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PAPUA NEW GUINEA – MADANG (PHOTOS AND VIDEOS)

July 5, 2013

MADANG

Madang Province is some 300 kilometers long and 160 kilometers wide encompassing four large and many small offshore islands. The province totals 27,970 square kilometers and has a population of over 240,000 people. To the south lie the towering Bismarck Ranges containing PNG’s highest mountain Mt Wilhelm (4509m). The warm Bismarck Sea laps the northern coast, and the region is drained northward by the larger Ramu, Sogeram, Gogol and Malas Rivers. The mountains are timber rich and with large stands of trees and rain forest, whilst the coastal plain is open and palm studded.

The Madang coast received its first real western exploration at the hands of the Russian explorer Nicolai Miklouha-Maclay in 1871. He introduced pineapples, mangoes, beans, pumpkins and other new foods. In 1884 the German New Guinea Kompangie started development of the region, building tobacco, cotton and coffee plantations at Bogia and around t Astrolabe Bay.
The city of Madang was occupied by the Japanese in the Second World War, on 1 May 1942. During the war Madang was destroyed in heavy fighting with much loss of life on both sides. The township was recaptured by allied soldiers on 24th April 1944. Post war developments have been few and mainly restricted to the coast and Madang town.

We pulled up alongside the dock in Madang and were greeted by local dancers which I must admit is a wonderful way to start the day.

We then aassembled on the wharf to go to the Bilbil Village.

The Bilbil Village Tour is a 35 minute bus ride out of town through the lush green countryside on roads that were much more comfortable than Rabaul, but still and adventure of their own. The village is located on a beautiful black sand beach surrounded by palms and the traditional sago palm homes stand high off the ground to allow for the cool ocean breezes.

We were greeted by the local head man and after a quick walk around the village were seated for a presentation of the traditional Sing Sing by the village.After the Singsing we wre treated to the presentation on pot making; this is what Bilbil is famous for. Local clay is mixed with the black sand and hand shaped into food and water containers. The process was very fast with the firing taking only minutes. These pots were traded for other items up and down the coast and are available for purchase.

Prior to 1904, the Bilbil people lived on an island offshore from Madang, trading clay pots along the coast from Kar Kar Island to western Morobe. The island was too small to produce enough food for the inhabitants, and the trade therefore was an essential element of their life. They moved to the mainland to their existing village site to improve their subsistence levels.
Over the centuries the Bilbils have been great seaman, and they sailed their large two-masted canoes for hundreds of kilometers along the coast. They would call into many villages and trade their pots for food, wooden bowls, pigs and other trading goods.

WELCOME TO MADANG BY A TRADITIONAL DANCE GROUP

WELCOME TO MADANG BY A TRADITIONAL DANCE GROUP

THE WOMEN WEAR COLORFUL GRASS SKIRTS AND THE HEAD DRESSES ARE MADE FROM THE CROWN PIGEON

THE WOMEN WEAR COLORFUL GRASS SKIRTS AND THE HEAD DRESSES ARE MADE FROM THE CROWN PIGEON

MADANG TRADITIONAL DANCERS

MADANG TRADITIONAL DANCERS

THIS IS THE LIZARD DANCE

THIS IS THE LIZARD DANCE

MADANG TRADITIONAL DANCERS

MADANG TRADITIONAL DANCERS

MALE DANCERS WITH DRUMS COVERED WITH LIZARD SKIN

MALE DANCERS WITH DRUMS COVERED WITH LIZARD SKIN

THESE DANCERS ARE FROM BARIM A VILLAGE NEAR MADANG

THESE DANCERS ARE FROM BARIM A VILLAGE NEAR MADANG

DANCERS OF ALL AGES PARTICIPATE IN THESE SING SING DANCES

DANCERS OF ALL AGES PARTICIPATE IN THESE SING SING DANCES

MALE DANCERS

MALE DANCERS

FEMALE DANCERS

FEMALE DANCERS

THE LIZARD DANCE

THE LIZARD DANCE

BILBIL VILLAGE

After being greeted by the local head man and after a quick walk around the village we were seated for a presentation of the traditional Sing Sing by the village.After the Sing Sing we were treated to the presentation on pot making; this is what Bilbil is famous for. Local clay is mixed with the black sand and hand shaped into food and water containers. The process was very fast with the firing taking only minutes. These pots were traded for other items up and down the coast and are available for purchase.

BILBIL VILLAGE DANCERS

BILBIL VILLAGE DANCERS

FEMALE BILBIL DANCERS

FEMALE BILBIL DANCERS

BILBIL DRUMMER AND DANCERS

BILBIL DRUMMER AND DANCERS

BILBIL DANCERS

BILBIL DANCERS

BILBIL DANCERS

BILBIL DANCERS

BILBIL DRUMMERS POSING

BILBIL DRUMMERS POSING

BILBIL HEADDRESS

BILBIL HEADDRESS

BILBIL WOMAN DANCER

BILBIL WOMAN DANCER

BILBIL WOMAN DANCER (CLOSE UP)

BILBIL WOMAN DANCER WITH FLOWERS, NECKLACES AND SHARK TOOTH HEADDRESS

BILBIL HEADDRESS

BILBIL HEADDRESS

CHILDREN POSING AT BILBIL VILLAGE

CHILDREN POSING AT BILBIL VILLAGE

IMG_3769

POT MAKING BILBIL PEOPLE

Pot Making Bilibil women make Cookware and bakeware pots, which are still produced in the traditional way. Clay is collected in the bush, mixed with sand and water and left to dry. A few days later it is formed into a wet mixture and again left to dry. Then the women pull off enough clay and shape the lip of their pot. They hollow out the inside with a stone and beat the outside with a flat board. It must then be left to dry again before the final smoothing takes place. Before they are Pit fired pottery fired , red clay is painted on the pots. This turns them a glossy red and black when they are pulled out of the fire . These pots are put to many uses most importantly, they are used for bride price ceremonies. Sometimes they are still barter ed for food as in the old days. The inland people come down from their mountains and meet the Bilibils at a pre arranged place. The pots are then exchanged for taro and yam vegetable yams from the mountains. No money is used in these exchanges. Relationship to the Ocean Over the centuries the Bilibils have been great seaman seamen , and they sailed their large two masted canoe s for hundreds of kilometres along the coast. They would call into many villages and trade their pots … houses where some are put aside to sprout for the new crop.

BILBIL POTMAKERS

BILBIL POTMAKERS

LOOKING OVER THE SHOUULDER OF A BILBIL POT MAKER

LOOKING OVER THE SHOUULDER OF A BILBIL POT MAKER

BILBIL POTS AND BAKEWARE

BILBIL POTS AND BAKE WARE

MADANG TOWN

Madang Town is the main town of Madang Province.The land area of Madang Province is almost twice of Kumamoto Pref. and it located in North-
west from Port Moresby, the capital city of Papua New Guinea.Madang Town is basically not a

POLITICAL POSTERS IN MADANG

POLITICAL POSTERS IN MADANG

COOKING UTENSILS AT THE OUTDOOR KITCHEN BILBIL VILLAGE

COOKING UTENSILS AT THE OUTDOOR KITCHEN BILBIL VILLAGE

PEOPLE IN MADANG STANDING UNDER A SIGN OF TOWN REGULATIONS, NO GARBAGE THROWN IN THE STREET, NO SPITTING, AND GENERALLY KEEPING THE TOWN CLEAN

PEOPLE IN MADANG STANDING UNDER A SIGN OF TOWN REGULATIONS, NO GARBAGE THROWN IN THE STREET, NO SPITTING, AND GENERALLY ABOUT KEEPING THE TOWN CLEAN.

MADANG POST OFFICE

MADANG POST OFFICE

PEOPLE WAITING FOR TRANSPORTATION

PEOPLE WAITING FOR TRANSPORTATION

PUBLIC MOTOR VEHICLE (PMV) USED FOR TRANSPORTATION IN MADANG

PUBLIC MOTOR VEHICLE (PMV) USED FOR TRANSPORTATION IN MADANG

MADANG MARKETS - In the center of Madang is a busy local market. People come daily from the PNG Highlands with produce to sell and load up with goods to take back with them at the end of the day. A wide variety of fruits and vegetables are available.

MADANG MARKETS – In the center of Madang is a busy local market. People come daily from the PNG Highlands with produce to sell and load up with goods to take back with them at the end of the day. A wide variety of fruits and vegetables are available.

COLORFUL PLASTIC SHOPPING BAGS ARE AVAILABLE FOR SALE

COLORFUL PLASTIC SHOPPING BAGS ARE AVAILABLE FOR SALE

BILUMS ARE FOR SALE AT THE MARKETS - A bilum is a string bag made by hand in Papua New Guinea. The bag can be made by a process known as looping or knotless netting [1] or by crocheting. Traditionally, the string used was handmade, normally from plant materials. Now, however, many people who can afford to do so make their bilums from store bought yarn and string. Bilums are used to carry a wide range of items, from shopping goods in large bilums to personal items in purse-sized varieties. Mothers often carry their babies in bilums. Whilst the traditional method of making bilums using woven plant reeds is still widely spread across Papua New Guinea, many villagers are now finding it easier to use wool-based yarns to make their bags. This allows a greater diversity of color schemes to be incorporated into the making of the bilums, and as a result they are more highly sought after, due to their highly visible and different patterns and color combinations. Local men usually prefer to use long handle styles so they can be worn over the shoulder, freeing their arms for more important issues, like carrying important bush knives or to grab onto things while hiking mountains. Women often prefer the short handled versions that they can sling across their foreheads to carry greater loads, such as babies and/or large quantities of foodstuff (yams/potatoes/kau-kau etc.) Either way, there is now a definite swing to the more vivid color/patterning styles that afford the bearer to be more distinctive in making his/her fashion statement. The concept of bilums are very marketable overseas, and the French have now actually patented the "bilum" product, using recycled car seat belts, and other plastic materials to create their own version of the bilum. Bilums are commonly used in the Maprik and Wosera area of East Sepik Province, Papua New Guinea. They come in different patterns, each pattern resembling certain tribe or clan. More complex and specific patterns are made for carrying during public appearances or displayed during the ceremonial events. The special ceremonial events include yam festivals, tambuan dances, bride price payment, dead compensation and butter system between the river people and the inland wosera people. The complex patterns are of inheritance and only very few ladies in a village possess those inherited talents. The Wosera people are the only tribe that maintains the originalities of the bilum patterns and treasures the complexity of their inherited patterns and its the only significance of that area. The bilum concept has spread quite quickly down to the coast and then up to the Highlands in the last decade especially when women in noncircular business identified bilum making as a source of regular income. In the highland region they have extended the bilum concept to make bilumwares especially bilum dresses and skirts. The bilumware is now becoming common during school graduation dressings. Bilumware is now marketable to Papua New Guinea citizens living overseas.

BILUMS ARE FOR SALE AT THE MARKETS –
A bilum is a string bag made by hand in Papua New Guinea. The bag can be made by a process known as looping or knotless netting [1] or by crocheting. Traditionally, the string used was handmade, normally from plant materials. Now, however, many people who can afford to do so make their bilums from store bought yarn and string.
Bilums are used to carry a wide range of items, from shopping goods in large bilums to personal items in purse-sized varieties. Mothers often carry their babies in bilums.
Whilst the traditional method of making bilums using woven plant reeds is still widely spread across Papua New Guinea, many villagers are now finding it easier to use wool-based yarns to make their bags. This allows a greater diversity of color schemes to be incorporated into the making of the bilums, and as a result they are more highly sought after, due to their highly visible and different patterns and color combinations.
Local men usually prefer to use long handle styles so they can be worn over the shoulder, freeing their arms for more important issues, like carrying important bush knives or to grab onto things while hiking mountains. Women often prefer the short handled versions that they can sling across their foreheads to carry greater loads, such as babies and/or large quantities of foodstuff (yams/potatoes/kau-kau etc.)
Either way, there is now a definite swing to the more vivid color/patterning styles that afford the bearer to be more distinctive in making his/her fashion statement.
The concept of bilums are very marketable overseas, and the French have now actually patented the “bilum” product, using recycled car seat belts, and other plastic materials to create their own version of the bilum.
Bilums are commonly used in the Maprik and Wosera area of East Sepik Province, Papua New Guinea. They come in different patterns, each pattern resembling certain tribe or clan. More complex and specific patterns are made for carrying during public appearances or displayed during the ceremonial events. The special ceremonial events include yam festivals, tambuan dances, bride price payment, dead compensation and butter system between the river people and the inland wosera people. The complex patterns are of inheritance and only very few ladies in a village possess those inherited talents. The Wosera people are the only tribe that maintains the originalities of the bilum patterns and treasures the complexity of their inherited patterns and its the only significance of that area.
The bilum concept has spread quite quickly down to the coast and then up to the Highlands in the last decade especially when women in noncircular business identified bilum making as a source of regular income. In the highland region they have extended the bilum concept to make bilumwares especially bilum dresses and skirts. The bilumware is now becoming common during school graduation dressings. Bilumware is now marketable to Papua New Guinea citizens living overseas.

VEGETABLE VENDOR AT THE MARKET

VEGETABLE VENDOR AT THE MARKET

VENDOR WITH HER SON AT THE MARKET

VENDOR WITH HER SON AT THE MARKET

VENDOR SELLING BANANAS AND ORANGES

VENDOR SELLING BANANAS AND ORANGES

VENDOR SELLIN SUGAR CANE AND APPLES

VENDOR SELLING SUGAR CANE AND APPLES

VENDOR SELLING CUCUMBERS AND OTHER VEGETABLES

VENDOR SELLING CUCUMBERS AND OTHER VEGETABLES

FRESH TOMATOES AT THE MARKET

FRESH TOMATOES AT THE MARKET

VENDORS AT THE MARKET WITH POTATOES AND OTHER VEGETABLES

VENDORS AT THE MARKET WITH POTATOES AND OTHER VEGETABLES

VENDOR WITH FRUIT AND VEGETABLES

VENDOR WITH FRUIT AND VEGETABLES

VENDOR WITH TAPIOCA WRAPPED IN BANANA LEAF

VENDOR WITH TAPIOCA WRAPPED IN BANANA LEAF

VENDOR SELLINH MADANG IMPRINTED SHOPPING BAGS

VENDOR SELLING MADANG IMPRINTED SHOPPING BAGS

TWO WOMEN ENJOYING A COOL DRINK AT THE MARKET

TWO WOMEN ENJOYING A COOL DRINK AT THE MARKET

MEMORIAL LUTHERAN CHURCH MADANG TOWN

MEMORIAL LUTHERAN CHURCH MADANG TOWN

IN MADANG ALONG THE SHORES OF THE SEPIK RIVER THERE IS AN AFTERNOON MARKET WHERE PEOPLE ARE SELLING FOOD AND BETEL NUTS

THESE WOMEN ARE SELLING FRIED FISH AND FRUIT

THESE WOMEN ARE SELLING FRIED FISH AND FRUIT

FOOD VENDORS ALONG THE SEPIK RIVER IN MADANG

FOOD VENDORS ALONG THE SEPIK RIVER IN MADANG

FOOD VENDOR WITH HER BABY

FOOD VENDOR WITH HER BABY

BETEL NUTS ARE ALWAYS AVAILABLE WHERE EVER YOU GO IN NEW GUINEA

BETEL NUTS ARE ALWAYS AVAILABLE WHERE EVER YOU GO IN NEW GUINEA

AN INTRICATELY CARVED CROCODILE FOR SALE NEAR THE MADANG COUNTRY CLUB

AN INTRICATELY CARVED CROCODILE FOR SALE NEAR THE MADANG COUNTRY CLUB

VIDEOS

CULTURAL DANCE PERFORMED AT THE MADANG WHARF PAPUA NEW GUINEA.Madang is one of 20 provinces in Papua New Guinea and is situated along its northern coast. The capital of this province is a town of the same name — Ma dang.Although small, with only 365,000 inhabitants, the town has modern urban facilities like grocery stores, hotels, tourist shops, bustling arts and crafts street markets and festivals.

——————-

CULTURAL DANCE PERFORMED AT

BILBIL VILLAGE, MADANG,  PAPUA NEW GUINEA

The people of Bilbil Village that we visited used to live on an island offshore from Madang (on the mainland) trading clay pots all along the coast from Kar Kar island to Western Morobe.
The island could not produce enough food for everyone so trading their pots was essential, and eventually they moved their village to the mainland close to Madang to improve their subsistence levels. They make their pots the traditional way by collecting clay from the bush, mix it with sand and water then let it dry. A few days later it is mixed with water again and left to dry, after which the ladies pull off enough clay and shape the lip of the pot. Then they hollow out the inside with a stone and beat the outside with a flat board. It must then be left to dry again before the final smoothing takes place. Before the pots are fired, red clay is painted on the pots. The firing turns them a glossy red and black when they are pulled out of the fire.

The Bilbil are great seamen and over the centuries have sailed their large 2 masted canoes hundreds of km along the coast trading their clay pots with the villages along the way for food, wooden bowls, pigs and other goods.
In the centre of the village we were seated on wooden benches in the shade to watch the Sing Sing. The performers came from the end of town, with the drums beating, singing and dancing in time to the drum beat. Again their skins were oiled and they were highly decorated with shells and lots of plants and leaves – the women all wearing the traditional grass skirts.

————————————–

Tribe meets white man for the first time

Tribe in Papua New Guinea meets white man for the first time. Filmed in 1976. They have never seen modern civilization, or any modern technology.

PART 1  –  http://youtu.be/5aV_850nzv4

PART 2-  http://www.youtube.com/watch?annotation_id=annotation_349949&feature=iv&src_vid=5aV_850nzv4&v=yHjYxgvnMEE

PART 3   http://www.youtube.com/watch?annotation_id=annotation_349949&feature=iv&src_vid=5aV_850nzv4&v=yHjYxgvnMEE

 
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