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BERMUDA JUNE 5 – 7 2011 NEW PHOTOGRAPHS

July 15, 2011

 

BERMUDA  (APoem)
A. Keith Barton

Her majesty of beauty in an ocean motif
Elongated like a scorpion with many a reef
Roofs capture rainwater for personal use
Stucco cottages with magnificent colors profuse
A people who call with a touch of their horns
Navigate winding roads amidst the onions and corn

Islands where commerce and tourism meet
Hamilton signifies the government’s seat
British Bobbies in Bermuda shorts
Divert traffic around circles for fun and sport
Horseshoe Bay with fine pink sand
Sequester lovers who walk in hand

Soccer and cricket are sporting events
A national pastime from work prevents
Motor scooters comb hidden shops
Hibiscus and daffodils hide birds of a flock
White water cascades over the rocks below
Heaven and time caught in their flow

Southampton Parish boasts the world’s smallest drawbridge
While St. George on the North End caters to wines vintage
The Dockyard on the South End speaks of Davy Jones
A prison once held the skull and bones
This island paradise we call Bermuda
Replete with sharks and barracuda

 

Bermuda is a British overseas territory in the North Atlantic Ocean. Located off the east coast of the United States, its nearest landmass is Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, about 1,030 kilometres (640 mi) to the west-northwest. It is about 1,373 kilometres (853 mi) south of Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, and 1,770 kilometres (1,100 mi) northeast of Miami, Florida. Its capital city is Hamilton.

Bermuda was discovered in 1505 by Spanish navigator Juan de Bermúdez (who claimed to find the island inhabited only by pigs) after whom the islands are named, who claimed it for the Spanish Empire. Unoccupied, the island was settled by England in 1609, making it the oldest and most populous remaining British overseas territory. Its first capital, St George’s, was established in 1612 and is the oldest continuously inhabited English town in the Americas.[3]

Bermuda has an affluent economy, with off-shore finance as its largest sector followed by tourism [3][4]. In 2005, Bermuda was once even claimed to have the world’s highest GDP per capita, yet these statistics are hard to verify as Bermuda is not classified as a country but rather as a territory of the U.K. It has a subtropical climate.[5] Bermuda makes up the easternmost point of the so-called “Bermuda Triangle,” a region of sea in which a number of aircraft and surface vessels have allegedly disappeared under mysterious circumstances.

In the early 20th century, as modern transport and communication systems developed, Bermuda became a popular destination for wealthy American, Canadian and British tourists arriving by frequent steamship service. In addition, the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act enacted by the United States against its trading partners in 1930, cut off Bermuda’s once-thriving agricultural export trade (primarily lilies and fresh vegetables to the U.S.), spurring the overseas territory to develop its tourist industry.

Bermuda mid-1920s

After several failed attempts, in 1930 the first aeroplane reached Bermuda. A Stinson Detroiter seaplane flying from New York, it had to land in the ocean once because of darkness and then again to refuel. Navigation and weather forecasting improved in 1933 when the Royal Air Force established a station at Bermuda and operated float planes from the harbour in coordination with the British fleet. In 1936 Luft Hansa began to experiment with seaplane flights from Berlin via the Azores with continuation to New York City.[11] In the late 1930s, Imperial Airways and Pan American World Airways began operating scheduled flying-boat airline services from New York and Baltimore to Darrell’s Island, Bermuda. In 1948, regularly scheduled commercial airline service by land-based aeroplanes began to Kindley Field (now Bermuda International Airport), helping tourism to reach its peak in the 1960s–1970s. By the end of the 20th century, international business had supplanted tourism as the dominant sector of Bermuda’s economy (see Economy of Bermuda).

The Royal Naval Dockyard, and the attendant military garrison continued to be an important component of Bermuda’s economy until the mid-20th century. In addition to considerable building work, the armed forces needed to source food and other materials from local vendors. Beginning in World War II, U.S. military installations also were located in Bermuda (see “Military” section, below, and Military of Bermuda).

Universal adult suffrage and the development of a two-party political system occurred in the 1960s. Before universal suffrage, adopted as part of Bermuda’s Constitution in 1967, voting was based on property ownership (see “Politics” section, below, and Politics of Bermuda). On 10 March 1973, then-Governor of Bermuda Richard Sharples was assassinated by local Black Power militants during a period of civil unrest in the 1970s.



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