Skip to content

INDIA NORTH TO SOUTH – NEW DELHI – (A POEM, PHOTOS AND SOME VIDEOS)

April 24, 2012

NEW DELHI

I Love Delhi: A Poem

This rhyming poem on Delhi was written for Hindustan Times ‘I Love Delhi’ contest in mid January 2007. HT did not declare any prizes (writing, painting or any other category) and kept quiet about it!

This is to tell you about Delhi city
the sum and substance, the real nitty-gritty.
And of course you’ll know why I love Delhi
despite the incivility, chaos and melee.

I’ll provide some glimpses – a poetic interlude
of Delhi’s loveliness, resilience, vicissitudes.
Naturally there’ll be some incidental fun
I speak my mind and will stick to my guns.

When you are new to this city
you dislike its crippled ability.
But when you spend some time around
It grows on you and love is found.

So, welcome to Delhi – City of your dreams
Elegant Cultured Classic Supreme.
A consummate city, indeed a decent place
Do fall in love. Hug it. Embrace.

Everyone in Delhi feels at home
Biharis, Malayalis or those from Asom.
It’s a city of the world, a true cosmopolitan
with a topping of excitement, thrill and fun!

Art, architecture, history, heritage ample
Lal Qila, Qutub Minar or the Lotus temple.
India gate for picnic or demonstration
and Rajghat for father of the nation.

It is modern Delhi with a traditional Delhi
the Lutyen’s Delhi with the old havelis.
Delhi is India typified – unity in diversity
which is so becoming for a capital city!

Dhabas, restaurants serving Mughalai, Tandoori
global cuisine or Paranthas, Bhel-Puri!
For shoppers too, Delhi is paradise
indeed for everyone – rich or otherwise!

Delhi’s lifeline are the Blue lines
which move as if running on wine!
Without a care, filled to the hilt
rude and rudderless, without any guilt!

And some DTC drivers’ motoring skills
rest on the Blue lines greasing their wheels!
And except the ‘meter’ all is fine with the auto
‘Athithi Devo Bhava’ was the ancient motto!

Live beam promised as you drop a hat
and on occasions like sealing and VAT.
Blame the government or curse the UPSC
for all your problems and of course secrecy!

Go to Jantar Mantar to air your grievances
or ride Sreedharan’s Metro making advances!
Join the opposition in blaming Shiela Dixit
Or join ‘Bhagidari’ if you want to fix it!

Delhi has a nonagenarian Khuswant Singh
who adds to it, some oomph and zing!
Of course with malice towards one and all
wine, women, uncensored, having a ball!

Delhi has so many party animals
the page three haute coutured nocturnals!
Few things here are beyond the pale
excluding Rohit Bal kissing another male!

Money and muscle were already involved
to top it all, devil’s advocate was called!
Amidst witnesses who fell like ninepins
Brave Bina Ramani spilled the beans!

To a chicken-hearted Munshi, Hindi was Greek
but it has boomeranged, so to speak!
And the city wants a Bharti to have her own mind
for ‘love is not love that alters when it alteration finds!’

And Delhi Police is not the ‘villain in uniform’
please recall how it took Hansie by storm!
If you ignore Jessica et al., corruption and bombs
the pot-bellied cops actually work with aplomb!

And IPS Kiran Bedi did so well
to give this city, India’s best jail.
Delhi Police buries its head in the sand
when she is at the helm, she will reprimand.

And came terror, bombs, high water or hail
the spirit of Diwali did prevail!
Forty thousand wedlocked in ‘one’ day!
‘Dilli Dilwalon ki,’ did you say?

So a city is not merely jungle – concrete
industries, flyovers or tree-lined streets!
When we delve deep the layers should unfold
and it must reveal a heart of gold.

Two arch-rivals who fought so wild
will soon have ‘metro now’ – their love child!
From daggers drawn to hand in glove
Pigs might fly when push comes to shove!

Schools, colleges, universities, institutions
Delhi is a mecca of education!
And Delhi’s child became the father of man
the day an MMS wildfire ran!

And for many, ‘call centres’ is a pet hate
thank God Delhi is not ‘the nanny state’!
And Delhi’s youth want to change the world
while Delhi’s old want to change the youth!

Yamuna is a river only in name
pollution, traffic, population – so untamed!
All the same Delhi is so green
with a CNG fleet and regulated polythene.

When variety is the spice of life
Delhi is the city for that ‘spiced up’ life!
it’s rich and variegated in every sphere
you just name it and it is there!

Yet, once in a blue moon, you may feel pity –
‘Delhi is a wilderness… God help this city!’
Powerless, waterless… Myriad woes
if only there were no thorns with the rose!

So I do understand Delhi is not heaven
neither the wonders – any of those seven
But that does not badly reflect
well I’m sorry – but nobody’s perfect!

One day the doctors may suggest this cure –
‘a week in Delhi, the remedy for sure!’
Surrender to this city making overtures
‘and there is no remedy for love but to love more!’

If I open my heart and lay bare
‘I love Delhi’ is inscribed everywhere!
‘The world is the body, Delhi is its soul’
Mirza Ghalib did rightly extol!

——————————————

NEW DELHI

A vibrant melting pot, you’ll hear a jumble of vernaculars spoken in Delhi, the most common being Hindi, English, Punjabi and Urdu. In terms of its layout, Delhi encapsulates two very different worlds, the ‘old’ and the ‘new’, each presenting deliciously different experiences.

New Delhi is the capital of the Republic of India and the seat of government of the National Capital Territory of Delhi. It constitutes an urban area distinct from but contiguous with the walled Mughal city of Delhi (sometimes referred to as Old Delhi or Shahjahanabad) and forms a significant part of the larger Delhi metropolitan area. The Yamuna River, which has sustained Delhi’s various incarnations since pre-historic times, touches the eastern edge of New Delhi.

The British Government of India decided to transfer its capital from Calcutta to Delhi in 1912. Many factors contributed to this decision. The controversial partitioning of Bengal in 1905 had resulted in the disenfranchisement of Bengali Hindus and Muslims, and many in the Viceroy’s office believed that the communal tension would lead to unrest of a nationalistic (anti-British) tenor. Delhi’s geographic position at the center of Northern India (roughly equidistant from Bombay and Calcutta), its historic importance (for Muslims as an important seat of the Mughal Empire and for Hindus as the fabled Mahabharata-era city of Indraprashta), and the perceived political need to re-articulate British power convinced the Viceroy to make the change. Once Delhi was selected, the India Office convened a committee of experts, the Delhi Town Planning committee, which eventually included the achitects Sir Edwin Lutyens and Herbert Baker, and the engineer John A. Brodie. (Sir Patrick Geddes – widely considered the intellectual father of ‘regionalism’ within urban planning theory and practice – suggested himself for a post; his offer was declined).

Once the city and the committee were chosen, an exact site had to be identified. Lutyens argued for a site south of Shah Jahan’s seventeenth century Mughal capital, on a low hill close to the village of Raisina. In a letter to the Committee, Lutyens confirmed the site’s favorable “aspect, altitude, water, health, virgin soil, [and] views across old Delhi to the wilderness of ruined tombs that form the remains of the seven older Delhis.” After some initial disagreement, he was successful in convincing the others.

The siting of the new city assumed a growth pattern in all directions. Unlike in Bombay or Calcutta, whose physical geographies delimited urban growth, the wide expanse of developable land on all sides was considered a significant advantage. The site’s spaciousness, combined with the prevailing design ethos of the day, lent itself to a decidedly suburban character: New Delhi was planned as a Beaux Arts-style Garden City, replete with extremely large building plots and wide boulevards arranged in monumental symmetry. Supposedly modeled on the Royal Crescent in Bath, England, Connaught Place remains the central business district of New Delhi and the geometric origin of a street layout that maintains powerful visual links between New Delhi and Shahjahanabad. Radial roads connect the Connaught Circus to the old city’s southwestern Ajmer Gate, for example. But the axial vistas also relate the new buildings of the colonial infrastructure to existing monuments that lay outside Shahjahanabad’s gates. Lutyen’s grandiose Government House (Rashtrapati Bhawan) is located on Raisina Hill, and one of New Delhi’s major thoroughfares.

By the time Lutyen’s city was finished in 1931, India’s independence, in some form or another, was imminent. The upheaval that accompanied Partition in 1947 included a massive evacuation of Delhi’s Muslims and an even larger influx of Hindus and Sikhs. But local governance in the city did not keep pace with the rapid changes in federal governance or demographics. (A Master Plan for Delhi was not presented until 1956.) In the absence of a clear governmental infrastructure to handle the repercussions of Partition, monuments played an important role: the Purana Qil’a, for example, housed Muslim refugees until they could make safe passage to Pakistan.

The heart of New Delhi, as many downtowns in India, experienced a burst of utilitarian high-rise construction in the 60s and 70s. Nonetheless, Connaught Place continues to resemble many central business districts inspired by the Garden City model in its single-use, automobile-oriented, non-residential character. Outside the central circus, many of the original colonial buildings remain, as well as large pockets of Public Works Department bungalows from the 1930s. New Delhi has not been immune from the massive population explosion that has caused Greater Delhi to become one of the largest cities in the world, but its separate urban history and the responsibilities of being the capital of the world’s largest democracy have resulted in greater planning regulation than elsewhere in the metropolitan area. As Delhi has grown to the south, west and east of New Delhi, the capital area has become the true center of a vast city-region.

Contemporary architecture in New Delhi continues to reinterpret a fabric inherited from multiple empires. Raj Rewal’s Parliament Library, adjacent to Lutyen’s iconic Parliament House, responds to its context by synthesizing Beaux-Arts monumentalism with Mughal symmetry and the mandala-inspired layout of Hindu temple design. Charles Correa’s British Council (1993) is also emblematic of New Delhi’s architectural syncretism: it is set in a series of landscaped gardens and loggias, each symbolic of India’s Hindu, Muslim and European past.

LAXMI NARAYAN TEMPLE

Laxmi Narayan Temple, also known as Birla Mandir, is one of Delhi’s major temples and a major tourist attraction. Built by the industrialst G.D. Birla in 1938, this beautiful temple is located in the west of Connaught Place.

The temple is dedicated to Laxmi (the goddess of prosperity) and Narayana (The preserver). The temple was inaugurated by Mahatma Gandhi on the condition that people of all castes will be allowed to enter the temple.

The one thing that dominates the urbane skyline of Central Delhi is apparently the soaring spire of the Lakshmi Narayan Temple.  The temple enshrines almost all the deities of the Hindu Pantheon, the presiding deity being Narayan (Vishnu, the preserver in Hindu trinity) and his consort Lakshmi, the Goddess of prosperity and good fortune. The revered shrine, nesting in the heart of the city, is as famous for its sanctity as for its architecture. Portraying an alluring blend of cream and red, the sacred shrine also affords a curious medley of Hindu mythology and ancient Indian architecture.

ENTRANCE TO THE LAXMI NARAYAN TEMPLE

India Gate

India Gate ¤ India Gate Delhi – All India War Memorial

India Gate is constructed as a memorial and was built in the memory of 90,00 soldiers who laid down their lives during world war I. Located at Rajpath, India Gate Delhi is 42 m high and is a popular relaxation area during the summer evenings. India Gate also act as popular pinic spot during winter. Also known as the All India War Memorial or the Gate of India, India Gate was designed and constructed by Lutyens. He was the one who is considered the chief proclaimer in designing the New Delhi plans.

¤ India Gate History
The foundation stone was laid by HRH the Duke of Connaught in 1921 and the monument was dedicated to the nation 10 years later by the then Viceroy, Lord Irwin. Another memorial, Amar Jawan Jyoti was added much later after India had said goodbye to its imperial rulers. It is in the form of a flame that burns day and night under the arch to remind the nation of soldiers who perished in the Indo-Pakistan War of December 1971.

The entire arch stands on a low base of red Bharatpur stone and rises in stages to a huge cornice, beneath which are inscribed Imperial suns. Above on both sides is inscribed INDIA, flanked by MCM and to the right, XIX. The shallow domed bowl at the top was intended to be filled with burning oil on anniversaries but this is rarely done.

NEW DELHI INDIA GATE

INDIAN TOURIST AND GUIDES AT THE NEW DELHI INDIA GATE

THE TOMB OF THE UNKNOWN SOLDIER AT THE NEW DELHI

THE ETERNAL FLAME AT THE TOMB OF THE UNKNOWN SOLDIER AT THE NEW DELHI

Standing behind the gate is an empty canopy made out of sandstone, also designed by Lutyens, and inspired by a 18th century Mahabalipuram pavilion. Until the Independence of India in 1947 it contained the statue of King George V which now stands in the Coronation Park, Delhi. There have been a number of plans and calls to have a seated or standing statue of Mahatma Gandhi installed here, which were subject to debate and have not been agreed upon.

FOOD VENDOR AT THE INDIA GATE

ICE CREAM VENDOR AT THE INDIA GATE

VENDOR AT THE INDIA GATE

NEW DELHI PARLIAMENT

INDIRA GANDHI MEMORIAL MUSEUM

[image]The Indira Gandhi Memorial Museum is located in New Delhi at 1 Safdarjung Road in the home where she lived. The house stands in a lovely garden with mature trees and flowering plants. It contains a collection of photographs documenting her life from her childhood to her days as prime minister. In addition, a number of rooms have been dedicated to her son Rajiv Gandhi who was assassinated in May 1991. Her library and living room have been maintained just as she kept them. These rooms are not open to the public. However,
they can be viewed through the windows from the garden

INDIRA GANDHI MEMORIAL MUSEUM

INDIRA GANDHI’S DRESSING ROOM

INDIRA GANDHI’S OFFICE

INDIRA GANDHI WOULD RECEIVE VISITORS HERE IN HER HOME

INDIRA GANDHI’S DINING ROOM

Qutb Minar and its Monuments, Delhi

Brief Description

Built in the early 13th century a few kilometres south of Delhi, the red sandstone tower of Qutb Minar is 72.5 m high, tapering from 2.75 m in diameter at its peak to 14.32 m at its base, and alternating angular and rounded flutings. The surrounding archaeological area contains funerary buildings, notably the magnificent Alai-Darwaza Gate, the masterpiece of Indo-Muslim art (built in 1311), and two mosques, including the Quwwatu’l-Islam, the oldest in northern India, built of materials reused from some 20 Brahman temples.

In addition to the most famous monument in the complex, Qutub Minar, other important buildings and structures stand in the complex, including the Quwwat-ul-Islam mosque, the Ala-I-Darwaza, the Alai Minar, and the Iron Pillar. Twenty-seven previous Jain temples had been destroyed and their materials reused to construct the minar and other monuments of the complex

SIGN AT THE QUTB MINAR COMPLEX

QUTB MINAR — Qutab Minar, the tallest brick minaret in the world, stands 72.5 meters.

QUTB MINAR (DETAIL AT THE TOP)

QUTB MINAR – (DETAIL)

QUTB MINAR – (DETAIL)

Corbelled arched screen, Quwwat ul-Islam mosque, Qutub Minar complex,

Ashoka Pillar, an iron pillar at the Qutab Minar

Ashoka Pillar, an iron pillar at the Qutab Minar (DETail)

QUTB MINAR – REMAINS OF THE OLD MOSQUE

The intricately carved tomb of Iltutmish celebrates the man who completed the minaret while the later tomb of Imam Zamin boasts the typical Islamic window screens.

The intricately carved tomb of Iltutmish celebrates the man who completed the minaret while the later tomb of Imam Zamin boasts the typical Islamic window screens.

While architecturally striking with ornate inscriptions, the remainder of the complex is a slightly rambling collection of monuments, buildings and tombs including India’s oldest mosque. While many reminders of the Hindu faith abound (such as the squared pillars and images of the various Hindu gods), the builders managed to erase many of the Hindu images in the mosques.

CARVED COLUMNS

CARVED COLUMNS

Tomb of Iman Zamin Qutb Minar Complex

PRAYERS AT THE QUTB MINAR COMPLEX

PRAYERS AT THE MOSQUE

BAHAI HOUSE OF WORSHIP  OR LOTUS TEMPLE, NEW DELHI

Spectacular against the pink of the morning or evening sky, or the dark blue of night, the Bahai House of Worship or Lotus Temple, New Delhi, rises like an offering to the heavens. It is the first Baha-i temple in Asia, and a monument to Baha-ullah, the founder of the faith of the Baha”s.
The temple has the unique structure of a half-blown lotus. The petals consist of three folds of nine concrete portals, each covered outside with marble from Greece, finished in Europe.
From the ground, the temple is 35 m high. It was constructed between 1980 and 1986 at a cost of Rs 10 crores on a 10 hectare plot. A well-kept lawn with neatly marked pathway leads to the temple, which is atop a flight of stairs. Round the base of the temple there is an artificial pool, and a counter where souvenirs and Baha-i literature are sold. There are chambers for meditation and documentary film shows on the Baha”i faith and the various Baha”i temples across the world. The actual temple contains no idols or carvings or paintings, but only seating arrangements before a pulpit or desk. Volunteers help maintain strict silence, and the beauty of the place of worship itself instils peace into the mind.

DELHI METRO RAIL PROJECT   URBAN TRANSPORTATION IN DELHI

The Delhi Metro is a rapid transit system serving Delhi.It is one of the largest metro networks in the world. The network consists of six lines.

The Delhi Metro Rail Corporation has been certified by the United Nations as the first metro rail and rail-based system in the world to get “carbon credits for reducing greenhouse gas emissions” and helping in reducing pollution levels in the city by 630,000 tons (630 Gg) every year.

DELHI METRO STATION AT KAROL BAGH STATION

DELHI METRO TICKET COUNTER

DELHI METRO PASSENGERS IN OLD DELHI

Jama Masjid

Jama Masjid, DelhiJama Masjid of Delhi is the largest mosque in India. The Jama Masjid stands across the road in front of the Red Fort. Built between 1644 and 1658, Jama Masjid is one of the last architectural works of the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan. The spacious courtyard of the Jama Masjid holds thousands of faithful. Jama Masjid is located on a mound in the heart of the old city and projects beautifully into the Old-Delhi skyline. Jama Masjid Mosque was built in red sandstone and marble by more than 5000 artisans. Originally called the Masjid-i-Jahan-Numa, or “mosque commanding view of the world”, the Jama Masjid stands at the center of the erstwhile capital city of the Mughals, Shahjahanbad.The Jama Masjid was completed under the supervision of Saadullah Khan, the Prime Minister of Shah Jahan. A sum of Rs 10 lakhs was spent on the construction of the Jama Masjid. The Jama Masjid is built on a red sandstone porch, about 30 feet (10 m) from the level of the ground and is about 1400 square yards (1200 m²) in extent. The Jama Masjid has three gateways, four towers and two minarets. The gateways in the north and south are led by a fleet of steps. The main entrance is on the eastern side facing the red fort. It was probably used by the emperors. The tower of the Jama Masjid is made up of five distinctive storeys. Each one of the storeys has a projecting balcony. The adjoining edifices are beautifully done with calligraphy.The first three storeys of the Jama Masjid tower are made of red sandstone and the fourth one is made of marble, while the fifth is made of sandstone. The Jama Masjid is covered with intricate carvings and has verses inscribed from the holy Koran. The grand Red fort (Lal Qila) stands on the eastern side of the Jama Masjid. The main prayer hall of the Jama Masjid is made up of high cusped arches and marble domes. The cabinet in the north gate of the Jama Masjid contains a collection of Muhammad’s relics – the Koran written on deerskin, a red beard-hair of the prophet, his sandals and his footprints, implanted in a marble block.

JAMA MASJID AS FROM THE STREET BELOW

JAMA MASJID

JAMA MASJID ENTRANCE AND COURTYARD

JAMA MASJOD ENTRANCE AND COURTYARD

WORSHIPPERS AT THE JAMA MASJID

ON THE WAY TO PRAYERS AT THE JAMA MASJID

JAMA MASJID

PRAYER HALL JAMA MASJID

EAST GATE JAMA MASJID

JAMA MASJID INTERIOR

JAMA MASJID COURTYARD

JAMA MASJID

JAMA MASJID MINARET

ENTRANCE TO JAMA MASJID MOSQUE

STREET BELOW APPROACHING THE JAMA MASJID

BEDDING STORE NEAR THE JAMA MASJID – OLD DELHI

TOY STORE OLD DELHI

OLD DELHI

NARROW STREET OF OLD DELHI

OLD DELHI SIDE STREET WHERE WEALTHY MERCHANTS LIVE

OLD DELHI SIDE STREET WHERE WEALTHY MERCHANTS LIVE  (DETAIL)

OLD DELHI VEGETABLE MARKET

OLD DELHI VENDOR VEGETABLE MARKET

RESTAURANT OLD DELHI

STORE SELLING BISCUITS OLD DELHI

STREET VENDOR SELLING WATCHES – OLD DELHI

BUSY STREETS NEAR THE GURUDWARA BANGLA SAHIB (LARGEST SIKH TEMPLE IN NEW DELHI)

—————————————————

Bangla Sahib Gurudwara(Sikh Temple)

Gurudwara Bangla Sahib is one of the most popular place of worship in Delhi. Its gold-plated dome and white facade towers above Bangla Sahib road effortlessly. On holidays especially, this place is packed with people of all religions and denominations. The gurudwara is built on the site of a house where Guru Harkishen Dev, the eight guru of the Sikhs, had stayed when he visited Delhi in 1664. The tank, which you can still see in the compound was apparently blessed by the Guru himself and can cure people of small pox and cholera. Enthusiasts of Sikh history can visit the Baba Baghel Singh Museum within the gurudwara complex.

Description

Gurdwara also has a sarovar or a holy pond, where people take holy dip and pray to the Guru. Delhi Sikh Gurdwara Management Committee celebrates the birth of Guru Sri Harkrishan Sahib with great reverence. Death anniversary of Maharaja Ranjit Singh Ji is also celebrated over here. On the east side of the main Gurdwara in the complex is the ‘Langar’ (community kitchen) Hall, where free food is served to all devotees with no distinction of caste, creed or status.
As in all Sikh places of worship, visitors of all religions irrespective of their cast, colour or creed are welcome. Visitors can deposit shoes, collect brochures, and enlist the services of a free guide at the information centre near the main entrance. To go into the main complex, one need’s to cover one’s head and wear conservative clothes that cover legs and shoulders.

Legend Of Bangla Sahib

Bangla Sahib Gurdwara Panorama


When Guru Sahib was called to Delhi by Aurangzeb on the behest of his brother Ram Rai, he was entertained royally and hosted by Mirza Raja Jai Singh who made arrangements of the Guru’s stay at Delhi in his own palace. Diwan Dargah Mull, Bhai Gurditta Ji, Bhai Mati Das Ji and the mother of the Guru Ji had accompanied him. Raja Jai Singh dedicated this palace in the memory of the Guru Sahib, which is today famous as Gurdwara Bangla Sahib.

About Bangla Sahib it is also said that sixth Guru Sri Hargobind Sahib after getting released the 52 kings from the Gwalior fort had stayed here on his arrival in Delhi.

WORSHIPPERS IN THE BANGLA SAHIB GURDWARA (SIKG TEMPLE)

WORSHIPPERS IN THE BANGLA SAHIB GURDWARA (SIKG TEMPLE)

MUSICIANS IN THE BANGLA SAHIB GURDWARA (SIKG TEMPLE)

VOULUNTEER IN THE KITCHEN HELPING TO FEED 10,000 PEOPLE A DAY AT THE BANGLA SAHIB GURDWARA (SIKG TEMPLE)

KITCHEN IN THE BANGLA SAHIB GURDWARA (SIKG TEMPLE)

PREPARING FOR LUNCH IN THE BANGLA SAHIB GURDWARA (SIKG TEMPLE)

MAKING NAAN (BREAD) FOR LUNCH IN THE BANGLA SAHIB GURDWARA (SIKG TEMPLE)

WOMEN VOLUNTEERS INE THE KITCHEN AT THE BANGLA SAHIB GURDWARA (SIKG TEMPLE)

VOLUNTEERS WASHING PLATES FOR LUNCH N THE BANGLA SAHIB GURDWARA (SIKG TEMPLE)

Click for

LIVE, SHABAD, KIRTAN,from GOLDEN TEMPLE BY BHAI SUKHBIR SINGH HAZOORI RAGI SRI DARBAR

 

 

———————————–

 

India Old Delhi

http://youtu.be/nnMlQYazCOc

Daily Life in Old Delhi

 

 

————————————–

New Delhi

http://youtu.be/G1Wv8bRhwqg
See a speeded up film of the Main Bazaar (Pahaganj) and uptown shopping area (Connaught Place) From inside a rickshaw, from on the street and from the 24th floor of the revolving restaurant, see New Delhi.
Features great footage of The Subjee Market, an elephant on the street, and much more.

 

 

——————————————

FOR THOSE OF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN THE DELHI METRO

24 hours with Delhi Metro (Discovery) Part 1.flv

http://youtu.be/HqryNjPTDyY

 

24 hours with Delhi Metro (Discovery) Part 2.flv

http://youtu.be/zt4LLDg5tX8

24 hours with Delhi Metro (Discovery) Part 3

http://youtu.be/dTbPT3AvnxQ

24 hours with Delhi Metro (Discovery) Part 4.flv

http://youtu.be/8tjKiuIu-tM

24 hours with Delhi Metro (Discovery) Part 5.flv

 

—————————-

 

 

 

 

 


2 Comments leave one →
  1. May 16, 2012 10:41 am

    Lenny, you’ve outdone your previous best work. Fabulous!
    Carol

  2. August 12, 2014 8:11 am

    Hello! I could have sworn I’ve been to this site before but after
    browsing through some of the post I realized it’s new to me.
    Anyhow, I’m definitely happy I found it and I’ll be bookmarking and checking back frequently!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: