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CHRISTMAS IN PYRMONT – SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – NOVEMBER 29, 2015 – A STREET FAIR IN PICTURES

November 29, 2015

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Now in its third year and gaining in support from the local community and neighbouring villages. It takes over a square in the Pyrmont. It is filled with entertainment, children’s activities, stalls and food, and a visit from Santa.

Christmas in Pyrmont takes place once a year to raise funds for local charities.

Here are a few photos of this event:

 

 

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A CRUISE TO COLONIAL FIJI, THE MAMANUKU AND YASAWA ISLANDS

January 26, 2018

COLONIAL FIJI

A visit to the world heritage listed Levuka on the island of Ovalau.

Makogai Island and a walking tour of Makogai leper colony and nursery, home to giant clams and turtles.

Savusavu is the next stop on the island of Vanua Levu, with its hot springs, pearl farms and thriving markets, all perched on an extinct volcanic crater.

Bouma Waterfall National Park on the garden island of Taveuni.

Viti Levu, for some excellent snorkelling, a great hike to admire the amazing Bligh Water and a traditional Island Night, featuring kava, meke and a lovo feast.

 

LEVUKA

Levuka – Fiji’s first capital

Levuka is a trip back in time. It’s a visit to a Fiji that is still untouched by mass tourism and much of the over commercialized world. Life here is slow and runs on “Fiji Time”.  It is Fiji as used it used to be in the old days.

In June 2013, Levuka was declared a Unesco world heritage site for being “an outstanding example of late 19th century Pacific port settlements, reflects the integration of local building traditions by a supreme naval power, leading to the emergence of a unique landscape“.Founded by traders and settlers as early as 1830, Levuka was the first permanent European settlement in the pacific islands. the place flourished and attracted cotton and coconut planters, sandalwood and beche de mer traders. Merchants arrived to set up shops, bars and hotels. Ships and sailors visited and Levuka turned into a rowdy place. Local chiefs had trouble to maintain control. In 1874 the king of Fiji “Tui Cakobau” and his fellow chiefs ceded the islands to the queen and Fiji became a British colony on 10 October 1874 and Levuka became Fijis’ first capital. Law and order took over and very soon the first school of Fiji was builtA few years later, lack of space hindered the further economic growth of Levuka. A new capital was needed. So in 1882 the capital was officially moved to  Suva, businesses and many people left the old capital and Levuka seemed to be doomed to stand still in time.

Marist priests, led by Father Breheret, established a mission in Levuka in 1858. By 1870, the town had a population of more than 800. When the first modern nation state of Fiji was founded in 1871, Seru Epenisa Cakobau was crowned King at Levuka. After Fiji was annexed as a British colony in 1874, Levuka remained the capital until 1877, when the administration was moved to  Suva, although the move was not made official until 1882. The move was prompted by concerns that the 600-meter high hills, many with cliffs, surrounding Levuka gave it no room for expansion. today is the principal town in the Lomaiviti group (Central Fiji).

Levuka’s status as a stopover port for ocean vessels crossing the Pacific came to an end in the 1950s, threatening the town with economic extinction. In 1964, however, the Pacific Fishing Company (PAFCO) was founded by a Japanese firm, specialising in freezing and shipping canned tuna, mostly to markets in Europe and Canada. A cannery, a joint PAFCO-government venture, was opened in 1976, and is the largest private employer on the island of Ovalau. Owing largely to Levuka’s isolation, tourism plays only a minor role in the Levuka/Ovalau economy.It has infrastructure including supermarkets and grocery stores stocked with “European” foods as well as beer, wines and spirits. There are bakeries, hardware & appliance stores.
Local market vendors selling vegetable, fruit and fish.

Cinema, clubs, café and restaurants, churches, schools, museum, library, local government, post office, document and freight couriers, internet access, banks, police force, customs & immigration and a new modern hospital. Accommodations, tours and activities, daily ferry and flight services.

Ovalau Island
Ovalau is a lush volcanic island of approximately 110 square kilometers in size. The island’s rugged topography is covered by tropical jungle, the highest mountain “Nadelaiovalau”, has an altitude of 625 meters. Ovalau is the sixth largest island in Fiji and the main island of the Lomaiviti Province.  On the islands are 23 villages and one town, Levuka, Fiji’s former capital. The island’s population is around 9000 of which nearly 25% reside in Levuka. Levuka is located 22 kilometers from the island’s airport, Bureta. The vast majority are indigenous Fiji Islanders, with part-Europeans, Chinese, Indian, Rotuman, Solomon Islanders, Gilbertese, and many others representing the balance.

Fiji became independent in 1970, after nearly a century as a British colony. Democratic rule was interrupted by two military coups in 1987, caused by concern over a government perceived as dominated by the Indian community (descendants of contract laborers brought to the islands by the British in the 19th century). A 1990 constitution favored native Melanesian control of Fiji, but led to heavy Indian emigration; the population loss resulted in economic difficulties, but ensured that Melanesians became the majority. Amendments enacted in 1997 made the constitution more equitable. Free and peaceful elections in 1999 resulted in a government led by an Indo-Fijian, but a coup in May 2000 ushered in a prolonged period of political turmoil. Parliamentary elections held in August 2001 provided Fiji with a democratically elected government and gave a mandate to the government of Prime Minister Laisenia QARASE.

Here are some photos of Levuka:

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – AN ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE TAKING OF A CENSUS

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – SACRED HEART PARISH CATHOLIC CHURCH  –  THE CHURCH OF THE SACRED HEART Located in the center of Levuka town on Beach Street, the church represents the oldest known Catholic Mission in Fiji. Built in the 1800s, the building consists of conventional and simple Gothic Revival styled architecture.

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – SACRED HEART PARISH

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – As Levuka is an official Port of Entry, there is a Fiji Immigration office in town. They clear arriving ship or yacht crew as well as handle any other visa and immigration issues. Most Passport holders get on arrival 4 months tourist visa.

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – The Masonic Lodge, Levuka’s only Romanesque building was set on fire during the period of lawlessness and unrest following Fiji’s 2000 coup.There is much controversy about the Masonic fraternity in Fiji, the dominant traditional Christian faiths consider Masons to be devil-worshipers. The Lodge contained priceless historical artefacts and records of Levuka’s history dating back to 1875. The arsonists have yet to be identified and prosecuted.

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – Levuka Town Hall, which houses the Levuka Town Council. It was built in 1898 in honour of Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee.

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – PRIMARY SCHOOL

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – PRIMAARY SCHOOL

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – STORE INTERIOR

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – STORE INTERIOR

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – STORE INTERIOR

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – STORE INTERIOR

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – STORE INTERIOR

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – STORE EXTERIOR

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – A TRADITIONAL HOUSE (BURE)

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – AN ADVERTISEMENT FOR A VETERINARIAN VISIT TO LEVUKA

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – NAVOKA METHODIST CHURCH This quaint little church is located at the bottom of the 199 steps. Built also in the 1860s and featuring beautiful singing from the choir and congregation, the services are usually conducted in English.

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – 199 STEPS There are many old colonial homes on Levuka’s hillsides, and the romantically named 199 Steps of Mission Hill are worth climbing for the fantastic view – although if you count them, you might find there are closer to 185 steps.

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI -Niukaubi Hill is the site of one of Levuka’s two war memorials. (The other is on Beach St, opposite the Sacred Heart Church.) The Supreme court building and parliament house were on Niukaubi Hill. The European War Memorial appears in the forground.

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – DETAIL OF WAE MEMORIAL PLAQUE FROM THE FIRST WORLD WAR

 

 


DELANA METHODIST PRIMARY SCHOOL

Delana is well recorded in Fiji’s history as the first institution to conduct formal education. In 1851, a Methodist missionary, Joseph Waterhouse came to Levuka to start a school.

In the following year, 1852, a schoolmaster from England, John Binner, took over Waterhouse’s school. Binner continued to serve the school and developed it. Eventually it became Delana Methodist School which is situated on Mission Hill. In 1973, the school opened it’s secondary institution. The school moved down to it’s present site in the late 1980’s. Students who enroll at Delana are mostly methodists and at present, it has a roll of 96 students, from classes 1 to 8.

 

Here are photos of the school, it’s students and teachers, as they welcomed us with song and dance:

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – DELANA METHODIST PRIMARY SCHOOL

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – DELANA METHODIST PRIMARY SCHOOL

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – DELANA METHODIST PRIMARY SCHOOL

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – DELANA METHODIST PRIMARY SCHOOL

 

 

 

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI – DELANA METHODIST PRIMARY SCHOOL

 

 

Video: DELANA METHODIST PRIMARY SCHOOL – LEVUKA, FIJI – AUGUST 2 2017

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After The visit to the Delana Methodist Primary School we returned to the Captain Cook cruise ship, and at about 5 PM, as the time the ship was about to depart Levuka, The towns people came to sing a farewell to our group who had visited Levuka.

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

 

 

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LEVUKA, FIJI

VIDEO:  LEVUKA WHARF FIJI – CAPTAIN COOK CRUISE FAREWELL – AUGUST 2 2017



 

MAKOGAI ISLAND

In the heart of the Lomaiviti Group, lies the island of Makogai; not only abundant with biodiversity and beauty, but brimming with South Pacific history. From Leprosy Hospital, 1911-1969 to Government Mariculture Centre 2014.

Throughout Fiji there are many myths and legends associated with so called ‘Leprosy stones’. These are believed to be the gravestones of Fijians who had died of the disease predating the arrival of Europeans and Asians.

Over many years, there was a gradual increasing awareness of the disease, and its contagious nature. Eventually under British rule the Leper Ordinance Act of 1899 was passed to prohibit sufferers from handling food, medicines and tobacco, using public transport, bathing in communal pools and lodging in public houses.

The Makogai Leprosy Hospital was officially opened on the 29th November 1911 when the first twenty patients arrived at the island onboard the Government ketch ‘Ramadi’. Soon patients were arriving from all over the Pacific; countries such as the Solomons, the then named Gilbert and Ellice Islands, Cook Islands, Samoa, and Tonga. Separate villages for ethnic groups were constructed to ‘promote peace and order’ and women were kept separate from the men. In total, over 4000 patients landed on the island.

Initially, the only treatment offered was Chaulmoogra Oil, which was used to dress wounds and given as an intra-dermal injection. While never a cure, it appeared to reduce symptoms. The island was divided in two to prevent the spread of the disease between patients and workers. Even the shoes worn at the patient’s end of the Island were banned at the ‘clean end’ where the doctors and non-infected workers lived.

Finally, in 1948 – almost 40 years after the first patients were admitted, Dapsone, a sulpha drug and a cure against the bacterial cause of leprosy (or Hansen’s Disease, named after the Norwegian physician who identified the causal bacteria Mycobacterium leprae in 1873) was discovered.

During its 58 years as a leprosarium, approximately 2,500 patients were effectively treated and sent back home to their friends and families. Around 500 were repatriated back to their homeland and the remaining 1,241 died due to the direct effects and complications of leprosy. The deaths included a Fijian Sister, Maria Filomena, who had lived on the island for over 30 years as both a worker and patient having contracted the disease. You can visit her grave along with hundreds of others – in the large cemetery that overlooks Dalice Bay.

In 1969, the last patients with Leprosy left Makogai for Fiji’s purpose built Hospital in Suva. With their departure, the days of the Makogai Leprosy Hospital came to an end.

Today, some of the old structures remain as if the Leprosarium was still in operation, while others are mere shells hidden under vines and other foliage. Only the steps of the old hospital show where the central building once stood. The concrete foundations are still intact for 4 dorm blocks believed to have been the Chinese or Indian quarters – these are within walking distance from the hospital site. At the ‘clean’ end of the island, an approximately 20 minutes walk along the coastline, you can wander among the old staff quarters. Today, the houses are home to government Fisheries officers and their families.

It is in this area that you can find what is left of the coconut soap factory, massive engine house, island store and even a bakery. The local school is located here and children play happily under the shade of the mango trees. Ask them to show you some of the old pottery and artefacts they have uncovered over the years. A walk back to where you began, this time taking a detour through the forest, will see you pass the old post office and wireless telephone centre.

In 2011, Makogai officially became a Mariculture Centre. One of the main projects that the team of fisheries officers based here work on, is culturing giant clams (Tridacna). Once in abundance on Fiji’s reefs, many species have been over harvested and current levels are low. The adductor muscle is considered a delicacy and an aphrodisiac in China, which coupled with the harvesting of clams for food, shells and the aquarium trade – it is unsurprising that they have found themselves on the IUCN’s vulnerable list. In the 1980s an Australian-funded project began culturing them at Makogai – and thousands have since been transplanted to various parts of Fiji.

The old hospital beds lined up in the shallows of Dalice Bay are used to protect juvenile clams once they have been transplanted from the onshore breeding facility. Once deemed large enough to fend for themselves, they are available for repopulating other reef areas around Fiji.

The important role that the vasua (clams) play on the coral reef is often overlooked. A single giant clam can filter hundreds of litres of water in a day. As filter feeders, this keystone species offers a great line of defence against an outbreak of pesky crown of thorns starfish by filtering out thousands of their microscopic spawn.

 

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MAKOGAI ISLAND, FIJI

 

 

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MAKOGAI ISLAND, FIJI – THE WHARF WHERE LEPROSY PATIENTS AS THEY CAME ASHORE TO THE HOSPITAL

 

 

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MAKOGAI ISLAND, FIJI

 

 

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MAKOGAI ISLAND, FIJI – A GIFT OF KAVA FOR THE VILLAGE ELDER

 

 

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MAKOGAI ISLAND, FIJI – THE GRAVES OF FORMER PATIENTS.

 

 

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MAKOGAI ISLAND, FIJI – THE GRAVES OF FORMER PATIENTS.

 

 

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MAKOGAI ISLAND, FIJI – THE GRAVE OF MOTHER MARY AGNES – Among the 1241 souls interred on Makogai is Mother Marie Agnes, the kindly Catholic nun who ran the facility with an iron fist for 34 years, when no one else would. Her unlimited capacity for kindness and hope for those with none, was recognised in later life by the British colonial government.

 

 

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MAKOGAI ISLAND, FIJI – CHILDREN PERFORMING FOR THE VISITORS

 

 

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MAKOGAI ISLAND, FIJI

 

 

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MAKOGAI ISLAND, FIJI – AFTER THE PRIMARY SCHOOL PERFORMANCE WE GET TO MEET THE PEOPLE LIVING ON THE ISLAND

 

 

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MAKOGAI ISLAND, FIJI

 

 

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MAKOGAI ISLAND, FIJI

 

 

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MAKOGAI ISLAND, FIJI

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SAVUSAVU

  • Savusavu is located on Fiji’s northern and second largest island of Vanua Levu, 100 miles north-east of Suva. It’s famous for its hot springs, located mostly opposite the Hot Springs Hotel.  At low tide you can see the steam from numerous smaller outlets all along the foreshore.
  • Founded before the signing of the Deed of Cession (10 October 1874, when Fijian chiefs signed the document which making Fiji a British Crown Colony), Savusavu township is on the shores of a large picturesque, deep water harbor
  • It was originally established as a center with the sailing ships plying the coastline for cargoes of sandalwood and beche-de-mer; later it became the center of the cotton boom.  During World War 2 the Americans were looking for a deep water harbour for their navy in the Pacific and Savusavu was under consideration.  The Americans chose American Samoa for their base and today Savusavu is known as the Hidden Paradise as it is virtually unspoilt. Savusavu Bay is amongst the world’s finest natural harbors, and cruise ships visit regularly, yachties (over 300 every years) and divers visit regularly. Today, Savusavu remains much as it did in its “heyday”, the hustle and bustle of progress appears to have passed it by.
  • Savusavu’s economy relies on copra as one of it’s aspects and the township serves an area that constitutes the major coconut producing area of Fiji. (Similar to the Coral Coast resort area on the main island of Fiji).
  • The population of nearly 5000 is a harmonious mix of indigenous Fijians, Indo-Fijians, mixed race (kailoma), and expats (kaivalangi) people.
  • The Hibiscus Highway stretches 70 miles up the coast from Savusavu, offering some of the finest and most unspoiled scenery in the South Pacific, while the trans-insular road across to the main town of Labasa, offers breathtaking views and indigenous rainforest. The atmosphere of the past lingers on everywhere, amongst a natural and friendly population. These roads are some of the best in Fiji.
  • Unusual attractions include the thermal springs at Nakama and the blowholes at Namale.  The Old Copra Shed Marina, which has been renovated in recent years was originally the place where copra was traded and shipped from, as one of the earliest industries in the area along with beche-de-mer and sandlewood. Copra is still processed in the area today.   Today tourism, including diving, sailing and fishing are amongst the current economic drivers in the area. One of the oldest, if not the oldest structures in the area is the Savarekareka Catholic  Mission Chapel, built in 1870 and located 10 kilometres north of Savusavu.
  • The hot springs in Savusavu have been identified as being capable of creating enough geothermal energy to power the entire island of Vanua Levu and a geothermal plant may be on the cards in the future.
  • The majority of the land in Fiji is owned by native land owners – the Mataqali (extended family unit).  Savusavu and surrounding areas however have substantial amounts of freehold land.  Most of this land was previously used as coconut plantations, however in recent times some of it has been subdivided and sold to expats looking for a holiday or retirement home, resulting in an eclectic mix of Americans, Australians, New Zealanders and Europeans, adding to the demographic and economic aspects in the area.

PHOTOS TAKEN WHILE WALKING THROUGH THE TOWN

 

 

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SAVUSAVU, FIJI

 

 

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SAVUSAVU, FIJI

 

 

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SAVUSAVU, FIJI

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SAVUSAVU, FIJI

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SAVUSAVU, FIJI

 

 

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SAVUSAVU, FIJI

 

 

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SAVUSAVU, FIJI

 

 

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SAVUSAVU, FIJI

 

 

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SAVUSAVU, FIJI

 

 

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SAVUSAVU, FIJI

 

 

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SAVUSAVU, FIJI

 

 

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SAVUSAVU, FIJI

 

 

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SAVUSAVU, FIJI

 


J HUNTER PEARL FARM TOUR

An interesting tour of how pearls are produced in Fiji.

Justin Hunter started his company over 10 years ago having studied aquaculture in the United States. On returning home to Savusavu, Justin set about turning his vision into reality – that reality is J. Hunter Pearls. He likes to share, and decided to share his dream with local villagers by creating a working partnership with the Savusavu local community and people of Kioa Island.

At both farm sites, women from the village are contracted to harvest spat collectors (the special ropes that hold young oysters) and tie chaplet ropes used to hold adult oysters on the farms.

J. Hunter also employs and trains villagers to work as farm divers. They are in charge of monitoring and checking the oysters to ensure lines do not get tangled underwater. There is also an oyster cleaning crew, responsible for checking on the health of individual oysters and to gently clean each one to ensure they can feed wel

A tour guide give us peak at the pearl farming process and afterwards, we were able to take a look at the polished and set finished products in the J. Hunter showroom.

 

 

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SAVUSAVU – J HUNTER PEARLS – A POSTER OUTSIDE OF THEIR SHOWROOM

 

 

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SAVUSAVU – J HUNTER PEARLS

 

 

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in the J. Hunter showroom.

 

 

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in the J. Hunter showroom.

 

 

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SAVUSAVU – J HUNTER PEARL SHOWROOM

 

 

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SAVUSAVU – J HUNTER PEARL SHOWROOM


 

BOUMA NATIONAL HERITAGE PARK

This magnificent rainforest park offers superb swimming and hiking, and harbors the mysterious tagimoucia flower, said to grow only here and thrive no place else in the world.
The Bouma National Heritage Park sits on the eastern side of Taveuni Island, which is known as the Garden Island because it does receive frequent rainfall and is quite green.

The Tavoro Waterfalls (also Tavoro Falls as well as the Bouma Waterfalls or Bouma Falls) are a spectacular series of three waterfalls nestled within the Bouma National Heritage Park.

The first waterfall, called the Lower Bouma Falls, is said to be 24m tall and is easily the most popular as it allows swimming. The Middle Bouma Falls is said to drop 15m. Finally, the double-barreled Upper Bouma Falls has the shortest drop of the three at 10m, but it has a serene setting and it seems to be a much more secluded place for a swim to beat the tropical heat.

The top of the mountain at Lake Tagimaucia (pronounced “TANG-ih-mao-thee-uh”), is where the legendary Tagimaucia flower would bloom at specific times of the year. By the way, that flower happens to be the national flower of Fiji.

There are two versions of this legend, the key points of which are the same. In modern times, local legends are sometimes told in a fashion that the story teller thinks will be best received rather than the way it was told in the past.

One story is that a young girl was playing when she was supposed to be doing her chores. Her mother kept reminding her of what needed to be done, but the girl ignored her. The mother became so annoyed that she grabbed a bundle of sasas (mid ribs of coconut fronds), which she had been using as a broom, and spanked the girl with them telling her to get out of their bure (house) and never come back.

The girl was so upset that she ran away. She ran and ran with tears in her eyes. She could not see where she was going and after a long while she encountered a flowerless vine hanging from a tree and became entangled in it. She could not free herself and lay down and fell asleep crying. Her tears turned from salt water to blood and fell on the vine where they turned into beautiful red flowers.

When she awoke she was able to free herself from the vine and ran home. She discovered that her mother had forgotten all about their quarrel and so they lived happily from then on.

The other version I heard was a romantic one and goes like this: Once upon a time, a princess was about to be forced by her father to marry her predestined husband.

However, she was in love with another man and, in desperation, she fled from the village into the mountains and, completely exhausted, she fell asleep on the banks of the lake. While she was sleeping, she cried and in her dream tears trickled down over her cheeks and turned into beautiful red flowers. … And the red flowers engendered the Tagimaucia plant.

Tagimaucia means, “to cry in your sleep”. Tagi=cry, moce=sleep.

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TAGIMOUCIA FLOWER

 

 

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BOUMA WATERFALLS, FIJI

 

 

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BOUMA WATERFALLS, FIJI

 

 

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BOUMA WATERFALLS, FIJI

 

 

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ABOVE THE BOUMA WATERFALLS, FIJI

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AS WE WALKED TO THE BOUMA FALLS WE SAW THIS BEAUTIFUL VEGETATION.

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BOUMA WATERFALLS, FIJI

 

 

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BOUMA WATERFALLS, FIJI

 

 

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BOUMA WATERFALLS, FIJI

 

 

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BOUMA WATERFALLS, FIJI

 

 

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BOUMA WATERFALLS, FIJI

 

 

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BOUMA WATERFALLS, FIJI

 

 

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BOUMA WATERFALLS, FIJI

 

 

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BOUMA WATERFALLS, FIJI

 

 

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BOUMA WATERFALLS, FIJI

 

 

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BOUMA WATERFALLS, FIJI

 

 

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BOUMA WATERFALLS, FIJI

 

 

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BOUMA WATERFALLS, FIJI

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WE RETURNED THAT EVENING TO NASELESELE VILLAGE FOR A LOVO FEAST AND A MEKE

Lovo, the traditional form of cooking, of Fiji. This is the Fijian name for a feast cooked in the earth. The taste is like a barbeque, only a little more smoked, and it’s a very efficient way to cook large quantities of food at the same time.

The first step in preparing a Lovo is heating the rocks which will serve as the base for the lovo.  Specially selected stones are placed in a hot fire and left to absorb the heat. When the rocks are sufficiently heated, they are pulled from the flames and placed in the bottom of a shallow pit.

Next, chicken, fish and pork are tightly wrapped in a weave of palm fronds or banana leaves before being place in the bottom of the lovo pit lined with hot rocks.  On top goes various root crops including dalo (the potato like root of the taro plant), cassava (the root of the tapioca plant) and Uvi (wild yam).

Once the pit is filled with food, the entire hole is filled with earth and left to ‘cook’ for anywhere from two to three hours depending on the amount of food.

Unearthing the lovo is done with great celebration and the succulent morsels which emerge are unwrapped and placed on large banana leaves to cool before the feasting begins.

 

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LOVO PREPARATION AT NASE LESELE VILLAGE, FIJI

 

 

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LOVO PREPARATION AT NASE LESELE VILLAGE, FIJ

 

 

THE FIJIAN MEKE

The most popular traditional Fijian dance is the meke, which is a combination of dance and story-telling through song. Both men and women perform in the meke, and the dance is viewed as a group collaboration in which men are expected to demonstrate strong, virile movements, while women are expected to be graceful and feminine. There are several versions of the meke, such as the war dance, the men’s spear dance, the men’s or women’s fan dance and the sitting dance. Mekes are performed at special functions and at cultural nights held by major resorts. The dancing and chanting are accompanied by rhythmic clapping and beating of the lali, a traditional Fijian drum. Visitors who are viewing the dance are often invited at its culmination to join in and perform a simple dance movement called the taralala.

 

 

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NASELESELE MEKE

 

 

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NASELESELE MEKE

 

 

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NASELESELE MEKE

 

 

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NASELESELE MEKE

 

 

 

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NASELESELE MEKE

 

 

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NASELESELE MEKE

 

 

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NASELESELE MEKE

 

 

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NASELESELE MEKE

 

 

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NASELESELE MEKE

 

 

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NASELESELE MEKE


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SUNDAY CHURCH SERVICE AT THE WAIRIKI CATHOLIC CHURCH

WAIRIKI HOLY CROSS PARISH

The Catholic Church here was built in 1907 in honor of a French missionary who successfully advised Taveuni’s warriors in how to defeat invading Tongans in a major battle. It’s an imposing stone structure in the Roman style with stained-glass windows and the only seating are floor mats. Fijians are known for their beautiful a cappella singing and Sunday services here are a fantastic way to experience this. Local children are often eager to show visitors around their village afterward. The international dateline or 180th meridian, which in theory splits the island but was shifted around the Fiji island group, is denoted by a sign not far from here.

There are no pews in the church; the congregation sits on the floor Fijian style. Wairiki is the Catholic center  for Taveuni where a major percentage of people belong to the church. All the important events for the Catholics are held in Wairiki, it is also home to Wairiki Secondary School, which is the biggest in Taveuni.

 

 

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WAIRIKI CATHOLIC CHURCH – HOLY CROSS PARISH

 

 

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WAIRIKI CATHOLIC CHURCH – HOLY CROSS PARISH (SIDE VIEW)

 

 

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WAIRIKI CATHOLIC CHURCH – HOLY CROSS PARISH

 

 

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WAIRIKI CATHOLIC CHURCH – HOLY CROSS PARISH

 

 

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WAIRIKI CATHOLIC CHURCH – HOLY CROSS PARISH

 

 

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WAIRIKI CATHOLIC CHURCH – HOLY CROSS PARISH

 

 

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WAIRIKI CATHOLIC CHURCH – HOLY CROSS PARISH

 

 

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WAIRIKI CATHOLIC CHURCH – HOLY CROSS PARISH

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WAIRIKI CATHOLIC CHURCH – HOLY CROSS PARISH

 

‘TAVEUNI TIME LINE’ the 180th MERIDIAN MARKER

The International Date Line. The 180 Meridian passes right through Taveuni – one of the few land masses in the world where it does. To make things easier, all of Fiji is on one time (16 hours ahead of home), but technically half of the island is in one day while half is in the other. I took a picture there at the line, lost somewhere between days.

One of Taveuni Island’s more unique tourist attractions: none other than the International Date Line, the imaginary longitude line itself we’ve all heard of that’s apparently located approximately 180 degrees from the Greenwich Meridian in London, east or west (depending on your preference).

The date line is marked by a big sign with a map in the island. There’s a gap that you can stand between, so that you can be on both sides at once and get the obligatory tourist shot.

The International Dateline makes landfall on the island of Taveuni, a place we visited on a Sunday morning.There were no signs, no streams of traffic or tourists to follow.  No lines.  If our guide from the boat hadn’t led the way, I would not have had a clue which way to go.
This was it. This was the International Dateline.We made our way across what appeared to be a soccer field or sporting venue of some kind toward a grove of trees and a little tin shack of some kind.  The shack, as it turned out, was an Assembly of God Church located right on the 180th meridian. So were they worshiping on Saturday or Sunday, or was it Monday already? But then under the little grove of trees a few feet from the church was a rather beat up sign. 

 

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‘TAVEUNI TIME LINE’ the 180th MERIDIAN MARKER

 

 

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‘TAVEUNI TIME LINE’ the 180th MERIDIAN MARKER

 

 

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‘TAVEUNI TIME LINE’ the 180th MERIDIAN MARKER – ASSEMBLY OF GOD CHURCH

 

 

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‘TAVEUNI TIME LINE’ the 180th MERIDIAN MARKER – ASSEMBLY OF GOD CHURCH


 

NANANU-I-RU

Nananu-I-Ra is an island in Fiji about 3 kilometers off the north coast of the main island of Viti Levu, near the town of Rakiraki in Ra Province. The island is 3.5 square kilometers and has a maximum elevation of 180 meters. The name “Nananu-I-Ra” means “Daydream of the West” in Fijian. Fijian mythology holds that Nananu-I-Ra is the point of departure for disembodied spirits leaving this world for the afterlife.

The highest peak and look out point on the Eastern side bears the remnants of an Ancient settlement complete with fractured and decorated Pottery in low-lying areas and the legend of mythical creatures.

 

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NANANU-I-RU

 

 

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NANANU-I-RU

 

 

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NANANU-I-RU

 

 

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NANANU-I-RU – OUR TRANSPORT BACK TO OUR SHIP


 

LANGUAGES OF FIJI

Fiji’s 1997 Constitution established Fijian as one of the official languages of the country. Fijian is an Austronesian language, a grouping that includes thousands of other languages spanning the globe. The language is of the Malayo-Polynesian family, not too different from Hawaiian and Maori. The type of Fijian spoken in the islands today is known as Bauan, named so in honour of the tiny island of Bau where the dialect was born. Fijian is spoken as a first language by more than half of the population, and as a second language by yet another quarter.

In addition to Fijian, however, English and Hindi (a variety much different from that which is spoken in India) are also considered official languages of Fiji.

Not only is English a national language, it can be heard everywhere on the islands. You can find English on TV, in the newspapers, on the radio, in businesses, and on restaurant menus. Almost everyone speaks English in Fiji and it is the main language used in communications, which is unsurprising considering the King’s English is taught in Fijian schools.

Although the Hindi language is far less prevalent, primarily used by Fijian Indians who almost always also speak English, an easy phrase to remember is namaste, which means both hello and goodbye.

Fijian was first introduced in Fiji 3500 years ago by the islands  earliest inhabitants, who either originated from an island in Vanatu or from the Solomons. For a long time, it was the only spoken language in Fiji. Early missionaries residing in the country felt that it was very important to use the local language in all their work. In 1835, two Methodist missionaries developed a written version of the language, and by 1840, missionaries had invented a Fijian spelling system and had published various books in different dialects of the language. When it was decided that a standard dialect was needed, Bao Fijian was chosen.

Even though English eventually replaced Bao Fijian as the main language of Fiji, the Fijian language never had to struggle too much to remain in existance, unlike some other Pacific languages, such as the Hawaiian language. Since Fijian independence in 1970, the Fijian language has been increasingly used in schools, on the radio and in books and newspapers.

However, it did not become an official language in Fiji until it was declared so in the 1997 Constitution, along with English and Hindustani. Then in May and June of 2005, several prominent Fijian figures petitioned for an upgrade to the status of Fijian. Though Fijian is still not considered a necessary subject in schools, numerous leaders, such as the current Fijian Educational Minister, Ro Teimumu Kepa, and the Fiji Labour Party leader, Mahendra Chaudhry, are working to change that.


 

GARDEN OF THE SLEEPING GIANT

Originally founded in 1977 to house the late actor Raymond Burr’s personal collection of orchids, the garden covers an area of 20 hectares and contains over 2,000 different examples of these delicate and exotic flowers including some rare Fijian species. Set among a lush verdant plantation, the gardens are exquisitely beautiful.

With the Nausori Highlands as a backdrop, the Garden of the Sleeping Giant takes its name from a nearby mountain in the shape of a snoozing man.

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

 

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ORCHIDS AND PLANTS FROM FIJI

 

VIDEO:


 

YASAWA ISLANDS

The Yasawa Group is an archipelago of about 20 volcanic islands in the Western Division of Fiji, with an approximate total area of 135 square kilometers.
The Yasawa volcanic group consists of six main islands and numerous smaller islets. The archipelago, which stretches in a north-easterly direction for more than 80 kilometers from a point 40 kilometers north-west of Lautoka, is volcanic in origin and very mountainous, with peaks ranging from 250 to 600 meters in height. The only safe passage for shipping is between Yasawa Island (the largest in the archipelago, about 22 kilometers long and less than a kilometer wide) and Round Island, 22 kilometers to the north-east.

The British navigator William Bligh was the first European to sight the Yasawas in 1789, following the mutiny on the Bounty. Captain Barber in the HMS Arthur visited the islands in 1794, but they were not charted until 1840, when they were surveyed and charted by a United States expedition commanded by Charles Wilkes.

Throughout the 1800s, Tongan raiders bartered for, and sometimes stole, the sail mats for which the Yasawa was famous for. The islands were largely ignored by the wider world until World War II, when the United States military used them as communications outposts.

Until 1987, it was the policy of the Fiji government that the Yasawa Group was closed to land-based tourism. There were limited cruise operations since the 1950s, but passengers had to stay aboard their ships. Local residents benefited little from the passengers presence. Since the Fijian government lifted the restrictions on land-based tourism in the Yasawa Group, a number of resorts have been established there. Due to its freehold real-estate status, three budget resorts were operating on Tavewa island since the early 1980s.

Areas of the Yasawas were the locales for both the 1949, and 1980 filming of the romance adventure film The Blue Lagoon, including the Sawa-i-lau caves, and the island Nanuya Levu (now called Turtle Island).

Tourism is growing in importance. Permission is required to visit all islands in the group except Tavewa. The home of the Tui Yasawa, the Paramount Chief of the Yasawa Islands, is at Yasawa-i-Rara, on Yasawa Island, but the largest village is Nabukeru.

 

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YASAWA ISKANDS, FIJI

 

 

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YASAWA ISKANDS, FIJI

 

 

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YASAWA ISKANDS, FIJI

 

Gunu Village, tucked away in a wide bay at the top of Naviti Island, was the first of the isolated island villages.

Backed by a line of steep hills, the village is almost invisible on the shoreline.

As we sailed closer, the village seemed to emerge from the trees.

Tonight we will enjoy a Lova Feast, which the crew prepared the for our evening meal.a traditional Fijian ‘feast’ of  fish, pork and vegetables cooked on hot rocks covered by sand.

 

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GUNU VILLAGE, NAVITI VILLAGE, FIJI The food for the Lovo feas, has been cooked in the ground and will soon be served.

Church is a very important part of the life of these villagers. Many are Methodist.

Another view of dwellings that have been restored after the cyclone.

These houses are beside an open area that is used as the rugby field… rugby is the sport of choice!

Note again, that each house has a solar energy panel. These were provided by AusAID.

————

As we landed many of the villagers were showing off their shells, shell jewellry  and handicrafts.

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GUNU VILLAGE, NAVITI VILLAGE, FIJI

 

 

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GUNU VILLAGE, NAVITI VILLAGE, FIJI

 

 

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GUNU VILLAGE, NAVITI VILLAGE, FIJI

 

 

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GUNU VILLAGE, NAVITI VILLAGE, FIJI

 

 

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GUNU VILLAGE, NAVITI VILLAGE, FIJI

 

 

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GUNU VILLAGE, NAVITI VILLAGE, FIJI

 

 

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GUNU VILLAGE, NAVITI VILLAGE, FIJI

 

 

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GUNU VILLAGE, NAVITI VILLAGE, FIJI


 

After the shell and handicraft market,  it was followed by the Sevusevu  ceremony.

What is the Sevusevu ceremony  –  Sevusevu is a traditional Fijian protocol performed when visitors arrive at a village. Essentially it is an exchange of the gift of kava, a dried root pounded into a powder and mixed as a mildly intoxicating drink.

The ceremony begins with the visitors giving kava to the villagers. One of the men represents the Captain Cook cruise ship, beginning their recitation to the village spokesman by acknowledging the chief of the village and the villagers. Next they state who/where the Sevusevu is from (in our case the Captain Cook Cruise ship), and formally acknowledge the chiefs of the Fijian confederacies.  The villagers are thanked for allowing us and the recitation is concluded by addressing the villagers’ confederate high chief with the request (he may or may not be present). The kava is then physically presented to the village spokesman and the high chief of the village is acknowledged.

 

 

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GUNU VILLAGE, NAVITI VILLAGE, FIJI – SEVUSEVU CEREMONY

 

 

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GUNU VILLAGE, NAVITI VILLAGE, FIJI – SEVUSEVU CEREMONY

 

 

 

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GUNU VILLAGE, NAVITI VILLAGE, FIJI – SEVUSEVU CEREMONY

 

 

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GUNU VILLAGE, NAVITI VILLAGE, FIJI – SEVUSEVU CEREMONY

 


 

 

SAWA-I- LAU ISLAND

Sawa-i-Lau is an odd limestone island amid a string of high volcanic islands, rising 600 feet above sea levei off the south eastern  coast of Yasawa  Island. The underwater limestone is thought to have formed a few hundred metres below the surface and then uplifted over time. Shafts of daylight enter a great dome-shaped cave – 15m tall above the water surface – where you can swim in a natural pool.

The imposing landmark is the object of  many legends, the cave is famed for the inscriptions  on its entrance walls which have long puzzled archeologist. They concluded that the stylised symbols do not represent a formal script. They probably have  symbolic or magical meanings, or were perhap’s clan or ownership marks.

According to legend, a young Chief once hid with his betrothed in the cave after her family threatened to marry her off to a rival Chief. Everyday he would swim into this secret haven with food for the girl until they eventually both escaped to an island together, where they lived happily forever. The sacred Sawa-I-lau Caves are also known as the resting place of the ten-headed ancient Fijian god, Ulutini.

 

 

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BLUE LAGOON AT SAWA-I-LAU ISLAND, YASAWAS, FIJI

 

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BLUE LAGOON AT SAWA-I-LAU ISLAND, YASAWAS, FIJI

 

 

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BLUE LAGOON AT SAWA-I-LAU ISLAND, YASAWAS, FIJI

 

 

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BLUE LAGOON AT SAWA-I-LAU ISLAND, YASAWAS, FIJI

 

 

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BLUE LAGOON AT SAWA-I-LAU ISLAND, YASAWAS, FIJI

 

 

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BLUE LAGOON AT SAWA-I-LAU ISLAND, YASAWAS, FIJI

 

 

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BLUE LAGOON AT SAWA-I-LAU ISLAND, YASAWAS, FIJI


 

RATU NAMASI SCHOOL

Further along the shores of the island is the Ratu Namasi Memorial School, established in 1949. It serves both Nabukeru village and another nearby village. The school motto is a good one:

Learn to Love, Love to Learn

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RATU NAMASI SCHOOL

 

 

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RATU NAMASI SCHOOL – CLASS ROOMS

 

 

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RATU NAMASI SCHOOL – CLASS ROOMS

 

 

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RATU NAMASI SCHOOL

 

 

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RATU NAMASI SCHOOL – CLASS ROOMS

 

 

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RATU NAMASI SCHOOL – CLASS ROOMS

 

 

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RATU NAMASI SCHOOL – CLASS ROOMS

 

 

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RATU NAMASI SCHOOL – VOLLEY BALL

 

 

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RATU NAMASI SCHOOL – VOLLEY BALL

 

 

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RATU NAMASI SCHOOL – VOLLEY BALL

 

 

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RATU NAMASI SCHOOL – VOLLEY BALL

 

 

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RATU NAMASI SCHOOL – VOLLEY BALL

VIDEO:

 

 

MAMANUCA ISLANDS

The Mamanuca Islands of Fiji are a volcanic archipelago lying to the west of Nadi and to the south of the Yasawa Islands. The group, a popular tourist destination, consists of about 20 islands, but about seven of these are covered by the Pacific Ocean at high tide.

The islands offer crystal clear waters, palm fringed sandy beaches and live coral reefs. There are islands, villages, resorts to visit, snorkel and swim.

The coastal/marine ecosystem and recreation value of the archipelago contribute to its national significance as outlined in Fiji’s Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan.

One of the islands, Monuriki, was made famous as the anonymous island that featured in the 2000 Robert Zemeckis film, Cast Away, starring Tom Hanks.

 

 

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MONURIKI , MAMANUCA ISLANDS

 

 

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MONURIKI , MAMANUCA ISLANDS

 

 

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MONURIKI , MAMANUCA ISLANDS

 

 

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MONURIKI , MAMANUCA ISLANDS

 

 

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MONURIKI , MAMANUCA ISLANDS


 

 

 

YANUYA METHODIST CHURCH

We were able to join a Methodist Church service, in the evening.

 

 

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YANUYA METHODIST CHURCH

 

 

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YANUYA METHODIST CHURCH

 

 

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YANUYA METHODIST CHURCH

 

 

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YANUYA METHODIST CHURCH

 

 

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YANUYA METHODIST CHURCH


 

 

YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI

Yalobi Village is located on Yalobi Bay on Waya island, situated in the Yasawa group of islands in north western Fiji,Yalobi. The village sits on an arc of golden beach, embraced by rugged hills and fronted by a clear aqua bay.It is a traditional village which offers visitors a welcoming ceremony and a guided tour of the village school. You can also search for treasure at the local handicraft & shell market.

 

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI – VISITORS FROM THE CAPTAIN COOK FIJI CRUISE SHIP, THE REEF ENDEAVOR,  (SEEN IN THE BACKGROUND).

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI With steep green hills rising from the shoreline and crowned with massive basalt outcrops – the eroded evidence of its volcanic provenance.

 

 

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI – WOMEN SELLING SHELLS AND HANDICRAFTS TO THE VISITORS

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI – WOMEN SELLING SHELLS AND HANDICRAFTS TO THE VISITORS

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI – WOMEN SELLING SHELLS AND HANDICRAFTS TO THE VISITORS

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI – WOMEN SELLING SHELLS AND HANDICRAFTS TO THE VISITORS

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI – WOMEN SELLING SHELLS AND HANDICRAFTS TO THE VISITORS

 

 

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI  –  PRIMARY SCHOOL  CHILDREN ABOUT TO PREFORM FOR THE VISITORS

 

 

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI – PRIMARY SCHOOL CLASS RO

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI – MAP OF THE WORLD ON THE PRIMARY SCHOOL OUTDOOR WALL

 

 

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI – PRIMARY SCHOOL CLASS DORMITORY ROOMS.

 

 

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI – PRIMARY SCHOOL DINING ROOMS

 

 

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI – A TYPICAL HOUSE (BURE) IN THE VILLAGE

 

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI – INTERIOR OF A HOUSE IN THE VIILLAGE

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI – INTERIOR OF A HOUSE     (SIDE VIEW)

 

 

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI – A COOKING AREA IN THE VILLGE

 

 

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI –  SITTING OUTSIDE

 

 

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI CHILDREN – WELCOM NG THE VISITORS

 

 

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI – A VILLAGER SITTING OUTSIDE OF HER HOUSE SELLING HANDICRAFTS

 

 

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI – METHODIST CHURCH

 

 

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI – AN OUTDOOR BATH TUB

 

 

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI – WASHING OF CLOTHES AND DRYING THEM IN THE SUN

 

 

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI – YALOBI NURSES STATION

 

 

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI – A KITCHEN AREA IN THE HOUSE

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI – OCTOPUS IS A STAPLE IN THEIR DIET AND IS USUALLY BOILED FOR 90 MINUTES BEFORE EATEN

 

 

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YALOBI VILLAGE, WAYA ISLAND, MAMANUCA ISLANDS, FIJI


 

CORAL REEFS OF FIJI

FIJI is a coral island surrounded by coral reefs in the Southwest Pacific. The UN’s International Coral Reef Initiative (ICRI) white paper, “Status of Coral Reefs of the World: 2008,” points to aggressive monitoring and management efforts of the reefs by the Fijian government as a major reason for the reef system’s excellent overall condition.

Fiji is surrounded by the largest coral reef system in the Southwest Pacific. With an area of 3,869 square miles, there are four major reefs and one major reef system. The major reefs include the outside barrier reef, inside barrier reef and fringing reef at Nameena Island, the Great Astrolabe Reef at Kadavu—also a fringing reef—and the Nuku Reef in the Mamanuka Island Group of Fiji. A fringing reef is a reef that’s close to shore; a barrier reef is a reef that runs generally parallel to the shore, but is separated from it by a lagoon too deep to support coral growth.

Because the coral reefs of Fiji are so extensive, a complete list of their inhabitants has yet to be compiled. The waters are known to contain a variety of fish and invertebrates, including everything from sea cucumbers to giant clams. Reef fish include the Napoleon wrasse, the giant grouper, butterfly fish, jacks and treallies, damselfish, surgeon fish, triggerfish, parrotfish, sweetlips, angel fish, and a variety of stingrays. Crown-of-thorns starfish (COTS) are found in Mamanuca and represent a threat to the fast-growing species of coral.

Reefs of Fiji are extensively monitored. The ICRI white paper reports that at the monitoring sites operated by the Fijian government, the average cover of live coral was 45 percent; the highest covering of live coral was at Namena, where coral is actively managed and stringent conservation efforts are in place. The paper points out that “regions with low coral cover included sites which were affected by predation of the COTS,” as is the case in Mamanucas.

 

HERE ARE SOME EXAMPLES OF CORAL THAT WERE PHOTOGRAPHED IN FIJI.

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CORAL REEF FIJI

 

 

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CORAL REEF FIJI

 

 

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CORAL REEF FIJI

 

 

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CORAL REEF FIJI

 

 

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CORAL REEF FIJI

 

 

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CORAL REEF FIJI

 

 

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CORAL REEF FIJI

 

 

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CORAL REEF FIJI

 

 

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CORAL REEF FIJI

 

 

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CORAL REEF FIJI

 

 

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CORAL REEF FIJI

 

 

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CORAL REEF FIJI

 

 

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CORAL REEF FIJI

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CORAL REEF FIJI

 

 

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CORAL REEF FIJI

 

 

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CORAL REEF FIJI

 

 

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CORAL REEF FIJI

 

 

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CORAL REEF FIJI

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CORAL REEF FIJI

VIDEO:

Meke refers to popular traditional Fijian dance, which is a combination of dance and story-telling through song. Both men and women perform in the meke, and the dance is viewed as a group collaboration in which men are expected to demonstrate strong, virile movements, while women are expected to be graceful and feminine.There are several versions of the meke, such as the war dance, the men’s spear dance, the men’s or women’s fan dance and the sitting dance.

PHOTOS:

LEONARD EPSTEIN

JANELLE BURGESS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

REMBRANDT AND THE DUTCH GOLDEN AGE – MASTERPIECES FROM THE RIJKSMUSEUM – AT THE ART GALLERY OF NEW SOUTH WALES

November 28, 2017

REMBRANDT AND THE DUTCH GOLDEN AGE   –   MASTERPIECES FROM THE RIJKSMUSEUM   –   AT THE ART GALLERY OF NEW SOUTH WALES         11  NOV  2017 – 18  FEB  2018

The works of art by the greatest Dutch painters of the 17th century.

Drawn from the Rijksmuseum, the renowned national collection of the Netherlands, this exhibition includes a rare painting by Johannes Vermeer and a room dedicated to one of the greatest minds in the history of art, Rembrandt van Rijn.

Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age presents a richly unfolding panorama of Dutch society during an era of unparalleled wealth, power and cultural confidence. In the Dutch golden age, the art of painting flourished like never before. Artists sensitively observed the beauty of the visible world, transforming it, with great skill, into vivid and compelling paintings. Their subjects ranged from intense portraits and dramatic seascapes to tranquil scenes of domestic life and careful studies of fruit and flowers.

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum – The Merry Homecoming, by Jan Steen, 1670-79, Dutch painting, oil on canvas. A drunken man is helped into a boat after leaving the inn in right background. He joins several others including children, teenagers and a nursing mother. Three figures bid them farewell. Dutch Baroque Era Painter, ca.1625-1679 Daily life was Jan Steen’s main pictorial theme. Many of the genre scenes he portrayed are lively to the point of chaos and lustfulness, even so much that a Jan Steen household, meaning a messy scene, became a Dutch proverb (een huishouden van Jan Steen). Subtle hints in his paintings seem to suggest that Steen meant to warn the viewer rather than invite him to copy this behaviour. Many of Steen’s paintings bear references to old Dutch proverbs or literature. He often used members of his family as models. Jan Steen painted also quite a few self-portraits, in which he showed no tendency of vanity. Steen did not shy from other themes: he painted historical, mythological and religious scenes, portraits, still lifes and natural scenes. His portraits of children are famous. He is also well known for his mastery of light and attention to detail, most notably in textiles. Steen was prolific, producing about 800 paintings, of which roughly 350 survive. Steen’s work was valued much by contemporaries and as a result he was reasonably well paid for his work. He did not have any students, but his work proved a source of inspiration for many painters.

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

Version 2

Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Portrait of a Man, thought to be Dr. Ephraïm Bueno, Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, 1645 – 1647 – Physician and poet Ephraim Hezekiah Bueno (1599-1665), also known as Bonus, descended from a prominent family of Marranos living in Amsterdam. Like his father, he had studied medicine in Bordeaux. A friend and collaborator of Manasseh ben Israel, Bueno copublished the first Hebrew book in Amsterdam in 1627 on Manasseh’s press.

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

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Rembrandt and the Dutch golden age masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum

 

 

PHOTOS:  LEONARD EPSTEIN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN PRIZES FOR ART 2017, IN AUSTRALIA AT THE ART GALLERY OF NEW SOUTH WALES

September 1, 2017

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN PRIZES FOR ART 2017, IN AUSTRALIA AT THE ART GALLERY OF NEW SOUTH WALES

 

The Archibald, Wynne and Sulman Prizes is an annual exhibition eagerly anticipated by artists and audiences alike.

The Archibald Prize, first awarded in 1921, is Australia’s favorite art award, and one of its most prestigious. Awarded to the best portrait painting, it’s a who’s who of Australian culture – from politicians to celebrities, sporting heroes to artists.

The Wynne Prize is awarded to the best landscape painting of Australian scenery, or figure sculpture, while the Sulman Prize is given to the best subject painting, genre painting or mural project in oil, acrylic, watercolour or mixed media.

 

 

HERE ARE SOME PHOTOS OF THIS EXHIBITION;

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

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ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0107

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0108

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0109

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0110

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0111

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0112

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0113

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0114

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0115

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0116

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0117

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0118

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0119

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0120

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0121

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0122 (1)

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0123

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0124

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0125

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0126

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0127

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0128

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

IMG_0097

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0130

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0131

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0132

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0133 (1)

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0134 (1)

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0135 (1)

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0136 (1)

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0137 (1)

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

IMG_0138 (1)

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0139 (1)

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

IMG_0140 (1)

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

IMG_0141 (1)

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

IMG_0142 (1)

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0143

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0144

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0145

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0146

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017

 

 

IMG_0147

ARCHIBALD, WYNNE, AND SULMAN EXHIBITION 2017