrote that “In addition to introducing innovations into vernacular prison art forms, Angola inmates find enormous value in creating works that embody or mimic the everyday images and goods so readily available in the outside world.

The rodeo raises funds for religious educational programs for prisoners. As of 2013 each spring rodeo raises $450,000.The rodeo’s slogan is “the wildest show in the South.

 

The idea of the rodeo was born in 1964.The Rodeo, a collaboration between prisoners and employees, began in 1965. Cathy Fontenot, the Assistant Warden, said that originally prisoners and staff backed pickup trucks into a field and “and would go out there and play around on horses.” In 1967 LSP opened the Rodeo to outside spectators. As time passed, LSP erected bleachers and adopted the rules of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association. In addition the administration added an Arts and Crafts festival, and added stock animals and rodeo clowns. The current 10,000-person stadium opened in 2000.

Started in 1964, the Angola Prison Rodeo began as a recreational activity for the inmates and officers, and originally was closed to the public. A few years later, people began to flock to the rodeo and watch from apple crates or car hoods outside of the fence. When its popularity grew, the prison took notice of the economic opportunity and began selling tickets and building seating for the spectators. The Rodeo is still in operation today, 50 years later, the oldest operating prison rodeo in  America.

ANGOLA PRISON RODEO SEEN FROM THE STANDS

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LOUISIANA STATE PENITENTIARY MUSEUM

HISTORY OF THE PRISON

Prior to 1835, inmates were housed in a vermin infested jail in New Orleans.  In that year the first Louisiana State Penitentiary was built at the corner of 6th and Laurel Streets in Baton Rouge using a plan similar to a prison in Wethersfield, Connecticut.  In 1844, the penitentiary, including the inmates, was leased to the private firm of McHatton Pratt and Company.  Union Troops occupied the penitentiary during the Civil War, and in 1869 the lease was awarded to a Confederate Major by the name of Samuel James. The James Family would be in charge of the Louisiana Corrections system for the next 31 years.

In 1880, Major James purchased an 8,000-acre plantation in West Feliciana Parish called Angola (named after the area in Africa where the former slaves came from).  He began keeping some inmates there at what used to be the Old Slave Quarters, which later became Camp A.  (Camp A is no longer used to house inmates.)  Primarily, however, inmates worked on levee construction on the Mississippi River outside either Angola or the penitentiary in Baton Rouge.  In 1894, Major James died and his son took over the lease.  However, the 1890′s were years of reform and the public was shocked by newspaper accounts of brutality inflicted upon inmates.  On January 1, 1901, the State of Louisiana resumed control of all inmates after 55 years of the lease system.

From 1901 until 1916, Corrections was operated by the Board of Control, a three member panel appointed by the Governor of Louisiana.  One of the first things the board did was to purchase the 8,000 acre Angola Plantation at $25.00 per acre, a total cost of $200,000.  New camps were built and many new security officers were hired.  Brutality toward inmates was stopped and the death rate among inmates was reduced by 72%.  However, the floods of 1903 and 1912 ruined the crops and put Angola in economic chaos.

In 1916, the legislature abolished the Board of Control and appointed Henry L. Fuqua as General Manager of the penitentiary.  Mr. Fuqua, as an economic measure, fired almost all of the security officers at Angola and in their place put selected inmate trusty guards.  In 1918, the old penitentiary in Baton Rouge was sold to the city and was soon torn down.  In addition, he did away with convict stripes (the old black and white uniforms).  In 1922, another flood at Angola ruined not only the crops at Angola, but also the crops of adjoining plantations.  This was the third time in 20 years and the owners were ready to sell.  In a series of eight purchases in a year and a half, Henry Fuqua purchased 10,000 acres of land at approximately $13.00 per acre.  This brought Angola to its present size of 18,000 acres.

The era of Huey P. Long and the Great Depression were hard times, not only for the state, but for Corrections as well.  The budget was drastically reduced, convict stripes were returned and Angola generally fell into disrepair.  Angola was all but forgotten while the state concerned itself with the depression and World War II.

In 1952 a Minden, Louisiana, Judge by the name of Robert Kennon based his campaign for governor on the need to clean up Angola.  This had been brought to light when 31 inmates cut their Achilles’ tendon as protest to the hard work and brutality.  After the election, Governor Kennon made good on his campaign promises.  The Main Prison Complex was completed in 1955, convict stripes were eliminated for the last time, and renovations were completed on various camps.  Women inmates were first moved to a new camp on Angola, and then in 1961, they were moved away from Angola to St. Gabriel, Louisiana.  This was a period of massive reform.

In 1961, the Corrections’ budget was drastically reduced and a period of decline began.  During the late 1960′s, Angola became known as “The Bloodiest Prison in the South” due to the number of inmate assaults.

After his election in 1972, Governor Edwin Edwards appointed Elayn Hunt as Director of Corrections.  She had long been known as an advocate for prison reform.  Under her direction, massive reform began.  Judge E. Gordon West issued a court order which demanded that Angola’s conditions be improved.  Mrs. Hunt eliminated the hated “Trusty Guard System” and the number of security guards nearly quadrupled over the next eight years.  Mrs. Hunt died in February 1976, but her work continued through her assistant C. Paul Phelps, who was named Secretary of the Department of Corrections in 1976.  Four new camps were constructed and major renovations were completed on others.  For the first time, meaningful rehabilitative efforts were made and medical care was improved.

Under the administration of the Secretary of the Louisiana Department of Public Safety and Corrections, James LeBlanc, Angola’s improvements continue today.  In January 1994, Angola achieved initial accreditation from the American Correctional Association (ACA) and has since maintained ACA accreditation.  Accreditation is a recognized credential in identifying an entity as stable, safe and constitutional.  ACA accreditation forms the foundation of operations at Angola and is a continuing catalyst for positive growth and change.  After initial ACA accreditation, Angola then began to build upon this operational foundation through independent  ACA accreditation of its training academy and health care program.  This required Angola to not only meet the national standards for adult correctional institutions, but also the additional standards developed specifically for correctional training academies and performance-based health care standards for adult institutions.  Both bids for independent accreditation were successful.  The David C. Knapps Correctional Officer Training Academy received initial accreditation in January 2002, becoming the eighth accredited correctional training facility in the United States.  The R. E. Barrow, Jr., Treatment Center received initial accreditation through performance-based health care standards in January 2003.

Secretary Stalder and Angola’s current Warden, Burl Cain, continue the pursuit of physical plant improvements, as evidenced by the renovations of Cellblocks A and B at the Main Prison, Jaguar Cellblock at Camp C, and Raven Cellblock at Camp D.  New construction includes the multi-purpose arena, Camp D chapel, and the Judge Henry A. Politz Education Building at the Main Prison.  Numerous other service and program enhancements are ongoing under the leadership of Warden Cain.

Louisiana citizens also have the unique opportunity to actually “visit” Angola’s past by stopping by the Angola Museum.  The museum, which was established in 1998 by Warden Cain, is dedicated to preserving Angola’s history.  The museum has become an official tourist site in the parish and serves as a resource for information on the state’s correctional system.

LOUISIANA STATE PENITENTIARY ENTRANCE

LOUISIANA STATE PENITENTIARY MUSEUM

LOUISIANA STATE PENITENTIARY MUSEUM

LOUISIANA STATE PENITENTIARY MUSEUM  -   This is an actual bull used in the “Guts & Glory” event for 11 years. He was 15, weighed over 1850 pounds and is now displayed in the museum as part of rodeo history. Read more at http://thecelebritycafe.com/feature/guts-and-glory-angola-10-11-2011#5deQlcXWLYqu5jRa.99

LOUISIANA STATE PENITENTIARY MUSEUM  -  PRISON CELL

LOUISIANA STATE PENITENTIARY MUSEUM  -  PHOTO OF PRISON CELL BLOCK

 
   
LAFAYETTE, LOUISIANA  

Lafayette is a city located along the Vermilion River in southwestern Louisiana. The city of Lafayette is the fourth-largest in the state, with a population of 120,623 at the 2010 census. The combined statistical area of Lafayette–Opelousas-Morgan City was 611,774 according to 2012 estimates.Lafayette is the parish seat of Lafayette Parish, Louisiana

It was founded as Vermilionville in 1821 by a French-speaking Acadian named Jean Mouton. In 1884, it was renamed for General Gilbert du Motier, marquis de Lafayette, a French military hero who fought with and significantly aided the American Army during the American Revolutionary War. The city’s economy was primarily based on agriculture until the 1940s, when the petroleum and natural gas industries became dominant. In recent years, the medical profession has taken a more predominant role in the area economy.

Lafayette is the center of Cajun culture in Louisiana and the United States. The city has a strong tourism industry because of the Cajun culture there and in the surrounding region. There is also a Creole influence in the area, although most Creoles and their descendants originate to the east in New Orleans. The Creole and Cajun cuisines are among the most famous regional cuisines of the United States.

LAFAYETTE, LOUISIANA  -  PREJEAN'S RESTAURANT  -  FAMED FOR CAJUN FOOD AND MUSIC

 
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NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA

   

Situated on a bend of the Mississippi River 100 miles from its mouth, New Orleans has been the chief city of Louisiana and the Gulf of Mexico’s busiest northern port since the early 1700s. Founded by the French, ruled for 40 years by the Spanish and bought by the United States in the 1803 Louisiana Purchase, New Orleans is known for its distinct Creole culture and vibrant history. Significant battles of the War of 1812 and the Civil War were fought over the city. In its last hundred years the key struggles of New Orleans have been social (poverty, racial strife) and natural (hurricanes, floods and slowly sinking land).

France and the founding of New Orleans

The first known residents of the New Orleans area were the Native Americans of the Woodland and Mississippian cultures. The expeditions of De Soto (1542) and La Salle (1682) passed through the area, but there were few permanent white settlers before 1718, when the governor of French Louisiana, Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville, founded the city of Nouvelle-Orléans on the first crescent of high ground above the Mississippi’s mouth. In 1722 he transferred Louisiana’s capital from Biloxi. The same year a hurricane destroyed most of the new city, which was rebuilt in the grid pattern of today’s French Quarter.

New Orleans under Spanish rule and Louisiane Purchase

In 1762 and 1763 France signed treaties ceding Louisiana to Spain. For 40 years New Orleans was a Spanish city, trading heavily with Cuba and Mexico and adopting the Spanish racial rules that allowed for a class of free people of color. The city was ravaged by fires in 1788 and 1794 and rebuilt in brick with buildings and a cathedral that still stand today.

In 1803 Louisiana reverted to the French, who sold it to the United States 20 days later in the Louisiana Purchase. The final battle of the War of 1812 was fought in defense of New Orleans; Colonel Andrew Jackson led a coalition of pirates, free blacks and Tennessee Volunteers to defeat a British force outside the city.

New Orleans in the 1880′s

During the first half of the 19th century, New Orleans became the United States’ wealthiest and third-largest city. Its port shipped the produce of much of the nation’s interior to the Caribbean, South America and Europe. Thousands of slaves were sold in its markets, but its free black community thrived. Until 1830, the majority of its residents still spoke French.

At the start of the Civil War, New Orleans was the largest city in the Confederacy, but it was only a year until Union troops, having captured its downriver defenses, took the city unopposed. During the Reconstruction era race became a potent political force, as emancipated slaves and free people of color were brought into the political process and, with the 1870s rise of the White League and the Ku Klux Klan, forced back out of it. Although the rise of railroads made shipping on the Mississippi less essential than it had been, New Orleans remained a powerful and influential port.

New Orleans in the twentieth Century

By 1900, the city’s streetcars were electrified, and New Orleans jazz was born in its clubs and dance halls. The city grew. New pump technology drove the ambitious draining of the low-lying swampland located between the city’s riverside crescent and Lake Pontchartrain. New levees and drainage canals meant that many residents could live below sea level. Hurricanes in 1909, 1915, 1947 and 1965 damaged the city, but never catastrophically.

After World War II, suburbanization and conflicts over school integration drew many white residents out of the city, leaving a core that was increasingly African-American and impoverished. Despite these social changes, the city grew as a tourist attraction, with hundreds of thousands of annual visitors drawn to its Mardi Gras festivities and to the culture that had inspired playwright Tennessee Williams, trumpeter Louis Armstrong and chef Jean Galatoire.

New Orleans and Hurricane Katrina

On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina struck a haphazardly evacuated New Orleans. The Category 5 storm’s winds tore away roofs and drove a storm surge that breached four levees, flooding 80 percent of the city. Hundreds were killed in the flooding and thousands were trapped for days in harsh circumstances before state and federal rescuers could reach them.

The waters receded, but a year later only half the city’s residents had returned. Within five years 80 percent were back, but New Orleans—though as diverse, unique and historic as ever—remained far from reclaiming its 1930s nickname, “the city that care forgot.”

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GARDEN DISTRICT, NEW ORLEANS

The Garden District is a neighborhood of the city of New Orleans. A subdistrict of the Central City/Garden District Area, its boundaries as defined by the City Planning Commission are: St. Charles Avenue to the north, 1st Street to the east, Magazine Street to the south and Toledano Street to the west. The National Historic Landmark district extends a little further.The area was originally developed between 1832 and 1900 and is considered one of the best-preserved collections of historic southern mansions in the United States. The 19th-century origins of the Garden District illustrate wealthy newcomers building opulent structures based upon the prosperity of New Orleans in that era.

HISTORY

This whole area was once a number of plantations, including the Livaudais Plantation. It was sold off in parcels to mainly wealthy Americans who did not want to live in the French Quarter with the Creoles. It became a part of the city of Lafayette in 1833, and was annexed by New Orleans in 1852. The district was laid out by New Orleans architect, planner and surveyor Barthelemy Lafon.

Originally the area was developed with only a couple of houses per block, each surrounded by a large garden, giving the district its name. In the late 19th century some of these large lots were subdivided as Uptown New Orleans became more urban. This has produced a pattern for much of the neighborhood of any given block having a couple of early 19th-century mansions surrounded by “gingerbread” decorated late Victorian houses. Thus the “Garden District” is now known for its architecture more than gardens per se.

A slightly larger district (one block further west to Louisiana, one block farther north to Carondelet and three blocks farther east to Josephine) was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1974

ST. VINCENTS GUEST HOUSE  -  St. Vincent’s was built in 1861 as an orphanage.  It was founded by the Daughter’s of Charity order of nuns, however much of the funding was provided by Margaret Haughery.  She was an extraordinary woman - an illiterate, Irish immigrant who, from nothing, built a thriving bakery business and became New Orleans’ foremost philanthropist.  She lost her own child and husband to yellow fever, which was endemic in New Orleans.   Mosquito born diseases killed thousands every summer until the early 1900’s when the link between mosquitos and disease became understood and public works were undertaken to reduce mosquito breeding grounds.  Orphanages were much needed in this environment and St. Vincent’s and St. Elizabeth’s on Napoleon Ave, harbored orphans and later unwed mothers and children until the 1970’s.  Peter Schreiber and Sally Leonard rescued the near derelict building in 1994 and with much love and dedication, have remodelled it to become the unique guest house you enjoy today.

ST. VINCENTS GUEST HOUSE – St. Vincent’s was built in 1861 as an orphanage. It was founded by the Daughter’s of Charity order of nuns, however much of the funding was provided by Margaret Haughery. She was an extraordinary woman – an illiterate, Irish immigrant who, from nothing, built a thriving bakery business and became New Orleans’ foremost philanthropist. She lost her own child and husband to yellow fever, which was endemic in New Orleans. Mosquito born diseases killed thousands every summer until the early 1900’s when the link between mosquitos and disease became understood and public works were undertaken to reduce mosquito breeding grounds. Orphanages were much needed in this environment and St. Vincent’s and St. Elizabeth’s on Napoleon Ave, harbored orphans and later unwed mothers and children until the 1970’s.
Peter Schreiber and Sally Leonard rescued the near derelict building in 1994 and with much love and dedication, have remodelled it to become the unique guest house you enjoy today.

LAFAYETTE CEMETARY  NO. 1  -   Lafayette Cemetery is one of the oldest cemeteries in the city.The history of the cemetery goes back to the beginning of the 19th century, before it was part of New Orleans. History and the Yellow Fever: Built in what was once the City of Lafayette, the cemetery was officially established in 1833. The area was formerly part of the Livaudais plantation, and that square had been used for burials since 1824. The cemetery was laid out by Benjamin Buisson, and consisted of two intersecting roads that divide the property into four quadrants. In 1852, New Orleans annexed the City of Lafayette, and the graveyard became the city cemetery, the first planned cemetery in New Orleans. The first available burial records are dated from August 3, 1843, although the cemetery had been in use prior to that date. In 1841, there were 241 burials in Lafayette of victims of yellow fever. In 1847, approximately 3000 people died of yellow fever, and Lafayette holds about 613 of those. By 1853, the worst outbreak ever caused more than 8000 deaths, and bodies were often left at the gates of Lafayette. Many of these victims were immigrants and flatboatman, who worked in the area on the Mississippi. The cemetery fell on hard times, and many of the tombs were vandalized, or fell into ruin. Thanks to the hard work of the organization "Save Our Cemeteries," there have been extensive restoration and preservation efforts, and Lafayette is open for tours.  Tombs: Wall vaults, or "ovens" line the perimeter of the cemetery here, as in St. Roch and the St. Louis properties. Notable tombs here are the Smith & Dumestre family tomb, in Section 2, with 37 names carved on it, with dates ranging from 1861 to 1997. Many tombs list such various causes of death as yellow fever, apoplexy, and being struck by lightning. Also depicted are veterans of various wars, including the Civil War and a member of the French Foreign Legion. Eight tombs list ladies as "consorts." Several distinctive monuments are for the deceased of "Woodman of the World," an insurance company still in existence which offered a "monument benefit." Brigadier General Harry T. Hays of the Confederate Army is buried here, in an area featuring a broken column. The Brunies family, of jazz fame, has a tomb here. The Lafayette Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1, the Chalmette Fire Co. No. 32, and the Jefferson Fire Company No. 22, all have group tombs here. The "Secret Garden" is a square of four tombs built by friends, "the Quarto," who wished to be buried together. According to Save Our Cemeteries, the Quarto held secret meetings, but the last member destroyed their book of notes. The only evidence of their existence are two keys from their minutes, which have been made into broaches and belong to their descendants.

LAFAYETTE CEMETARY NO. 1 – Lafayette Cemetery is one of the oldest cemeteries in the city.The history of the cemetery goes back to the beginning of the 19th century, before it was part of New Orleans.
History and the Yellow Fever:
Built in what was once the City of Lafayette, the cemetery was officially established in 1833. The area was formerly part of the Livaudais plantation, and that square had been used for burials since 1824. The cemetery was laid out by Benjamin Buisson, and consisted of two intersecting roads that divide the property into four quadrants. In 1852, New Orleans annexed the City of Lafayette, and the graveyard became the city cemetery, the first planned cemetery in New Orleans.
The first available burial records are dated from August 3, 1843, although the cemetery had been in use prior to that date. In 1841, there were 241 burials in Lafayette of victims of yellow fever. In 1847, approximately 3000 people died of yellow fever, and Lafayette holds about 613 of those. By 1853, the worst outbreak ever caused more than 8000 deaths, and bodies were often left at the gates of Lafayette. Many of these victims were immigrants and flatboatman, who worked in the area on the Mississippi.
The cemetery fell on hard times, and many of the tombs were vandalized, or fell into ruin. Thanks to the hard work of the organization “Save Our Cemeteries,” there have been extensive restoration and preservation efforts, and Lafayette is open for tours.
Tombs:
Wall vaults, or “ovens” line the perimeter of the cemetery here, as in St. Roch and the St. Louis properties. Notable tombs here are the Smith & Dumestre family tomb, in Section 2, with 37 names carved on it, with dates ranging from 1861 to 1997. Many tombs list such various causes of death as yellow fever, apoplexy, and being struck by lightning. Also depicted are veterans of various wars, including the Civil War and a member of the French Foreign Legion. Eight tombs list ladies as “consorts.”
Several distinctive monuments are for the deceased of “Woodman of the World,” an insurance company still in existence which offered a “monument benefit.” Brigadier General Harry T. Hays of the Confederate Army is buried here, in an area featuring a broken column. The Brunies family, of jazz fame, has a tomb here. The Lafayette Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1, the Chalmette Fire Co. No. 32, and the Jefferson Fire Company No. 22, all have group tombs here. The “Secret Garden” is a square of four tombs built by friends, “the Quarto,” who wished to be buried together. According to Save Our Cemeteries, the Quarto held secret meetings, but the last member destroyed their book of notes. The only evidence of their existence are two keys from their minutes, which have been made into broaches and belong to their descendants.

GARDEN DISTRICT - DAVIS HOUSE (FRONT VIEW)

GARDEN DISTRICT – DAVIS HOUSE (FRONT VIEW)

GARDEN DISTRICT, NEW ORLEANS - DAVIS HOUSE (SIDE VIEW)

GARDEN DISTRICT, NEW ORLEANS – DAVIS HOUSE
(SIDE VIEW)

GARDEN DISTRICT -  NEW ORLEANS PLAQUE IN FRONT DAVIS HOUSE

GARDEN DISTRICT – NEW ORLEANS PLAQUE IN FRONT DAVIS HOUSE

GARDEN DISTRICT, NEW ORLEANS

GARDEN DISTRICT, NEW ORLEANS

GARDEN DISTRICT, NEW ORLEANS

GARDEN DISTRICT, NEW ORLEANS

GARDEN DISTRICT, NEW ORLEANS

GARDEN DISTRICT, NEW ORLEANS

GARDEN DISTRICT, NEW ORLEANS

GARDEN DISTRICT, NEW ORLEANS

GARDEN DISTRICT, NEW ORLEANS

GARDEN DISTRICT, NEW ORLEANS

GARDEN DISTRICT, NEW ORLEANS

GARDEN DISTRICT, NEW ORLEANS

GARDEN DISTRICT, NEW ORLEANS

GARDEN DISTRICT, NEW ORLEANS

GARDEN DISTRICT, NEW ORLEANS – SANDRA BULLOCK HOUSE

GARDEN DISTRICT, NEW ORLEANS  -  COMMANDER PALACE RESTAURANT  -   Commander's Palace was established in 1880, and is located in the Garden District of Uptown New Orleans (1403 Washington Ave, New Orleans, 70130). Owned by the Brennan family, it has long been one of the best regarded upscale restaurants in the city. Paul Prudhomme and Emeril Lagasse are two of its alumni. Commander's Palace has received a four-diamond rating by the American Automobile Association. It was ranked the most famous restaurant in New Orleans. In 1880, Emile Commander established a small saloon at the corner of Washington Avenue and Coliseum Street. Within a few years he turned it into a restaurant patronized by the distinguished neighborhood families of the Garden District. By 1900 Commander's Palace was attracting gourmets from all over the world. In the 1920s, Frank G. Giarratano was the owner of the restaurant. He lived above the restaurant with his wife, Rose and their two sons. There were rumors that there were private dining rooms upstairs rented to riverboat captains, visitors, etc. The upstairs rooms were the private residence of Mr. Giarratano and his family. while the downstairs with a separate entrance remained a family establishment. Fearing that the restaurant business would decline from what it had been during World War II, and being in declining health, Giarratano sold the restaurant to Frank and Elinor Moran after the war ended. In 1944, Frank and Elinor Moran bought Commander's Palace, refurbished it and carried on its tradition of excellence with an expanded menu including many recipes still used. Thirty years later, when the Brennans took over, they redesigned the interior to complement the outdoor setting. Large windows replaced walls, and custom trellises and paintings were commissioned. The restaurant suffered extensive damage due to Hurricane Katrina in 2005. After a full renovation, the restaurant re-opened on October 1, 2006. In 2001, a second Commander's Palace restaurant was opened in the Desert Passage mall adjacent to the Aladdin, Las Vegas casino (It subsequently closed a few years later). A new Commander's Palace restaurant in Destin, Florida opened July 9, 2008, and closed in 2010.

GARDEN DISTRICT, NEW ORLEANS – COMMANDER PALACE RESTAURANT –
Commander’s Palace was established in 1880, and is located in the Garden District of Uptown New Orleans (1403 Washington Ave, New Orleans, 70130). Owned by the Brennan family, it has long been one of the best regarded upscale restaurants in the city. Paul Prudhomme and Emeril Lagasse are two of its alumni. Commander’s Palace has received a four-diamond rating by the American Automobile Association. It was ranked the most famous restaurant in New Orleans.
In 1880, Emile Commander established a small saloon at the corner of Washington Avenue and Coliseum Street. Within a few years he turned it into a restaurant patronized by the distinguished neighborhood families of the Garden District. By 1900 Commander’s Palace was attracting gourmets from all over the world.
In the 1920s, Frank G. Giarratano was the owner of the restaurant. He lived above the restaurant with his wife, Rose and their two sons. There were rumors that there were private dining rooms upstairs rented to riverboat captains, visitors, etc. The upstairs rooms were the private residence of Mr. Giarratano and his family. while the downstairs with a separate entrance remained a family establishment. Fearing that the restaurant business would decline from what it had been during World War II, and being in declining health, Giarratano sold the restaurant to Frank and Elinor Moran after the war ended.
In 1944, Frank and Elinor Moran bought Commander’s Palace, refurbished it and carried on its tradition of excellence with an expanded menu including many recipes still used.
Thirty years later, when the Brennans took over, they redesigned the interior to complement the outdoor setting. Large windows replaced walls, and custom trellises and paintings were commissioned.
The restaurant suffered extensive damage due to Hurricane Katrina in 2005. After a full renovation, the restaurant re-opened on October 1, 2006.
In 2001, a second Commander’s Palace restaurant was opened in the Desert Passage mall adjacent to the Aladdin, Las Vegas casino (It subsequently closed a few years later). A new Commander’s Palace restaurant in Destin, Florida opened July 9, 2008, and closed in 2010.

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FRENCH QUARTER, NEW ORLEANS

The French Quarter, also known as the Vieux Carré, is the oldest neighborhood in the city of New Orleans. When New Orleans (La Nouvelle-Orléans in French) was founded in 1718 by Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville, the city was originally centered on the French Quarter, or the Vieux Carré (“Old Square” in French) as it was known then. While the area is still referred to as the Vieux Carré by some, it is more commonly known as the French Quarter today, or simply “The Quarter.”[1] Although called the “French” Quarter, most of the present day buildings were built under Spanish rule and show Spanish colonial tastes. The district as a whole is a National Historic Landmark, and contains numerous individual historic buildings. It was affected relatively lightly by Hurricane Katrina in 2005, as compared to other areas of the city and the greater region.
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BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS

Bourbon Street (French: Rue des Bourbon) is a street in the heart of New Orleans’ oldest neighborhood, the French Quarter in New Orleans, Louisiana. It extends 13 blocks from Canal Street to Esplanade Avenue.While it is now primarily known for its bars and strip clubs, Bourbon Street’s history provides a rich insight into New Orleans’ past.

history

The French claimed Louisiana as a colony in the 1690s. Jean Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville was appointed as Director General in charge of developing a colony in the territory. He founded New Orleans in 1718. In 1721, the royal engineer, Adrien de Pauger designed the city’s street layout. He named the streets after French royal houses and Catholic saints. Bourbon Street paid homage to France’s ruling family, the House of Bourbon.

New Orleans was given to the Spanish in 1763 following the Seven Years War. In 1788, a major fire destroyed 80% of the city’s buildings. The Spanish rebuilt many of the damaged buildings, which are still standing today. For this reason, Bourbon Street and the French Quarter display more Spanish than French influence.

The Americans gained control of the colony following the 1803 Louisiana Purchase.They translated the French street names into English, with Rue Bourbon becoming Bourbon Street.

New Orleans in the nineteenth century was both similar to and different from other Southern cities. It was similar in that like other southern cities, its economy was based on selling cash crops such as sugar and tobacco. By 1840, newcomers whose wealth came from these industries turned New Orleans into the third largest metropolis in the country.

The main difference between New Orleans and other southern cities was its unique cultural heritage as a result of having been a former French and Spanish possession. This cultural legacy in the form of its architecture, cuisine and traditions was emphasized by the city seeking to entice tourists by showcasing these more exotic qualities.

The French Quarter was central to this image and became the best-known section of the city by tourists. It quickly became a center of Creole culture that sought to avoid Americanization. Newcomers criticized the perceived Creole fondness for loose morals. This perception was fought by city officials, but persisted as many tourists came to New Orleans to drink, gamble and have sexual encounters in the city’s many brothels, beginning in the 1880s.

Despite this, Bourbon Street was a premier residential area prior to 1900.This changed in the late 1800s and early 1900s, when the Storyville Red Light district was constructed on Basin Street adjacent to the French Quarter . The area became known for prostitution, gambling and vaudeville acts.Jazz is said to have gained prominence here, with artists such as King Oliver and Jelly Roll Morton providing music for the brothels.

This was also the era when some of New Orleans’ most famous restaurants were founded, including Galatoire’s, located at 209 Bourbon Street.It was founded by Jean Galatoire in 1905. Known for years by its characteristic line snaking down Bourbon Street, patrons would wait for hours just to get a table —especially on Fridays.

Before World War II, the French Quarter was emerging as a major asset to the city’s economy. While there was an interest in historic districts emerging at this time, urban developers felt pressure to modernize the city. Simultaneously, property owners capitalized on the wartime influx of people by opening adult-centered nightclubs that capitalized on the city’s risqué image. This led to Bourbon Street becoming the new Storyville in terms of reputation.

By the 1940s and 50s, nightclubs lined Bourbon Street. Over 50 different burlesque shows, striptease acts and exotic dancers could be found there.

There was a move in the 1960s under District Attorney Jim Garrison to clean up Bourbon Street. In August 1962, two months after he was elected district attorney, Garrison began raids on adult establishments on Bourbon Street. His efforts mirrored his predecessors’, which had been largely unsuccessful. He was much more successful than those who came before him, however. He forced closure on a dozen nightclubs guilty of prostitution and selling overpriced alcohol. Following his efforts, Bourbon Street was populated by peep shows and sidewalk beer stands.

When Mayor Moon Landrieu came into office in 1970, he focused his efforts on stimulating tourism. He did so by creating a pedestrian mall on Bourbon Street that made it more walkable.

The 1980s and 90s were characterized by a Disneyfication of Bourbon Street. Critics of the rapid proliferation of souvenir shops and corporate ventures claim that Bourbon Street has become creole Disneyland. They also argue that Bourbon Street’s authenticity has been lost in this process.

 
BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS (NIGHT TIME)

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS (NIGHT TIME)

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS (NIGHT TIME)

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS (NIGHT TIME)

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS (NIGHT TIME)

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS (NIGHT TIME)

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS (NIGHT TIME)

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS (NIGHT TIME)

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS (NIGHT TIME)

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS (NIGHT TIME)

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS (NIGHT TIME)

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS (NIGHT TIME)

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS (NIGHT TIME)

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS (NIGHT TI

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS (NIGHT TIME)

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS (NIGHT TIME)

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JACKSON SQUARE IN THE FRENCH QUARTER, NEW ORLEANS

JACKSON SQUARE, NEW ORLEANS  -  PLAQUE

JACKSON SQUARE, NEW ORLEANS – PLAQUE

Historic Jackson Square, originally known in the 18th century as “Place d’Armes,” and later renamed in honor of the Battle of New Orleans hero Andrew Jackson, is a timeless attraction in the heart of the French Quarter of New Orleans.

This famous landmark facing the Mississippi River is surrounded by historic buildings, including the St. Louis Cathedral, the Presbytere and Cabildo (Louisiana State Museums), not to mention the Lower and Upper Pontalba Apartments, the oldest apartment buildings in the United State. The Pontalba Apartments offer retail shops, museums, galleries and restaurants on the ground level; their second and third floors still house a selection of prestigious apartments.

For well over a half-century, there has been a plein air artist colony at Jackson Square. Local artists paint, draw, create portraits and caricatures, and display their work on the square’s iron fence. Some have been there for generations.

JACKSON SQUARE, NEW ORLEANS

JACKSON SQUARE, NEW ORLEANS

JACKSON SQUARE, NEW ORLEANS  -  ANDREW JACKSON SCULPTURE

JACKSON SQUARE, NEW ORLEANS – ANDREW JACKSON SCULPTURE

JACKSON SQUARE, NEW ORLEANS  -  ST. LOUIS CATHEDRAL

JACKSON SQUARE, NEW ORLEANS – ST. LOUIS CATHEDRAL

WASHINGTON ARTILLARY PARK  -  This raised concrete area on the river side of Decatur Street, directly across from Jackson Square, The cannon mounted in the center and pointing toward the river is a model 1861 Parrot Rifle used in the Civil War. This monument honors the local 141st Field Artillery of the Louisiana National Guard that saw action from the Civil War through World War II. Marble tablets at the base give the history of the group, represented today by the Washington Artillery Association.

WASHINGTON ARTILLARY PARK – This raised concrete area on the river side of Decatur Street, directly across from Jackson Square, The cannon mounted in the center and pointing toward the river is a model 1861 Parrot Rifle used in the Civil War. This monument honors the local 141st Field Artillery of the Louisiana National Guard that saw action from the Civil War through World War II. Marble tablets at the base give the history of the group, represented today by the Washington Artillery Association.

THE MOON WALK

The Moon Walk is a riverside promenade that was created in the 1970s along the Mississippi river. It is popular with tourists who watch the many boats passing by or listen to one of the street musicians.

When Jackson Square was first laid out in the 1720s, it looked out over the Mississippi river. In the second half of the 19th century, after the disastrous floods caused by a Mississippi levee failure, the original 18th century 3ft (1 meter) high levee protecting New Orleans from flooding was heightened several times, creating a barrier between the city and the river. During the 20th century, much of the riverfront was dedicated to industry and commerce and port authorities even erected barriers, making the riverfront inaccessible for decades.
 

This changed in 1976 when a promenade was constructed along the Mississippi river, which once again made the riverfront accessible from the French Quarter. The project was named for mayor Maurice “Moon” Landrieu, during whose tenure the promenade was built.Despite still being separated from the city by a concrete flood barrier, parking

 

lots and train rails, the promenade is a great spot where visitors can walk right near the mighty Mississippi river. It’s become a popular place for visitors who come here to enjoy the view and escape the humidity of the city; thanks to a constant breeze the air feels a lot fresher and cooler here.

You can rest on one of the many iron benches while people watching or boat spotting. The port of New Orleans is one of the largest in the US and the Mississippi is heavily trafficked with all kind of vessels ranging from historic paddle steamers to huge container ships and cruise ships. The Moon Walk is also a popular place for street performers and chances are you’ll see jazz musicians playing in return for some donations.

 
 
MOONWALK PLAQUE

MOON WALK PROMENADE PLAQUE

MOON WALK

MOON WALK PROMENADE

MOON WALK

MOON WALK PROMENADE

CAFE DU MONDE  -  The Original Cafe Du Monde Coffee Stand was established in 1862 in the New Orleans French Market. The Cafe is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. It closes only on Christmas Day and on the day an occasional Hurricane passes too close to New Orleans. The Original Cafe Du Monde is a traditional coffee shop. Its menu consists of dark roasted Coffee and Chicory, Beignets, White and Chocolate Milk, and fresh squeezed Orange Juice. The coffee is served Black or Au Lait. Au Lait means that it is mixed half and half with hot milk. Beignets are square French -style doughnuts, lavishly covered with powdered sugar.

CAFE DU MONDE – The Original Cafe Du Monde Coffee Stand was established in 1862 in the New Orleans French Market. The Cafe is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. It closes only on Christmas Day and on the day an occasional Hurricane passes too close to New Orleans.
The Original Cafe Du Monde is a traditional coffee shop. Its menu consists of dark roasted Coffee and Chicory, Beignets, White and Chocolate Milk, and fresh squeezed Orange Juice. The coffee is served Black or Au Lait. Au Lait means that it is mixed half and half with hot milk. Beignets are square French -style doughnuts, lavishly covered with powdered sugar.

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ

Natchez has been the name of several steamboats.The current onehas been in operation since 1975. The previous Natchez were all operated in the nineteenth century, most by Captain Thomas P. Leathers. Each of the steamboats since Leathers’ first had as its ensign a cotton bale between its stacks.The ninth Natchez, the SS. Natchez, is a sternwheel steamboat based in New Orleans, Louisiana. Steamboat Company and docks at the Toulouse Street Wharf. Day trips include harbor and dinner cruises along the Mississippi river.

The Natchez IX is modeled not after the original Natchez, but rather the steamboats Hudson and Virginia. Her steam engines were originally built in 1925 for the steamboat Clairton, from which the steering system also came. From the S.S. J.D. Ayres were taken the copper bell, made of 250 melted silver dollars.

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ

   The Steam Calliope on Steamboat Natchez The Steam Calliope on Steamboat Natchez The Steam Calliope is a uniquely American instrument, a 32-note steam pipe organ. It has been identified with steamboats since 1865. Today, only four Steamboats operating on the Mississippi River have Steam Calliopes. The Steamboat Natchez, christened in 1975, has a Steam Calliope which is an exact copy of those original instruments built 100 years ago. While walking through the French Quarter during the day, listen carefully at 11 a.m. (except Sunday morning) or at 2 p.m. and you will hear the lively music of a calliope. Follow the sounds to the Toulouse Street Wharf and see the music coming from the Steam Calliope of the Steamboat Natchez, in the form of steam plumes, shooting from each whistle played. The Natchez's Calliope also has synchronized colored lights which light each time a note is struck. The concerts take place just before one of the Natchez's daily treks down the Mississippi River.


The Steam Calliope on Steamboat Natchez
The Steam Calliope is a uniquely American instrument, a 32-note steam pipe organ. It has been identified with steamboats since 1865. Today, only four Steamboats operating on the Mississippi River have Steam Calliopes. The Steamboat Natchez, christened in 1975, has a Steam Calliope which is an exact copy of those original instruments built 100 years ago.
While walking through the French Quarter during the day, listen carefully at 11 a.m. (except Sunday morning) or at 2 p.m. and you will hear the lively music of a calliope. Follow the sounds to the Toulouse Street Wharf and see the music coming from the Steam Calliope of the Steamboat Natchez, in the form of steam plumes, shooting from each whistle played. The Natchez’s Calliope also has synchronized colored lights which light each time a note is struck. The concerts take place just before one of the Natchez’s daily treks down the Mississippi River.

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ  -  REAR PADDLE WHEEL

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ – REAR PADDLE WHEEL

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ  -  ENGINE ROOM

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ – ENGINE ROOM

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ  -  DRIVE SHAFT

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ – DRIVE SHAFT

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ  -  ENGINE ROOM

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ – ENGINE ROOM

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ  -  STEAM DRIVEN PADDLE WHEEL

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ – STEAM DRIVEN PADDLE WHEEL

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ  =  A DINNER CRUISE

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ = A DINNER CRUISE

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ  -  DIXIEAND JAZZ

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ – DIXIEAND JAZZ

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK

Louis Armstrong Park, formerly known as Beauregard Square, is a 32-acre park located in the Tremé neighborhood of New Orleans, Louisiana, just across Rampart Street from the French Quarter. It was designed by New Orleans architect Robin Riley.

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK   -  STATUE OF LOUIS ARMSTRONG

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK – STATUE OF LOUIS ARMSTRONG

JAZZ IN THE PARK

Starting September 5, 2013, you could have been  able to catch the best New Orleans jazz bands performing live outdoors every Thursday through October 31, 2013. There were the brilliant sounds of acts like The Stooges Band, Rebirth Brass Band, Erica Falls, The Brass-A-Holics, The Soul Rebels, and Treme Brass Band that would fill out the top notch lineup of this free concert series. For the final night on October 31, in addition to Rebirth, the People United for Armstrong Park promised a special surprise guest.

In addition to a night of New Orleans music, Jazz in the Park’s  Food and Craft Marketplace will feature some of the best New Orleans cuisine from local vendor and food truck favorites. As for crafts, local artists will be showing and selling hand-crafted, authentic New Orleans wares as you groove the night away, including jewelry, organic beauty products, hand-painted t-shirts, and New Orleans art.

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LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK   -  JAZZ IN THE PARK

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK – JAZZ IN THE PARK

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK   -  ENJOYING THE MUSIC

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK – ENJOYING THE MUSIC

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK   -  PILLOW VENDOR

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK – PILLOW VENDOR

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK   - BEAUTY SUPPLIES VENDOR

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK – BEAUTY SUPPLIES VENDOR

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK   -  FOOD VENDOR

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK – FOOD VENDOR

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK   -  FOOD VENDOR

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK – FOOD VENDOR

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK   -  VENDOR SELLING COSTUME JEWELRY AND TEE-SHIRTS

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK – VENDOR SELLING COSTUME JEWELRY AND TEE-SHIRTS

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK   =  SOMETHING ELSE CAFE

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK = SOMETHING ELSE CAFE

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK   -  FOOD VENDOR

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK – FOOD VENDOR

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK   -  PAT O'BRIEN'S

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK – PAT O’BRIEN’S

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK  -  FOOD VENDOR

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK – FOOD VENDOR

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK   -  STATUE OF MARCHING BAND

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK – STATUE OF MARCHING BANDNEW ORLEANS MARDI GRAS

NEW ORLEANS MARDI GRAS

Mardi Gras (meaning “Fat Tuesday”) is an annual Carnival celebration in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States.

The New Orleans Carnival season, a variation of the traditional manner of preparing for the start of the Catholic season of Lent, starts after Twelfth Night, on Epiphany (January 6). It is a season of parades, balls (some of them masquerade balls), and king cake parties. It has traditionally been part of the winter social season; which at one time was when parties for Southern Society women, débutante balls, were arranged.

Celebrations are concentrated for about two weeks before and through Fat Tuesday (Mardi Gras in French), the day before Ash Wednesday. Usually there is one major parade each day (weather permitting); many days have several large parades. The largest and most elaborate parades take place the last five days of the season. In the final week of Carnival, many events large and small occur throughout New Orleans and surrounding communities. Neighboring communities also hold Carnival celebrations.

The parades in New Orleans are organized by Carnival krewes. Krewe float riders toss throws to the crowds; the most common throws are strings of plastic colorful beads, doubloons (aluminum or wooden dollar-sized coins usually impressed with a krewe logo), decorated plastic throw cups, and small inexpensive toys. Major krewes follow the same parade schedule and route each year.

While many tourists center their Mardi Gras season activities on Bourbon Street and the French Quarter, none of the major Mardi Gras parades has entered the Quarter since 1972 because of its narrow streets and overhead obstructions. Instead, major parades originate in the Uptown and Mid-City districts and follow a route along St. Charles Avenue and Canal Street, on the upriver side of the French Quarter. Exposing body parts, or “flashing”, in an effort to catch more beads or throws, is frowned upon by the police department and can be grounds for a ticket or an arrest. Though it is a growing trend for uninhibited, mostly younger women to show their breasts, this practice mostly only takes place on and around Bourbon Street in the French Quarter. The Uptown and Mid-City parade routes are family-friendly gatherings for citizens of all ages to enjoy the parades.

“Mardi Gras” specifically refers to the Tuesday before lent, the highlight of the season. The term can also be used less specifically the whole Carnival season, sometimes as “the Mardi Gras season”. The term “Fat Tuesday” or “Mardi Gras Day” always refers only to that specific day.

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MARDI GRAS WORLD

Mardi Gras World (also known as Blaine Kern’s Mardi Gras World, MGW) is a tourist attraction in New Orleans, Louisiana. Guests tour the working warehouse where floats are made for Mardi Gras parades in New Orleans. Mardi Gras World is located on the Mississippi River next to the Morial Convention Center, and also hosts private parties and corporate events.

History

In 1947, Blaine Kern, Sr. founded Blaine Kern Artists. Kern came from a family of float builders, but began creating floats after 1940, when a surgeon and krewe captain who had seen a mural by Kern hired him to create floats for the Krewe of Alla.Kern’s business expanded from there. Kern, who traveled to Europe to learn float building techniques, has gained an international reputation in float building, with floats beyond New Orleans for Las Vegas, NV; Mobile, AL; Galveston, TX; Montreal, Canada; and the Universal Studios Mardi Gras parade.

In 1984, Mardi Gras World was created as a tourist attraction to show visitors a behind-the-scenes look at float building.

 
 
MARDI GRAS WORLD  -  ENTRANCE

MARDI GRAS WORLD – ENTRANCE

MARDI GRAS WORLD  -  ENTRANCE

MARDI GRAS WORLD – ENTRANCE

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD  -  FLOATS

MARDI GRAS WORLD – FLOATS

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

MARDI GRAS WORLD

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THE HONEY ISLAND SWAMP, SLIDELL, LOUISIANA

The Honey Island Swamp (French: Marais de l’Île-de-Miel) is a marshland located in the eastern portion of the U.S. state of Louisiana in St. Tammany Parish. Honey Island earned its name because of the honeybees once seen on a nearby isle.The swamp is bordered on the north by U.S. 90, on the south by Lake Borgne, on the east by the Pearl River and the west by the West Pearl River.

It is one of the least-altered river swamps in the United States. Considered by many to be one of the most pristine swampland habitats in the United States, the Honey Island Swamp covers an area that is over 20 miles (30 km) long and nearly 7 miles (10 km) across, with 34,896 of its 70,000 acres (280 km²) government sanctioned as permanently protected wildlife area. This swamp is also the home of the legendary Honey Island Swamp monster, which has from time to time been known as the “Tainted Keitre”. Honey Island Swamp is located on the Pearl River wildlife management area and managed by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

Honey Island Swamp monsterThe swamp is famous for being the home of the Honey Island Swamp monster.The creature is described as bipedal, seven feet (2.2 metres) tall, with gray hair and yellow eyes. It is accompanied by a disgusting smell. Footprints supposedly left by the creature have four toes. The first claimed sighting was in 1963 by Harlan Ford, a retired Air traffic controller who took up wildlife photography. After his death in 1980, a reel of Super 8 film showing the creature was allegedly found among his belongings. In 1974 the monster gained national fame after Ford and a friend claimed to have found unusual footprints in the area, as well as the body of a wild boar whose throat had been gashed. Ford continued to hunt the creature for the next six years. The idea of a large, ape-like creature in the area is not without its critics, notably the local ecologist Paul Wagner, who with his wife Sue run nature tours in the area. They claim they have not seen any evidence for it. A local legend tells of a train crash in the area in the early twentieth century. A traveling circus was on the train, and from it a group of chimpanzees escaped, interbreeding with the local alligator population.

DR. WAGNER'S HONEY ISLAND SWAMP TOURS

DR. WAGNER’S HONEY ISLAND SWAMP TOURS

HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HOUSES ALONG THE HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HOUSES ALONG THE
HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HOUSES ALONG THE HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HOUSES ALONG THE
HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HOUSES ALONG THE HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HOUSES ALONG THE
HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HOUSES ALONG THE HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HOUSES ALONG THE
HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HOUSES ALONG THE HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HOUSES ALONG THE
HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HOUSES ALONG THE HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

HOUSES ALONG THE
HONEY ISLAND SWAMP

_________________

POEM:

Big Easy Currents

Banks holding muddy Mississippi water-
River, your strong currents invite me
But the pull of another current wins.

Steps over the trolley tracks
The Saturday crowds stroll by
An occasional jazz note hits the ears
A messy beignet hits the lips.

It is the French quarter awakening-
3:00pm and the children with
Their mommies, strollers, and tourist cameras
start to disappear.
The current is changing, for the night
is soon to arrive.

Dressed. Dressed for the rhythms, the beats
the swaying, the foot tapping.
Jazz flows out of the banks of
the sagging, yet strong doors.
The crowd steps in.
The current is strong, friendly.

Notes swirl in their eddies.
The swaying begins.
The smoke hangs.
The current is strong-
Unpredictably strong and sweet.

______________________________

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA

Birmingham is the largest city in Alabama. The city is the county seat of Jefferson County. The city’s population is 212,237 according to the 2010 United States Census. The Birmingham-Hoover Metropolitan Statistical Area has a population of about 1,128,047 according to the 2010 Census, which is approximately one quarter of Alabama’s population.

Birmingham was founded in 1871, during the post-Civil War Reconstruction period, through the merger of three pre-existing farm towns, notably, former Elyton. It grew from there, annexing many more of its smaller neighbors, into an industrial and railroad transportation center with a focus on mining, the iron and steel industry, and railroading. Birmingham was named for Birmingham, United Kingdom, one of the UK’s major industrial cities. Many, if not most, of the original settlers who founded Birmingham were of English ancestry. In one writer’s view, the city was planned as a place where cheap, non-unionized, and African-American labor from rural Alabama could be employed in the city’s steel mills and blast furnaces, giving it a competitive advantage over industrial cities in the Midwest and Northeast.

From its founding through the end of the 1960s, Birmingham was a primary industrial center of the South. The pace of Birmingham’s growth during the period from 1881 through 1920 earned its nicknames The Magic City and The Pittsburgh of the South. Much like Pittsburgh, Birmingham’s major industries were iron and steel production, plus a major component of the railroading industry, where rails and railroad cars were both manufactured in Birmingham. In the field of railroading, the two primary hubs of railroading in the Deep South were nearby Atlanta and Birmingham, beginning in the 1860s and continuing through to the present day. The economy diversified during the latter half of the twentieth century. Though the manufacturing industry maintains a strong presence in Birmingham, other businesses and industries such as banking, telecommunications, transportation, electrical power transmission, medical care, college education, and insurance have risen in stature. Mining in the Birmingham area is no longer a major industry with the exception of coal mining. Birmingham ranks as one of the most important business centers in the Southeastern United States and is also one of the largest banking centers in the United States. In addition, the Birmingham area serves as headquarters to one Fortune 500 company: Regions Financial, along with five other Fortune 1000 companies.

In higher education, Birmingham has been the location of the University of Alabama School of Medicine (formerly the Medical College of Alabama) and the University of Alabama School of Dentistry since 1947. Since that time it has also obtained a campus of the University of Alabama, University of Alabama at Birmingham (founded circa 1969), one of three main campuses of the University of Alabama System. It is also home of the private Birmingham-Southern College. Between these two universities and Samford University, the Birmingham area has major colleges of medicine, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy, law, engineering, and nursing. Birmingham is home to three of the state’s five law schools: Cumberland School of Law, Birmingham School of Law, and Miles Law School. Birmingham is also the headquarters of the Southeastern Conference, one of the major U.S. collegiate athletic conferences.

 

Birmingham was founded on June 1, 1871, by the Elyton Land Company whose investors included cotton planters, bankers and railroad entrepreneurs. It sold lots near the planned crossing of the Alabama & Chattanooga and South & North Alabama railroads including land formerly a part of the Benjamin P. Worthington Plantation. The first business at that crossroads was the trading post and country store operated by Marre & Allen. The site of the railroad crossing was notable for the nearby deposits of iron ore, coal, and limestone – the three main raw materials used in making steel. Birmingham is the only place worldwide where significant amounts of all three minerals can be found in close proximity.From the start the new city was planned as a great center of industry. The founders, organized as the Elyton Land Company, borrowed the name of Birmingham, one of England’s main industrial cities, to advertise that point. The growth of the planned city was impeded by an outbreak of cholera and a Wall Street crash in 1873. However, it began to grow shortly afterward at an explosive rate.

The town of Elyton, Alabama, and several other surrounding towns were absorbed into Birmingham in 1911.

The start of the 20th century brought the substantial growth that gave Birmingham the nickname “The Magic City” as the downtown area developed from a low-rise commercial and residential district into a busy grid of neoclassical mid-rise and high-rise buildings and busy streetcar lines. Between 1902 and 1912 four large office buildings were constructed at the intersection of 20th Street, the central north–south spine of the city, and 1st Avenue North, which connected the warehouses and industrial facilities stretching along the east–west railroad corridor. This impressive group of early skyscrapers was nicknamed “The Heaviest Corner on Earth”.

Birmingham was hit by the 1916 Irondale earthquake (magnitude 5.1). A few buildings in the area were slightly damaged. It was felt as far as Atlanta and neighboring states.

Panorama of Birmingham, Alabama in 1916

The Great Depression hit Birmingham especially hard as sources of capital that were fueling the city’s growth rapidly dried up at the same time that farm laborers, driven off the land, made their way to the city in search of work. New Deal programs made important contributions to the city’s infrastructure and artistic legacy, including such key improvements as Vulcan’s tower and Oak Mountain State Park.

The wartime demand for steel and the post-war building boom gave Birmingham a rapid return to prosperity. Manufacturing diversified beyond the production of raw materials and major civic institutions such as schools, parks and museums, were able to expand their scope.

Birmingham civil rights movement

In the 1950s and 1960s Birmingham received national and international attention as a center of the civil rights struggle for African-Americans. Locally the movement’s activists were led by Fred Shuttlesworth, a fiery preacher who became legendary for his fearlessness in the face of violence, notably a string of racially motivated bombings that earned Birmingham the derisive nickname “Bombingham”.

16th Street Baptist Church, now a National Historic Landmark

16th Street Baptist Church, now a National Historic Landmark

A watershed in the civil rights movement occurred in 1963 when Shuttlesworth requested that Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), which Shuttlesworth had co-founded, come to Birmingham, where King had once been a pastor, to help end segregation.Together they launched “Project C” (for “Confrontation”), a massive assault on the Jim Crow system. During April and May daily sit-ins and mass marches organized and led by movement leader James Bevel were met with police repression, tear gas, attack dogs, fire hoses, and arrests. More than 3,000 people were arrested during these protests, almost all of them high-school age children. These protests were ultimately successful, leading not only to desegregation of public accommodations in Birmingham but also the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

While imprisoned for having taken part in a nonviolent protest, Dr. King wrote the now famous Letter from Birmingham Jail, a defining treatise in his cause against segregation. Birmingham is also known for a bombing which occurred later that year, in which four black girls were killed by a bomb planted at the 16th Street Baptist Church. The event would inspire the African-American poet Dudley Randall’s opus, “The Ballad of Birmingham”, as well as jazz musician John Coltrane’s song “Alabama”.

In 1998 the Birmingham Pledge, written by local attorney James Rotch, was introduced at the Martin Luther King Unity Breakfast. As a grassroots community commitment to combating racism and prejudice, it has since then been used for programs in all fifty states and in more than twenty countries. In 2011, the Highland Park neighborhood of Birmingham was named as a 2011 America’s Great Place by the American Planning Association.

KELLY INGRAM PARK

Kelly Ingram Park, formerly West Park,is a four acre (16,000 m²) park located in Birmingham, Alabama. It is bounded by 16th and 17th Streets and 5th and 6th Avenues North in the Birmingham Civil Rights District. The park, just outside the doors of the 16th Street Baptist Church, served as a central staging ground for large-scale demonstrations during the American Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s.

Reverends Martin Luther King, Jr., James Bevel, and Fred Shuttlesworth of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference directed the organized boycotts and protests of 1963 which centered on Kelly Ingram Park.It was here, during the first week of May 1963, that Birmingham police and firemen, under orders from Public Safety Commissioner Eugene “Bull” Connor, confronted demonstrators, many of them children and high school students, first with mass arrests and then with police dogs and firehoses. Images from those confrontations, broadcast nationwide, spurred a public outcry which turned the nation’s attention to the struggle for racial equality. The demonstrations in Birmingham brought city leaders to agree to an end of public segregation and helped to ensure the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

The park was named in 1932 for local firefighter Osmond Kelly Ingram, who was the first sailor in the United States Navy to be killed in World War I. In 1992 it was completely renovated and rededicated as “A Place of Revolution and Reconciliation” to coincide with the opening of the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute, an interpretive museum and research center, which adjoins the park to the west.

Statue of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

The park is the setting for several pieces of sculpture related to the Civil Rights Movement. Besides a central fountain and commemorative statues of Dr. King, Rev. Shuttlesworth and other heroes of the movement, there are three installations by artist James Drake which flank a circular “Freedom Walk”. They bring the visitor inside the portrayals of terror and sorrow of the 1963 confrontations. A limestone sculpture by Raymond Kasky depicts three ministers, John Thomas Porter, Nelson H. Smith and A. D. King, kneeling in prayer. Additional monuments honor Pauline Fletcher, Carrie Tuggle, Ruth Jackson, Arthur Shores, Julius Ellsberry, and the “foot soldiers” and other “unsung heroes” of the movement.

The park hosts several local family festivals and cultural and entertainment events throughout the year. The Civil Rights Institute provides audio-tour guides for the park which feature remembrances by many of the figures directly involved in the confrontations. Urban Impact, Inc. also provides guided tours by appointment.

KELLY INGRAM PARK  -  LOOKING TOWARD THE 16th Street Baptist Church

KELLY INGRAM PARK – LOOKING TOWARD THE
16th Street Baptist Church

KELLY INGRAM PARK

KELLY INGRAM PARK

KELLY INGRAM PARK  -   PLAQUE FOR FIRST AMERICAN SAILOR KILLED IN ACTION  - OCTOBER 1, 1917

KELLY INGRAM PARK –
PLAQUE FOR FIRST AMERICAN SAILOR KILLED IN ACTION – OCTOBER 1, 1917

KELLY INGRAM PARK  -  HORSE CHESTNUT TREE DEDICATED TI VICTIMS OF INTOLERANCE AND DISCRIMINATION

KELLY INGRAM PARK –
HORSE CHESTNUT TREE DEDICATED TO VICTIMS OF INTOLERANCE AND DISCRIMINATION

KELLY INGRAM PARK  -   Firehosing of Demonstrators Sculpture by James Drake

KELLY INGRAM PARK –
Firehosing of Demonstrators
Sculpture by James Dr

KELLY INGRAM PARK  -  STATUE OF REV. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR

KELLY INGRAM PARK – STATUE OF REV. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR

KELLY INGRAM PARK  -   A newly unveiled statue honoring four slain young church girls graces the corner of Kelly Ingram Park, across the street from the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., Sunday, Sept. 15, 2013.

KELLY INGRAM PARK –
A newly unveiled statue honoring four slain young church girls graces the corner of Kelly Ingram Park, across the street from the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., Sunday, Sept. 15, 2013.

KELLY INGRAM PARK  -  STATUE WITH THE INSCRIPTION, "AIN'T AFRAID OF YOUR JAIL."

KELLY INGRAM PARK – STATUE WITH THE INSCRIPTION, “AIN’T AFRAID OF YOUR JAIL.”

KELLY INGRAM PARK  -  The Foot Soldier Sculpture by Ronald S. McDowell

KELLY INGRAM PARK – The Foot Soldier
Sculpture by Ronald S. McDowell

KELLY INGRAM PARK  -  Police Dog Attack Sculpture by James Drake

KELLY INGRAM PARK – Police Dog Attack
Sculpture by James Drake

KELLY INGRAM PARK   -   Three Ministers Kneeling The statue was based on the Revs. N.H. Smith Jr., A.D. King and John T. Porter, who led a march in downtown Birmingham on Palm Sunday 1963 to support the Revs. Martin Luther King Jr., Fred Shuttlesworth, and Ralph Abernathy, who had been jailed. Sculpture by Raymond Kaskey

KELLY INGRAM PARK –
Three Ministers Kneeling
The statue was based on the Revs. N.H. Smith Jr., A.D. King and John T. Porter, who led a march in downtown Birmingham on Palm Sunday 1963 to support the Revs. Martin Luther King Jr., Fred Shuttlesworth, and Ralph Abernathy, who had been jailed.
Sculpture by Raymond Kaskey

KELLY INGRAM PARK  -  TRIBUTE TO CARRIE A. TUGGLE

KELLY INGRAM PARK – TRIBUTE TO CARRIE A. TUGGLE

KELLY INGRAM PARK  -  TRIBUTE TO DR. RUTH J. JACKSON

KELLY INGRAM PARK – TRIBUTE TO DR. RUTH J. JACKSON

KELLY INGRAM PARK  -  TRIBUTE TO JULIUS ELLSBERRY

KELLY INGRAM PARK – TRIBUTE TO JULIUS ELLSBERRY

KELLY INGRAM PARK  -  TRIBUTE TO PAULINE BRAY FLETCHER

KELLY INGRAM PARK – TRIBUTE TO PAULINE BRAY FLETCHER

KELLY INGRAM PARK  -  REFLECTING POOL - REPRESENTING PEACE AND HARMONY BETWEEN THE RACES

KELLY INGRAM PARK – REFLECTING POOL – REPRESENTING PEACE AND HARMONY BETWEEN THE RACES

KELLY INGRAM PARK

KELLY INGRAM PARK

Birmingham Civil Rights Institute

Birmingham Civil Rights Institute is a large interpretive museum and research center in Birmingham, Alabama that depicts the struggles of the American Civil Rights Movement in the 1950s and 1960s. The Institute is located in the Civil Rights District, which includes the historic 16th Street Baptist Church, Kelly Ingram Park, Fourth Avenue Business District, and the Alabama Jazz Hall of Fame located in the Carver Theatre. The Institute opened in November 1992, and had more than 25,000 visitors during its first week.

The Institute showcases a walking journey through the “living institution”, which displays the lessons of the past as a positive way to chart new directions for the future. The permanent exhibitions are a self-directed journey through Birmingham’s contributions to the Civil Rights Movement and human rights struggles. Multimedia exhibitions focus on the history of African-American life and the struggle for civil rights. The Oral History Project, one of the museum’s multimedia exhibits, documents Birmingham’s role in the Civil Rights Movement through the voices of movement participants. The museum is an affiliate in the Smithsonian Affiliations program. Through this program the museum can acquire long-term loans and is currently hosting the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service exhibition “Let Your Motto Be resistance.”

The archives of the Institute serve as a national resource for educators and researchers. They are a repository for the collection and preservation of civil rights documents and artifacts. The archival information system is computer-linked to the Birmingham Public Library and is a vital component of the Archives Division.

The Birmingham Civil Rights Institute is also a community resource for meetings, seminars and workshops. A Community Meeting Room is available to local organizations.

CIVIL RIGHTS INSTITUTE

CIVIL RIGHTS INSTITUTE

CIVIL RIGHTS INSTITUTE

CIVIL RIGHTS INSTITUTE

CIVIL RIGHTS INSTITUTE  -  STATUE OF REVERAND SHUTTLESWORTH

CIVIL RIGHTS INSTITUTE – STATUE OF REVERAND SHUTTLESWORTH

VIDEOS:
————-

GRAND OLE OPRY  NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE,

(While I was in Nashville, I visited the Grand Ole Opry. This is a sample of what I saw that evening).

https://www.dropbox.com/s/8zpxlozpsbpxafk/DEEP%20SOUTH%20MUSIC%20TOUR.m4v

 

—————

B.B. KINGS HOUSE BAND, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE

———————————–

THEO D  “THE BOOGIEMAN,”  CLARKSDALE, MISSISSIPPI

————————————–

GROUND ZERO BLUES CLUB, CLARKSDALE, MISSISSIPPI

—————————————-

CAJUN MUSIC AT PREJEANS RESTAURANT, LAFAYETTE, MISSISSIPPI

—————————————–

BOURBON STREET, NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA

———————————————-

DUKES OF DIXIELAND  JAZZ BAND, ABOARD THE STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ, NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA

———————————————

STEAM CALLIOPE ABOARD THE STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ

—————————————————

LOUIS ARMSTRONG PARK, NEW ORLEANS GAYNIELLE NEVILLLE AND HER SWEET STUFF

———————————————-

PHOTOS:

LEONARD EPSTEIN

JANELLE BURGESS

————————–

VIDEOS:

LEONARD EPSTEIN

 

This Lockheed JetStar was dubbed Hound Dog II:
This Lockheed JetStar was dubbed Hound Dog II:
 
On April 17, 1975 Elvis bought a Convair 880 Jet, recently taken out of service by Delta Airlines, for the then-substantial sum of $250,000. After refurbishing, the total exceeded $600,000.

– See more at: http://www.elvis.com.au/presley/lisa_marie_convair_880_jet.shtml#sthash.WyMR2FnD.dpuf

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One Comment leave one →
  1. Jack Guberman permalink
    January 25, 2014 2:20 am

    Now I know what you do in your spare time. That was the most extensive coverage of a trip I have seen. I enjoyed it thoroughly. Thanks, Jack

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